Saturday, December 28, 1996

Media Policies - Adult Institutions

California correctional facilities and programs are operated at public expense for the protection of society. The public has a right and a duty to know how such facilities and programs are being operated. It is the policy of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) to make known to the public through the news media all relevant information pertaining to operations of the department and facilities.

Following is a summary of California regulations and department policies and procedures regarding media access and activities. The complete regulations are found in the California Code of Regulations Title 15, Sections 3260 through 3267, found at this link: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Regulations/Adult_Operations/docs/Title152006Final.pdf

Authorized Release of Information

The following data that may be released about an inmate or parolee includes:

  • Name
  • Age
  • Birthplace
  • Place of previous residence
  • Commitment information
  • Facility assignments and behavior
  • General state of health
  • Cause of death
  • Nature of injury or critical illness (unless the condition is related to the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome)
  • Sentencing and release actions.
CDCR employee data that may be released includes:

  • Name
  • Civil service classification
  • Age
  • Work assignment
  • Length of service with the department and/or current division or unit
  • Past work assignments
  • Role or function in a newsworthy event
Media Access to Facilities

Access to adult CDCR facilities or contract facilities - prisons, community correctional facilities, re-entry facilities, prisoner mother facilities, and camps - and other CDCR offices including parole offices, requires prior approval of the institution head and the press secretary of the CDCR Office of Public and Employee Communications.

Within a facility, media representatives shall be under the direct supervision of the public information officer or his/her designee.

Media representatives cannot enter security housing units (SHU), condemned units (death row), the execution chamber, Administrative Segregation Units (AdSeg or ASU) or any area currently affected by an emergency without approval of the CDCR Secretary, the Director of the Division of Adult Institutions, or designee.

There may be limited access to other areas. These may include control booths, guard towers, protective housing units, reception centers, and units housing mentally, seriously or terminally ill inmates.

Media representatives need to supply a full name, date of birth, social security number and driver's license number to process a security clearance for access to an institution. Media representatives from outside the United States need to supply a full name, date of birth and passport information. If it is a breaking story, media representatives may be allowed access to an area outside the secure perimeter of the facility.

Requests to attend life prisoner parole hearings are handled by the Board of Parole Hearings at (916) 323-2993.

Writing, Telephoning and Visiting an Inmate

Media representatives may contact any state prison inmate by mail. It is not necessary for media to notify CDCR before communicating with an inmate. Incoming letters are opened, inspected for contraband, subject to be read, and then forwarded to the inmate. To ensure prompt processing, mail the letter to the inmate using his/her full name and CDC number in care of the institution where he/she is incarcerated. To get an inmate's CDC number, call the Inmate Check Line at (916) 557-5933. You must have the correct date of birth to obtain the CDC number.

Most inmates have access to telephones and can make outgoing collect calls on designated telephones according to their privilege group. Limitations are placed on the frequency of such calls to allow equal access to telephones by all inmates. When corresponding with an inmate, media representatives may provide a telephone number where an inmate can call them collect. It is up to the inmate to initiate the call. No restriction is placed on the identity or relationship to the inmate of the person called providing the person agrees to accept all charges for the call. Telephone calls are limited to 15 minutes and may be recorded. Media representatives may also record the call with the inmate's permission. Messages will not be taken by staff to inmates.

All inmates are allowed visits with approved visitors. If a media representative wishes to visit an inmate, write to the inmate and ask him/her to send you a CDC Form 106, Visiting Questionnaire. Your completed questionnaire must be submitted and approved by the institution before your visit. The application process takes about 30 working days. All approved visitors - friend, relative, attorney, or member of the media - may visit; however, they may not bring in cameras or recording devices. The institution will provide, upon request, pencil and paper to an adult visitor as needed. For more information about visiting, call the toll-free CDCR Visiting Information number at 1-800-374-8474 or go to this link: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Visitors/index.html

Media Interviews

Media representatives can interview inmates or parolees randomly and random or specific-person face-to-face interviews with staff. Such interviews may be restricted by time, place, duration, and the number of people in a media crew.

Random interviews of inmates involved in a specific activity or program, or encountered while covering a facility activity or event, shall be limited to the time, areas and segments of the facility population designated by the institution head.

Inmates may not participate in specific-person, face-to-face interviews. No inmate, parolee or staff shall be interviewed against their will.

Use of cameras or recording devices inside an institution or on state property requires prior approval.

A CDC Form 146, Inmate Declaration To News Media Contact, shall be completed whenever an inmate is the subject of a still, motion picture or other recording intended for use by a television or radio station, or newspaper, magazine or other publication.

Media interviews shall not be permitted with an inmate suffering from a mental illness when, in the opinion of a psychiatrist or psychologist, the inmate is not capable of giving informed consent.

Controlled access may be permitted to seriously or terminally ill patients and their housing areas.

Media representatives or their organization may be required to pay the security or escort costs provided for interviews.

Cameras and Other Audio or Visual Recording Devices

Possession of any camera, wireless microphone or other recording device within a CDCR facility is prohibited unless specifically authorized by the institution head. A location agreement and a film permit from the California Film Commission may be required for filming on state property.

An inmate's consent is not required in settings like an exercise yard or dining hall where individuals are not singled out or where an inmate's identity is not revealed. Before such shots are taken however, inmates shall be advised so those who do not want to be recognized may turn away or leave the area.

Unless there is a specified threat of imminent danger to an inmate or parolee by releasing their photograph, media representatives shall be permitted access to identification photographs (mug shots) without the inmate's or parolee's consent.

Staff cannot prohibit a person who is not on state property from photographing, filming, video taping or otherwise recording any department facilities, employees, inmates, parolees or equipment.

Non-News Access to CDC Facilities

All non-news motion picture, radio, or television programs produced at any CDCR facility must have prior approval. For definition purposes, non-news related productions include features, documentaries, news magazine programs, commercials, and pilots for proposed news, public information, religious and entertainment television programs.

The process for approval consideration begins with a written request to the CDCR Press Office. The request should include:

  • Details of the project and production location needs
  • Production schedule and duration
  • Crew size
  • Any access to inmates
  • Script sections that pertain to CDCR
  • Scenes to be filmed inside a CDCR facility
  • Type/quantity of production equipment on premises
  • Any satellite or microwave transmission from a CDCR facility
If project approval is given, a location agreement must be executed with the parent firm and a California Film Commission permit (http://www.film.ca.gov/state/film/film_homepage.jsp) will be required along with evidence of financial responsibility and liability insurance in the amount of at least $1 million with the State of California, its offices, employees, and agents as the "additional insureds." Part of the agreement provides for defending and indemnifying the State against any lawsuits. Another part of the agreement also states that the parent firm is responsible for reasonable staffing costs, including benefits and overtime rates of pay, directly associated with its filming activities.

Editorial researchers, freelance writers, authors of books, independent filmmakers, and other unaccredited media must provide proof of employment by an accredited publication/production company, or have evidence that an accredited publication/production company has contracted to purchase the completed project.

Inmates may not participate in specific-person, face-to-face interviews. Random face-to-face interviews may be permitted with inmates as stipulated by the location agreement.

Please allow a minimum of 20 working days for the least complicated request. There are no assurances that access will be granted; however, CDCR does try to accommodate requests within available resources consistent with the safe and secure operations of its institutions and California law.

CDCR Press Office (916) 445-4950

The Press Office, located at CDCR headquarters in Sacramento, articulates the Department's position on issues, manages crisis communications, solicits media coverage of departmental activities, serves as a liaison to the media, and releases information to the public. The Press Office responds to media requests made under the California Public Records Act.

The Press Office also provides other services to media:

Inmate Check Line

Media representatives needing information about a convicted felon sent to state prison in California can call the Press Office's Inmate Check Line. To request whether an individual has been sent to state prison, call (916) 557-5933. Please provide the full name and either the date of birth or the CDC number. Sentencing and/or release information will be faxed within 24 hours.

Stock Video Footage and Still Photographs

The Office of Public and Employee Communications maintains a library of stock video footage and still photographs and makes these available to the media upon request. There is current and archived footage and photographs of correctional facilities and programs, including restricted or limited access areas such as control booths, guard towers, the execution chamber, death row, and Administrative Segregation and Security Housing Units.

Media Inquiries

The Press Office researches and responds to inquiries from the media. Facts are gathered as quickly as possible and provided to the inquirer. If the requested facts are not known or are otherwise unavailable, the inquirer shall be informed and the reasons therefore.

Frequently asked questions about CDCR can be found on the CDCR Website

Press advisories and releases are posted on the CDCR website at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/News/2007_Press_Releases/index.html

Statistics and information about capital punishment are found at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Reports_Research/capital.html

The weekly population reports for adult prisoners and adult parolees are found at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Reports_Research/Offender_Information_Services_Branch/Population_Reports.asp

There are other reports about adult inmates and parolees, including characteristics, recidivism rates, behavior, time served and historical trends. There are also reports about DNA sampling and inmates serving three-strikes sentences. These reports can be found on the Offender Information Reports page.

Media Access to Scheduled Executions

CDCR's Press Office processes all media requests for access to San Quentin State Prison to cover scheduled executions. The Press Office also coordinates media requests to witness executions.

Escapes

In the event of an actual or suspected escape, the public information officer or designee shall notify radio and television stations and newspapers in the surrounding communities and the missing inmate's home community. The prison will provide the missing inmate's physical description, estimated time of disappearance, an identification photograph, the facility's search efforts and cooperation with law enforcement agencies.

Friday, December 27, 1996

CORCORAN PRISON RESUMES SHU YARD

California State Prison, Corcoran will resume yard exercise periods for inmates in Security Housing Units (SHU) tomorrow, December 28, 1996.

“I believe problems in the management of the yards have been identified and corrective actions taken since I suspended yard activity November 22,” said James H. Gomez, Director of Corrections. “Staff have been provided detailed training this month on the SHU exercise yard policy in order to effectively manage the exercise yards.”

A review of practices at Corcoran revealed that due to a recent, rapid turnover of management staff, additional training was needed to achieve the consistent management of the SHU exercise yard system. It was also found that disruptive inmates at Corcoran SHU were not being given priority transfers to the more segregated SHU design at Pelican Bay State Prison.

It will take several days before exercise yard activity is restored to full operation as a few inmate yard groups are released at a time. There currently are about 1,300 inmates in the Corcoran SHU.

“By the gradual return of yard exercise, staff will be able to monitor closely inmate reactions,” Director Gomez said. “These inmates represent the most dangerous predators within the California prison system, and are among the most difficult for prison staff to manage.”

It is known that several disruptive groups have engaged in yard fights in an effort to gain control of those yards. Despite these attempts, almost 99 percent of yard activity from January to November had no incidents or fights.

Director Gomez authorized the appointment of an ombudsman for Pelican Bay State Prison (PBSP) and an ombudsman for CSP Corcoran. As independent entities, the ombudsmen will work inside the prisons and will review and respond to inmate complaints and appeals and monitor institution operations and procedures.

Thursday, December 19, 1996

JAMES GOMEZ ACCEPTS EXECUTIVE POSITION AT PERS

Corrections Director James H. Gomez today announced he will be assuming the position of Deputy Executive Officer for the Public Employees Retirement System (PERS) effective January 21, 1997.

"I am looking forward to this new challenge, and I am proud to have had the opportunity to have worked with such hard-working dedicated staff," said Director Gomez.

Among the many accomplishments in his five years as Director are advances in medical care with the addition of a fourth licensed prison hospital and a division to manage medical care for inmates in a cost efficient manner; great strides forward in bringing greater automation to the Department to handle its paperwork processes and to increase the Department's effectiveness in providing greater support for local law enforcement; programs to promote an awareness and appreciation for the vast diversity among the 45,000 employees and effective programs to reduce sexual harassment; and the day-to-day management of the largest prison system in the Western world without a significant institutional disturbance or any staff deaths. Since Mr. Gomez was named Director, 11 new prisons have been built as the inmate population increased from 100,000 to 145,000. One institution currently under construction at Corcoran, California is the first prison designed to provide therapeutic community substance abuse treatment to hundreds of inmates. In those five years, more than 12,000 new staff have been recruited, hired and trained. A Leadership Academy was created to prepare managers for leadership roles. Gomez was responsible for the first state agency mentoring program for at-risk youth, and for implementing the Computers for Schools program in which every month inmates refurbish 3,000 used computers to be donated to school children in California. In the last five years, the Department has accelerated collections of restitution payments from inmates to victims and this year restitution collections reached a record $10 million dollars.

The PERS is responsible for managing over $100 billion dollars in assets and providing services to almost 1 million members and retirees.

Monday, December 16, 1996

CORRECTIONS VICTIM CONTRIBUTIONS TOP $10 MILLION

With its October check of $445,393, the California Department of Corrections now has contributed more than $10 million to the State Board of Control Crime Victim Compensation Fund.

"So far this year our monthly collections average just under a half million dollars," said CDC Director James H. Gomez. "Although the money can't erase the devastating impact of a crime on its victims," said Gomez, "it can help with the very real costs of medical care, counseling and emergency expenses."

Inmates with court-ordered restitution fines must contribute 22 percent of all money they receive, regardless of the source. The department automatically deducts the amount from the inmates' trust account deposits. Twenty percent goes to the Board of Control; the remaining 2 percent covers CDC administrative costs.

When Corrections first automated its fine collection system five years ago, only inmate wages were subject to deduction. A law change in December 1995 made it possible to collect a portion of all money deposited in an inmate's account, such as gifts from family members or friends. With that change, monthly collections jumped to the $.5 million mark.

"We can do better," said Gomez. "Fewer than half our inmates are paying restitution. I think it should be 100 percent."

Corrections staff are working diligently on that goal.

"We are reaching out to district attorneys, chief probation officers and judges," said Gomez. "We want everyone in the criminal justice system to realize that we have the laws and the means to hold every inmate financially accountable for his or her criminal actions."

Thursday, November 7, 1996

CDC INVESTIGATORS DIRECTED TO CORCORAN

A team of California Department of Corrections (CDC) trained investigators arrived this week at California State Prison, Corcoran to begin CDC’s probe of allegations of staff misconduct.

"I have instructed the team to provide me facts on the allegations within 60 days," said Corrections Director James H. Gomez. "The California Department of Corrections has the greatest interest in learning the facts. If there are staff guilty of the allegations, I want them fired and prosecuted."

A team of 14 investigators and an attorney started a personnel investigation that has been delayed for two years at the request of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

As the statute of limitations approaches for CDC to take any disciplinary action, agreement was received from the FBI for CDC to initiate its own investigation of allegations that staff staged fights among inmates and that some staff attempted to impede the FBI probe.

CDC investigators are working with the FBI to schedule interviews with two agents to determine whether an alleged high speed chase two years ago involving CDC staff and the FBI did or did not take place.

"I also am asking the FBI to share any information it has that will assist our investigation, this includes copies of any reports prepared by FBI agents pertaining to the allegations," said Gomez. "We also are asking the FBI to provide copies of documents taken from Corcoran two years ago by Correctional Officer Richard Caruso."

CDC has cooperated fully with FBI requests since its investigation began in October 1994. CDC has provided the FBI with compete access to documents, personnel, and prison facilities. CDC also delayed its own investigation to accommodate the FBI.

"I want the facts," said Gomez. "We’ve cooperated fully with the FBI for two years in their inquiry and now we need their assistance in our investigation."

Friday, November 1, 1996

CORRECTIONS REFILES MEDIA ACCESS REGULATIONS

The California Department of Corrections (CDC) has refiled its media access regulations with the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) on the basis of "operational necessity." This allows the regulations to remain in effect for 160 days while the department responds to comments regarding the new media policy.

Contrary to earlier reports in the news media, the regulations have not been refiled as "emergency" regulations.

The regulations eliminate in-person media interviews with specific inmates and eliminate the confidential status of inmate-media correspondence. They have been in effect since their adoption April 8, 1996. They do not affect the media's ability to speak by telephone with inmates or correspond with them.

As required by state law, the department submitted the regulations to OAL for approval earlier this year. On Oct. 28, 1996, OAL notified CDC that it intended to disapprove the regulations based on concerns over the department's response to several comments posed by the Prison Law Office and Senator Quentin Kopp.

The department now has 160 days to draft and submit its response to OAL. Under legal procedures, CDC must either modify its proposal to address the concerns of the commenters or give adequate reasons why it did not do so.

Wednesday, October 30, 1996

CEREMONY FOR SLAIN CORRECTIONAL PEACE OFFICERS

At the annual Wreath Laying Ceremony Friday morning, Governor Pete Wilson will pay tribute to Ineasie M. Baker, a Youth Counselor who was slain August 9, 1996, allegedly by one of the wards she was supervising. Hers is the 34th name to be added to the Correctional Peace Officer Memorial at Galt.

Wilson will be joined by the Corrections Director James H. Gomez and Youth Authority Director Francisco J. Alarcon.

John Mitchum, an actor-writer and the brother of actor Robert Mitchum, will read the poem he wrote in memory of Ineasie Baker. A Youth Counselor at the Heman G. Stark Youth Training School in Chino, Baker was murdered at the school and her body thrown in a dumpster. After a lengthy search, her body was discovered at the local landfill.

Baker's family will be at the ceremony to accept a memorial flag that was flown over the State Capitol. The flag will be presented by Governor Wilson and state Assemblyman Larry Bowler.

Participating in the ceremony will be color guards and honor guards from two Youth Authority facilities and five state prisons along with the drums and bagpipes of the City of Sacramento Pipe Band. The honor guard from Pleasant Valley State Prison at Coalinga will give a 21-gun salute to honor all correctional peace officers killed in the line of duty.

The ceremony begins at 10 a.m. Friday, November 1, at the Correctional Training Facility, 9850 Twin Cities Road in Galt.

Monday, October 28, 1996

FOLSOM STATE PRISON TO DELIVER HALLOWEEN BASKETS TO CHILD PROTECTIVE SERVICES

One hundred Halloween baskets made by inmates and staff at Folsom State Prison will be delivered to El Dorado County Child Protective Services on Tuesday, October 29, 1996 at 9:00 a.m. at 3057 Briw Road, Placerville.

Children in Halloween costume will be at the location to receive the baskets, which will be delivered to children in the Child Protective Services at another time.

The colorful wooden baskets constructed by inmates at the prison will be filled with treats donated by local merchants and prison staff. A special book mark designed by inmates in the Arts-in-Corrections program to highlight the National Red Ribbon Campaign will also be included in each basket.

Another 400 baskets will be delivered to Sacramento and Placer counties for their Child Protective Services. This is the sixth year that inmates at Folsom State Prison have provided counties with these Halloween crafts.

Tuesday, October 22, 1996

STATE CORRECTIONS OFFICIALS FORMALLY DEDICATE SALINAS VALLEY STATE PRISON

SOLEDAD-California's newest state prison was formally dedicated today during a ceremony here attended by state and local officials and community leaders.

Salinas Valley State Prison is the state's 32nd prison and the latest to be built as part of a major prison construction program begun in the mid-1980s. The facility opened in May 1996 and already houses 2,696 inmates, most of them maximum security.

The prison cost $236 million to build and operates on a $60 million annual budget.

Local officials attending today's ceremony included supervisors from Monterey County and mayors from a number of cities in the county's agriculture-rich Salinas Valley. They noted the prison's economic contribution to the surrounding communities including the addition of 928 jobs.

"We appreciate the positive support we continue to receive from Monterey County and our neighbors here in the Salinas Valley," said James H. Gomez, Di rec tor of the California Department of Corrections. "We are fortunate to be a part of this economic community."

The new institution is adjacent to the California Training Facility, a prison in operation since the 1940s. Salinas Valley State Prison operates an extensive vo ca tion al training program and provides a number of educational programs from pre-literacy through high school diploma.

Completion of Salinas Valley State Prison leaves only one remaining major state prison still under construction-the California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison at Corcoran. It is scheduled to open next year.

Wednesday, October 16, 1996

CALIFORNIA PRISONS WIN MAJOR COURT VICTORY

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals today reversed a contempt of court order against the California Department of Corrections saying U.S. District Court Judge Lawrence Karlton overstepped his authority in making such a ruling.

"I am elated at this decision" Corrections Director James H. Gomez said "It is a vindication of the State's position over the last two years that Judge Karlton was attempting to run the California prison system."

In their decision, Circuit Court Judges Goodwin, Farris, and Kleinfeld said that a consent decree requiring "appropriate" psychiatric care for inmates is not specific enough to hold prison officials in contempt for failing to provide such care.

"This is a 100 percent win for the taxpayers" said Gomez "It shows what can be accomplished by standing up to a federal judge who attempted to coerce State officials to spend taxpayer money without justification."

Karlton imposed a $10,000 a day fine, but stayed the fine as long as prison officials complied with his directives.

Circuit Judge Kleinfeld wrote" the practical effect of such a vague standard as "appropriate psychiatric care" is that the prison, and the state budget for the prison, remain under the continuing and largely unfettered supervision of the district court and its magistrate judge, mediator, special master, and experts, instead of the state political process and appointed prison administrators."

The consent decree settled a class action inmate lawsuit Jay Gates vs the California Department of Corrections. In the decree, CDC agreed to provide an "outpatient program that would provide appropriate psychiatric evaluation and treatment" for prison inmates. The Department spent over $10 million dollars on the program, but Judge Karlton said that was not enough to suit him and issued a contempt ruling.

Thursday, October 3, 1996

UPDATE ON SACRAMENTO PRISON INMATE DISTURBANCE

Accounts of all staff present during Friday's racial disturbance between Black and Hispanic inmates at California State Prison, Sacramento has provided more precise information than was available immediately after the incident was brought under control.

The fight involved about 150 to 200 inmates in the facility B main exercise yard. The fight started about 9 am and took 31 minutes to bring under control. In the process of stopping the fight, correctional officers used batons, pepper spray, rubber blocks, and rifle shots. Twenty one rifle shots were fired by seven staff and two officers fired 8 rounds of rubber blocks from 37 millimeter launchers.

The staff accounts reflect a pattern of inmates fighting in small groups at various parts of the large exercise area. The most serious injuries were suffered by 10 inmates.

Four staff were examined by doctors at community hospitals and then re turned to work..

One inmate died from a gunshot wound to the buttocks. Victor Flores was shot as he raced toward staff, refusing all orders to lay down on the ground. Four other inmates are recovering from gunshot wounds, and six inmates are recovering from stab wounds.

Another 50 inmates were treated for exposure to pepper spray and superficial scrapes and bruises. There were an additional 11 staff members treated for superficial injuries at the prison infirmary and returned to duty immediately.

Once all inmates were returned to the cells, staff searched the exercise yard and found 56 inmate-made weapons. All of the inmates remain locked in their cells as staff interview all inmates about the fight and also search each cell for weapons and contraband.

The prison will remain on lockdown with inmates being provided meals in their cells until the Warden determines it is appropriate to resume controlled in mate movement.

Thursday, August 22, 1996

CDC POLICY OF INTEGRATING PRISON YARDS

Gang activity is one of the most serious threats to prison safety and security. Gang members who assault other inmates and prison staff are the most violent and predatory in California prisons.

These predators are removed from general population and placed in Security Housing Units (SHU) at Pelican Bay State Prison and Corcoran State Prison or in Administrative Segregation (Ad Seg) units at each of California's 32 prisons.

"Isolating these 4,000 inmates who cannot behave within the prison system protects the remaining 137,000 inmates who want to do their prison sentences peacefully," said James H. Gomez, Director of the California Department of Corrections (CDC). "The difference is 60 to 70 inmates a year who aren't being killed because these predators are isolated from the rest of the prison population."

In the 1970s, one out of every 1,800 inmates was killed by another inmate. In the 1980s, one out of every 3,500 inmates was killed by another inmate. In the 1990s, one out of every 12,000 inmates is killed by another inmate. Much of this reduction of violence is a result of isolating violent predators from the rest of the prison population.

Predatory inmates remain in controlled housing until they can prove they can live peacefully with rival gang members. CDC has had a policy since 1984 of integrating rival gang members during constitutionally required exercise periods at all SHU and Ad Seg areas.

Effective prison management requires identifying inmates on an individual basis to determine the appropriate mix to minimize potential violence. It is necessary to evaluate the inmates behavior with rivals in a secure controlled setting before returning them to less restrictive housing where they would associate with larger numbers of inmates, including potential rivals.

Corcoran State Prison will return to this policy within 30 days. It is a man aged and measured process to screen all inmates. Inmates known to be enemies are not placed together in exercise or other environments.

"No one is more concerned about safety in prison than I am," said Director Gomez. "The success of the system which is aimed at improving safety for all inmates and staff is the proper management of this process by prison staff."

CDC staff have been provided with pepper gas spray and other non-lethal tools to control outbreaks of violence. The goal is to limit the amount of force to only what is necessary to restore security.

Wednesday, August 14, 1996

STATE PRISON INMATES JOIN BATTLE AGAINST FIRES

More than 2,100 orange-suited California prison inmates are working side-by-side with other fire crews battling the numerous fires raging throughout the state.

Inmates from 138 crews from 36 of the state's 38 conservation camps are clearing fire lines on 15 separate fires. The 2,194 inmates and 142 staff from the California Department of Corrections (CDC) are assigned to fires in 21 counties, from Modoc in the north to Riverside in the south. They will remain on the fires until they are fully contained and will then be deployed to another fire.

The inmates are normally assigned to the conservation camps, or minimum security prisons, located in rural areas. The Camps house almost 4,000 inmates and are jointly operated by CDC and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. (CDF).

CDC oversees camp security and operations; its staff provides the necessary security while inmates are on the fire line. CDF provides fire fighting training and supervises inmate firefighting efforts.

Inmates serve their sentences at conservation camps after passing a highly selective screening process and a rigorous firefighting training regime. A typical firefighting inmate was convicted of a nonviolent offense, has an average sentence of two years and will spend about eight months in camp before parole.

When not fighting fires, inmates are dispatched to other emergency and non-emergency tasks including earthquake response, flood control, wildlife habitat preservation and graffiti removal.

During an average fire season, inmates work up to two million hours in fire prevention and firefighting response. They are paid $1.00 an hour on the fire lines and from $1.45 to $3.90 a day for non-emergency work.

It is estimated that state and local government save more than $70 million that otherwise would be paid to accomplish the work inmates perform.

Tuesday, August 13, 1996

CORRECTIONAL OFFICER RECEIVES AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE

Correctional Officer Lyn Pinckney of the California Department of Corrections (CDC) today was awarded the 1996 Richard A. McGee Award for his outstanding contributions to the community of Blythe and the significant savings of taxpayer dollars.

Officer Pinckney has distinguished himself and the Department through extensive innovation in his field of responsibility said James Gomez, Director of Corrections. He enabled state, county, and city government agencies to save nearly $200,000 in labor costs.

Pinckney was honored for his outstanding work with the inmate community work crew program at Chuckawalla Valley State Prison (CVSP) in Blythe. Under Pinckney, the inmate work crew has cleaned roadsides, and maintained public parks, the Blythe Cemetery and public easements in Blythe. The Blythe City Council has also commended Officer Pinckney for his crew's work in the city.

The Richard A. McGee Award is made annually by the American Justice Institute (AJI), a national organization that conducts research and planning in the correctional field and recognizes excellence and innovation by correctional staff.

Officer Pinckney joined CDC in 1986 and has worked at CVSP since 1988. He has served as the Olympic Games Coordinator for CVSP and was a member of the Negotiations Management Team. He has also served as an Acting Correctional Counselor I and as an Acting Correctional Sergeant.

Pinckney was born and raised in Napa, California, and attended Monterey Peninsula College.

Thursday, June 20, 1996

HIGH DESERT STATE PRISON DEDICATION CEREMONY

Corrections official today joined with state and local elected officials to dedicate a second prison in Susanville: the High Desert State Prison.

"The citizens of Susanville are like other California communities who welcome a second prison as neighbors," said Director of Corrections James Gomez. "The people of this city will share in increased economic prosperity and, at the same time, help us improve public protection."

At the ceremony, Director Gomez was joined by Youth and Adult Correctional Agency (YACA) Secretary Joe Sandoval, and Warden Bill Merkle of the High Desert State Prison. Representatives from the offices of state Senator Tim Leslie and Assemblyman Bernie Richter attended as well as Susanville Mayor Doug Sayers, and Lassen County Board of Supervisors Chairperson Jean P. Loubet.

Located next to California Correctional Center, Susanville, the new prison is designed to house 2,425 inmates.

"We are committed to continuing our strong partnership with the people of Susanville and Lassen County," said Director Gomez. The prison opened September 1995, and cost $272 million to build. The maximum security facility currently employs about 1000 staff, with an annual operating budget of $65 million for fiscal year 1995-96.

Wednesday, June 19, 1996

CORRECTIONS ADDS NEARLY $.5 MILLION TO VICTIMS' FUND

In April alone, the California Department of Corrections collected $435,306.73 for the State Board of Control's Crime Victim Compensation Fund. The money comes from state prison inmates and is used to cover medical costs, mental health treatment, and emergency expenses of California crime victims.

"This is the fifth straight month that collections have approached the half million dollar mark," said CDC Director James H. Gomez. "At this rate, we will be able to generate nearly $5.6 million for crime victims in 1996 alone."

Collections skyrocketed in December 1995 after a new law allowed the department to collect a portion of all deposits to inmates accounts, regardless of the source, if the inmate has a court-ordered restitution fine. Before then, Corrections could collect from these inmates' wages only.

"Now we need to encourage district attorneys, chief probation officers, and judges to require restitution for all convicted felons," said Gomez.

Currently only about half of the inmates in state prisons have been ordered to pay restitution. "We want to make that 100 percent," said Gomez.

"In my judgment, every single inmate should be required to pay restitution," Gomez continued. "We have the laws, the means, and the will to make it happen."

Friday, June 14, 1996

CORRECTIONS HONORS ITS HEROES

An unconscious victim is pulled from a burning house, deadly inmate attacks are thwarted, a rapist is pursued and captured, a 77-year-old angler is saved from the pounding surf. The Department of Corrections (CDC) recognized these and other employee heroics at the annual Medal of Valor Ceremony, Friday, June 14 at 12:00 noon on the West steps of the State Capitol.

CDC honored 30 of its employees for acts of heroism and outstanding service while on duty and in the community. The employees--male and female, peace officer and civilian--were selected out of a group of more than 70 nominees from CDC facilities throughout the state.

Youth and Adult Correctional Agency Secretary Joe Sandoval and CDC Director James Gomez presented the heroism medals and also awards for Correctional Officer and Correctional Supervisor of the Year.

During the ceremony, Sacramento television news anchormen Dave Walker, KCRA-TV, Alan Frio, KXTV-TV, and David Ono, KOVR-TV, highlighted details of the acts that earned the medals.

A summary of the individual actions and awards received is attached below. Additional information may be obtained from the public information officer at the prison listed or from the CDC Communications Office.

1996 MEDAL OF VALOR CEREMONY AWARD RECIPIENTS


MEDAL OF VALOR

The Medal of Valor is the Department's highest award, earned by employees distinguishing themselves by conspicuous bravery or heroism above and beyond the normal demands of correctional service. The employee shall display great courage in the face of immediate life-threatening peril and with full knowledge of the risk involved. The act should show professional judgment and not jeopardize operations or the lives of others.

Correctional Officers Tom C. Hopper, Gary Colvin, and Arturo R. Ramirez--Calipatria State Prison Several inmates, armed with inmate-manufactured weapons, came into a program office at Calipatria State Prison and began assaulting staff. As he came to the rescue of a sergeant, Officer Hopper was struck from behind by one inmate then punched in the jaw by another. Hopper maintained physical control of the first inmate even while being struck in the back and kicked in the face by others. Officer Hopper sustained puncture wounds to his back and arm. During the same incident, Officer Colvin helped wrestle an assailant to the ground, forcing him to drop his weapon. Officer Colvin sustained two puncture wounds to his back. Also responding, Officer Ramirez used his side handle baton to restrain one of the assailants. Officer Ramirez sustained a serious knee injury. All three officers acted with complete disregard for their own safety in an attempt to prevent injury to others.

Correctional Officer Bryan Clayton Gallemore--Corcoran State Prison With no thought for his personal safety, Officer Bryan Clayton Gallemore came to the aid of an officer being choked by an inmate to the point of unconsciousness. So violent was the attack that Gallemore's side-handle baton could not stop it. He then wrestled the inmate to the ground, in a successful effort to stop the attack. Officer Gallemore was injured in the incident, but his unselfish and courageous efforts prevented the serious injury or the death of his fellow officer.

Lieutenant Ken J. Howard--Calipatria State Prison A stabbing attack on an officer brought immediate response from Lieutenant Howard. With complete disregard for his own safety, Lt. Howard chased off the inmate who had stabbed the victim several times. He was then attacked from behind by two other inmates, sustaining four stab wounds in the back. In spite of this cowardly and vicious attack, he managed to subdue his attacker, putting an end to the incident. Lt. Howard's actions undoubtedly prevented grievous bodily harm to the officer first attacked.

GOLD MEDAL

The Corrections Star Gold Medal is the Department's second highest award for heroic deeds under extraordinary circumstances. The employee shall display courage in the face of immediate peril in acting to save the life of another person.

Correctional Officer Elizabeth A. Thornhill--California State Prison, Corcoran Officer Thornhill came to the aid of a fellow officer who was being stabbed in the back by an inmate in the Corcoran dining hall. She drew her side handle baton, striking the inmate and then helping to wrestle him to the ground. She disarmed the inmate and placed him in handcuffs. Officer Thornhill's quick action contributed to the survival of her fellow officer who suffered seven stab wounds to his back, shoulder, chest and arm.

House Monitor Michael MacCracken--Rubidoux Re-Entry Facility An armed assailant entered the Rubidoux Community Re-Entry Center, pistol whipped two persons, shot an inmate and killed a visitor. Michael MacCracken, the house monitor on duty, used sound tactics and great courage to keep the situation from worsening even more. He tricked the assailant into allowing him to place an outside call which alerted police to the situation. MacCracken then handled incoming phone calls from the news media and continued to ensure the safety of the hostages. For three hours he kept the assailant preoccupied, creating a diversion that allowed inmates to escape and the SWAT team to enter the building and kill the assailant.

Correctional Officer John Towle--Wasco State Prison While shopping at a convenience store in Delano, Correctional Officer John Towle saw two men fighting; one was stabbing the other with a knife. Towle immediately moved into the fray and disarmed the attacker. After police arrived, the assailant started fighting with the arresting officer. Officer Towle again restrained him, preventing injury to the officer. Towle's courageous and unselfish response to the assault most likely saved the victim's life and his subsequent actions reflect positively on his training as a peace officer.

Correctional Sergeant Dwight McGhee--Sierra Conservation Center While at home, Sgt. McGhee noticed a neighboring house on fire. When he learned there may be a person inside, McGhee took a garden hose and crawled through the house, attempting to stay under the layer of dense smoke just above floor-level. Making his way to the back of the house, Sgt. McGhee found the victim unconscious on the bedroom floor. He broke out the bedroom window and passed the victim to another neighbor outside. As a result of Sgt. McGhee's quick, decisive action, the victim suffered only smoke inhalation.

SILVER MEDAL

The Corrections Star Silver Medal is the Department's third highest award for acts of bravery under extraordinary or unusual circumstances. The employee shall display courage in the face of potential peril while saving or attempting to save the life of another person or distinguish him/herself by performing in stressful situations with exceptional tactics or judgment.

Associate Warden Carolyn P. Graham and Associate Warden Roderick Q. Hickman--California Medical Facility A very agitated inmate grabbed a female recreational therapist, threatening to plunge two sharpened pencils into her jugular vein if his demands were not met. Included in his demands were a meeting with the warden and the news media, and a trip back to Hawaii. During the standoff, the inmate held the therapist and five other inmates and two staff as hostages in a prison day room. A SERT team was sent to the scene and waited to go into action. Associate Wardens Graham and Hickman, both trained in conflict management, demonstrated the ultimate in professionalism in calming both the inmate and the hostages. Eventually they persuaded the inmate to release the hostages. Their consummate professionalism in a frightful and compromising situation most likely resulted in preventing serious injury or death to one or more of the hostages.

Correctional Counselor Prescott D. Bush--Folsom State Prison A correctional officer was being assaulted by an inmate near the counselor offices. Alerted by the officer's alarm, Counselor Bush responded to the scene. Without knowing if a weapon was involved he immediately tackled the assailant, dislodging his hold on the officer and breaking off the attack. Counselor Bush's brave actions prevented further injury to the downed correctional officer.

Parole Agent Juan T. Castillo--Region II Parolev While driving in Oakland, Agent Castillo saw a bleeding, partially clothed, and hysterical woman. After stopping to assist her, Agent Castillo was told that a suspect in a group of males nearby had beaten and raped the woman. When he approached the group, two males started running. Agent Castillo gave chase and apprehended a suspect who was later convicted of the sexual assault. His brave and unselfish actions most likely stopped a continuing assault and resulted in one less sex offender on our streets.

Correctional Officer Kevin Anderson--California Rehabilitation Center While he was closing the facility's yard, Officer Anderson saw a fight break out between groups of about 30 inmates. Seeing that it was a racial disturbance and could easily get out of hand, he told the officer standing by the entrance gate to close it. Now, locked in and alone in this extremely volatile environment, Officer Anderson, with his baton drawn, ordered the combatants to stop fighting and lie face down on the ground. The inmates complied and the disturbance was quelled in about two minutes--even before assisting staff arrived. Anderson's quick response is credited with preventing the highly volatile situation from getting out of control.

Correctional Officer William Pitcher--Wasco State Prison An explosion at a Bakersfield refinery caused a large fireball to engulf the vehicle in front of Officer Picher's van. Ignoring the real possibility of another explosion, and without regard for his own safety, he gave aid and comfort to the victims and called for emergency medical response. By his actions, Officer Picher represented himself as a true and caring professional.

Correctional Sergeant Carlos Cuellar, Correctional Officers James D. Wilbanks and Kyle Buntley, and Medical Technical Assistant Lance Lowery--Wasco State Prison Responding to a fire alarm, Wasco staff discovered a cell, filled with smoke. The sole inmate inside was standing at the cell door laughing. The inmate refused to exit the cell. Instead, he moved further into the smoke where he could not be seen or heard. Although the fire department had not yet arrived, Sgt. Cuellar, Officers Wilbanks and Buntley and MTA Lowery felt they must act immediately. The four staff members, facing the unknown, entered the burning cell. The inmate violently resisted, striking Officer Wilbanks in the face. After a prolonged struggle, staff subdued the inmate and removed him to safety. Their heroic actions went above and beyond normal duty.

BRONZE MEDAL

The Corrections Star Bronze Medal is the Department's award for saving a life without placing oneself in peril. The employee shall have used proper training and tactics in a professional manner to save, or clearly contribute to saving the life of another person.

Firefighter Michael Vincent McCoy--Wasco State Prison Responding to a mutual aid request from the Kern County Fire Department, Wasco State Prison Firefighter Michael McCoy encountered a serious, multiple-vehicle accident. A passenger vehicle had collided with a tank truck carrying 1,000 pounds of pesticide. The vehicle was severely damaged and the occupants trapped inside. Gasoline and pesticide spilled from the truck. Firefighter McCoy remained focused on the task, ignoring the gruesome nature of the scene, and directing the use of the Jaw's of Life to complete removal of the trapped occupants. His professional actions in the light of obvious danger to himself and the victims are worthy of the award of the bronze medal.

Parole Agents Steven Rodriguez and Karen Blackburn--Region I Parole A local police officer was involved in a pursuit of a felony warrant suspect when the suspect's family turned on the officer. Hearing the officer's radio call for backup, both agents Rodriguez and Blackburn responded. The police officer was struggling with the suspect who was choking his small child. A female was assaulting the officer and interfering with the arrest. Agent Blackburn restrained the female suspect. Officer Rodriguez used the police officer's pepper spray to subdue both suspects. The Agents' alertness and quick action saved an innocent child and prevented serious injury to the officer.

Correctional Sergeant Michael Quaglia and Correctional Officer Edward John Popke--Sierra Conservation Center Sgt. Quaglia and Officer Popke received information by radio that an auto accident had occurred outside of the prison. Upon arrival, they saw a victim in a ravine who was losing a substantial amount of blood from a large hole in the side of his head. While the officers were attempting to stabilize the victim, they noticed he had quit breathing. After they applied emergency aid the victim started breathing again. They then arranged for helicopter airlift to a local hospital. Their quick reaction to the accident most likely saved the life of the victim.

Correctional Sergeant Sheldon A. Windley, Jr.--Mule Creek State Prison A teenage girl with several loaded weapons barricaded herself in a basement bedroom--a possible suicide. The police department tried for several hours to talk the girl out. Sgt. Windley, head of the Mule Creek State Prison's Negotiation Management Team, was contacted and deployed to the scene. The sergeant took over communications with the girl and she surrendered to authorities within two hours. Because of his extraordinary skills in crisis management, Sgt. Windley was able to resolve the situation without harm to the girl or anyone else.

Chief Deputy Warden Robert Ayers and Captain Steven Lawrence--Pelican Bay State Prison The two Pelican Bay staff members were fishing in the frigid waters off the coast of Oregon when they observed a 77-year-old man floundering in the water. He was trapped between his boat and several rocks and was being plummeted by the surf. Disregarding personal danger, Chief Deputy Ayers and Captain Lawrence rushed into the rocky surf to rescue him. Their actions probably saved the man's life.

Correctional Officer Anthony M. Salas--R.J. Donovan Correctional Facility As he was returning to the Correctional Training Center in Galt, Officer Salas witnessed a collision between a car and semi-truck. One of the victims, a sergeant from the training center, was bleeding profusely from a scalp laceration. The truck had overturned in a field and caught on fire--with the driver still inside. Officer Salas provided first aid to the sergeant and directed rescue efforts by other Corrections staff including the use of fire extinguishers and traffic control.

CORRECTIONAL OFFICER AND SUPERVISOR OF THE YEAR AWARDS

The employee shall exemplify the high quality of service the nation receives from its detention and correctional officers.

CORRECTIONAL OFFICER OF THE YEAR

Correctional Officer Jim Wilson--California Institution for Men A 14-year veteran with the California Department of Corrections, Officer Wilson today is being recognized for his leadership abilities and job performance. He has improved the entire operation of the housing unit for geriatric and disabled inmates at the California Institution for Men. Officer Wilson has been instrumental in creating work projects and job assignments that help the disabled inmates become productive, useful, and in some cases, physically rehabilitated.

A seasoned, alert and skilled professional, Officer Wilson seeks out and eliminates drug activity and predatory behavior within the unit--creating a safe environment for the prison system's most vulnerable inmates. On several occasions, Officer Wilson has performed CPR and other life-saving or heroic measures. He has served as a consultant with other agencies on the management and accommodation of aged and disabled offenders. Recently, the American Association of Architects expressed interest in the facility modification prototypes designed by Officer Wilson.

CORRECTIONAL SUPERVISOR OF THE YEAR

Correctional Sergeant Frederick Brian Haws--California Correctional Institution A respected leader, Sgt. Haws is being honored for his ability to communicate, his skill as a trainer, and his commitment toward excellence. As a member of the Special Emergency Response Team, Sgt. Haws has been involved in critical inmate disturbances and helped evacuated inmates from community facilities during the Los Angeles riots. With other law enforcement agencies, he participated in high risk search warrants for the Campaign Against Marijuana Planters. He also worked alongside the National Guard seeking out drug traffickers and illegal aliens in Operation Border Ranger.

An avid trainer for the department, Sgt. Haws recently developed a lesson plan based on the Navy SEAL training. An excellent hostage rescue trainer, he has trained personnel from Alaska, Utah, Colorado, Nevada and Hawaii. He also has worked with staff from the Virgin Islands and Finland to develop their own disturbance control programs.

Wednesday, June 12, 1996

CORRECTIONS TO HONOR HEROES

An unconscious victim is pulled from a burning house, deadly inmate attacks are thwarted, a rapist is pursued and captured, a 77-year-old angler is saved from the pounding surf. The Department of Corrections (CDC) will recognize these and other employee heroics at the annual Medal of Valor Ceremony, Friday, June 14 at 12:00 noon on the West steps of the State Capitol.

CDC will pay tribute at the ceremony to 30 of its employees for acts of heroism and outstanding service while on duty and in the community. The employees--male and female, peace officer and civilian--were selected out of a group of more than 70 nominees from CDC facilities throughout the state.

Youth and Adult Correctional Agency Secretary Joe Sandoval and CDC Director James Gomez will present the heroism medals and also awards for Correctional Officer and Correctional Supervisor of the Year.

During the ceremony, Sacramento television news anchormen Dave Walker, KCRA-TV, Alan Frio, KXTV-TV, and David Ono, KOVR-TV, will highlight details of the acts that earned the medals.

A brief summary of the individual actions and awards received is attached. Additional information may be obtained from the public information officer at the prison listed or from the CDC Communications office.

PARTIAL EMBARGO: DO NOT RELEASE THE TYPE OF AWARD (i.e. Medal of Valor, Gold Star, etc.) RECEIVED BY ANY INDIVIDUAL RECIPIENT UNTIL AFTER NOON, JUNE 14.

1996 MEDAL OF VALOR CEREMONY AWARD RECIPIENTS


MEDAL OF VALOR

Correctional Officer Bryan Clayton Gallemore--Corcoran State Prison. Forced inmate to stop attack on another officer who was semiconscious and being choked by that inmate.

Lieutenant Ken J. Howard--Calipatria State Prison. Came to aid of officer being assaulted. Chased off first assailant and, in spite of stabs wounds, subdued another inmate who attacked him.

Correctional Officers Tom C. Hopper, Gary Colvin, and Arturo R. Ramirez--Calipatria State Prison. Rescued fellow officer being assaulted by several inmates with prison-manufactured weapons. Each officer sustained injuries during the violent struggle that ensued.

GOLD STAR

Correctional Officer Elizabeth A. Thornhill--Corcoran State Prison. Came to the aid of a fellow officer who was being attacked by an inmate and assisted in subduing and disarming him.

House Monitor Michael MacCracken--Rubidoux Re-Entry Facility. (Contract Employee) Displayed sound tactics and courage when armed assailant fired on individuals at the community facility, killing one and injuring others.

Correctional Officer John Towle--Wasco State Prison. Broke up stabbing assault at a convenience store and then assisted arresting officer by restraining attacker.

Correctional Sergeant Dwight McGhee--Sierra Conservation Center. Crawled through dense smoke to rescue unconscious victim from a burning house.

SILVER STAR

Associate Warden Carolyn P. Graham and Associate Warden Roderick Q. Hickman--California Medical Facility. Used experience in conflict management to defuse a very threatening situation when an agitated inmate attempted to hold seven people hostage in the prison.

Correctional Counselor Prescott D. Bush--Folsom State Prison. Thwarted attack on correctional officer, without concern for his own safety.

Parole Agent Juan T. Castillo--Region II Parole. Gave assistance to rape victim, pursued and captured suspect.

Correctional Officer Kevin Anderson--California Rehabilitation Center. Stopped major racial disturbance, preventing serious injury to combatants.

Correctional Officer William Pitcher--Wasco State Prison. Assisted victims whose cars were engulfed by fireball from Bakersfield refinery explosion.

Correctional Sergeant Carlos Cuellar, Correctional Officers James D. Wilbanks and Kyle Buntley, and Medical Technical Assistant Lance Lowery--Wasco State Prison. Rescued inmate from the cell he had set afire; the inmate violently resisted their efforts to bring him to safety.

BRONZE STAR

Firefighter Michael Vincent McCoy--Wasco State Prison. Used jaws of life in volatile and toxic situation (auto/tank truck collision) to rescue victims.

Parole Agents Steven Rodriguez and Karen Blackburn--Region I Parole. Both went to the aid of police officer who was having trouble making arrest. Restrained one suspect and used pepper spray on another to subdue resistance.

Correctional Sergeant Michael Quaglia and Correctional Officer Edward John Popke--Sierra Conservation Center. Responded to scene of auto accident and applied emergency aid, saving the life of victim.

Correctional Sergeant Sheldon A. Windley, Jr.--Mule Creek State Prison. At the request of the local police department used negotiation skills to talk a young woman out of committing suicide.

Chief Deputy Warden Robert Ayers and Captain Steven Lawrence--Pelican Bay State Prison. Rescued a 77-year-old man from the frigid, pounding surf.

Correctional Officer Anthony M. Salas--R.J. Donovan Correctional Facility. First person on scene at auto accident. Provided emergency aid and directed rescue efforts.

Thursday, May 9, 1996

FACTS ABOUT USED LAW BOOKS AND STATE PRISONS

Last year, the California Department of Corrections made a determined effort to purchase used law books for the constitutionally-required prison law libraries at the new High Desert State Prison at Susanville.

"We saw the potential merit, both economically and philosophically, of stocking an entire prison library with used or 'recycled' law books," said Dave Tristan, head of the department's Institutions Division. "Unfortunately the vendor did not live up to its commitments," said Tristan.

Although the vendor, National Law Resource, Inc., guaranteed every book in excellent condition, those that arrived contained:

Contraband material--paper clips, staples and other items that could be fashioned into weapons.

Extraneous papers including personal information--one book contained an entire will with the names and addresses of private citizens.

Serious defects in the books, include:

  • incomplete sets
  • books too worn to withstand heavy inmate use
  • loose, torn, or missing covers and pages
  • broken bindings and significant stains
Corrections returned the first shipment to the vendor. A second shipment, which arrived just days before the prison was to open, included the same serious problems.

"I was forced to redirect library staff from throughout the department to examine the inferior inventory, book by book," said Tristan. "This added $24,000 to the cost of the library," Tristan explained. The vendor also failed to itemize its billings, forcing Corrections to spend an additional 70 hours to verify the expenditures.

Based upon this experience, the department has decided to return to its previous policy of purchasing new books when supplying an entire prison library. "This will ensure that we comply with U.S. Supreme Court requirements," said Tristan. "We will continue to buy used books for replacements whenever possible."

Thursday, May 2, 1996

CORRECTIONS UPHOLDS CONTRACT STANDARDS

Today the Department of Corrections announced that it is withholding payment of $2.0 million to its prime contractor in the development of its inmate tracking computer system. The department has insisted upon contract standards being met in the design phase being developed for its Correctional Management Informational System (CMIS).

Working under the provisions of the contract with TRW, the Department is negotiating to resolve its concerns about the quality of the design phase. In order to comply with the Wilson Administration's policy to ensure efficient and effective management of information technology project development, the Department of Corrections will withhold payment of $2 million to TRW until the second phase specifications of this multi-phase contract meet the requirements of the contract.

"I am committed to ensuring that CDC does not pay for a substandard product," said Corrections Director James H. Gomez. "The Department has every right under the provisions of the contract to demand a complete product and I know that a company with the reputation of TRW will do everything it can to see that our concerns are addressed." The fixed-price contract with TRW calls for the development of a "fully operational" system that will be completed in five major steps: analysis of the departments needs and objectives, design of the project, building the project, documenting and implementing the project and turnover of the completed system to CDC.

To date, CDC has paid out $2 million (less than 5 percent of the contract cost) for the successful completion of the first phase of the project, the analysis phase. This was the first and only product for which TRW has received payment. The analysis phase information has been used in the design phase of the CMIS project.

In March 1995 TRW started the $40.1 million contract, in which they agreed to design and build the system to departmental specifications within 28 months. When completed and operational, CMIS will streamline information management services within the largest correctional system in the country.

In August of 1995, at the end of the analysis phase, CDC met with TRW and identified those issues that may have caused the project to expand beyond what was included in the contract. At that time minor adjustments were made and agreement was reached that the project was within the scope of the contract.

The Department of Corrections, which signed a contract with TRW in December 1994 for the design and development of the CMIS system, has coordinated its oversight of the project with John Thomas Flynn, California's newly appointed Chief Information Officer.

In accordance with the policy established by Flynn, all major computer systems under development in the state have been assigned Independent Validation and Verification (IV&V) contractors, whose job it is to evaluate the projects and report on the feasibility of the primary contractor's plans and budgets. IV&V, which is also commonly called Quality Assurance, is a process that is widely used in the private sector but, until this year, has been under-utilized in state government computer system development.

CDC was the first state agency to hire a "success partner," as part of the IV&V program. The department's success partner, Logicon, a private sector technology company, performs independent verification and validation on the CMIS project. When TRW submitted its design phase deliverable, it was reviewed by CDC staff and Logicon. They found the design specifications submitted by TRW to be incomplete, inaccurate, and inconsistent. A formal letter rejecting the design was sent to TRW on March 22, 1996.

"This is exactly why we have IV&V teams in place--to identify flaws that the primary vendor has missed and the department does not have the expertise to catch," said Flynn. "In the past, this type of 'course correction' would have been very difficult. These types of problems may not have been identified, or if identified, may have been ignored for years, making them exponentially more expensive," Flynn added.

TRW was asked when they would be submitting the properly completed design, which was originally due before December 1, 1995. In response, TRW indicated that it would take them several more months and the entire contract performance would be delayed 13 months. Also, they claimed that the project was going to cost the state an additional $12 million.

Gomez explained that, "To date the state has not been presented with an acceptable reason for the cost increase or all of the time delay." He added that, "TRW is contractually obligated to deliver to the department, a fully operational computer system at the price agreed to in the contract."

The new automated CMIS project was approved by the Department of Finance in 1992 and subsequently funded by the Legislature. The TRW contract is the largest single portion of the project. The remainder of the project development includes establishment of the system and training of staff so that it is fully operational in all of the state's prisons and correctional institutions.

Department of Corrections, the California Department of Information Technology and the Department of General Services are working jointly to ensure the state's interests are protected.

Questions concerning the Department of Information Technology should be directed to Rich Halberg at 657-0318.

Tuesday, April 30, 1996

GOMEZ RESPONDS TO LAO REPORT ON PRISON INDUSTRIES

Corrections Director James H. Gomez today said he was intrigued with the Legislative Analyst's recommendations concerning the state's Prison Industry Authority (PIA).

"From our initial review, it appears that the Legislative Analyst Office (LAO) offers a well-considered vision for the future of prison industries in California," said Gomez, who also is chairman of the 11-member Prison Industry Board (PIB) that oversees PIA.

"The Legislative Analyst acknowledges the improvements PIA has made and offers clear, manageable objectives to carry it into the next century," Gomez said.

The LAO concept for reform is based on Florida's PRIDE model. In that state, prison industries are operated by a private, nonprofit corporation. If the LAO's recommendations are pursued in California, PIA's mission would be twofold: financial self-sufficiency and reduced inmate recidivism.

"While I have not had the opportunity to review the report in detail," said Gomez, "the strategies outlined are very appealing."

"I commend the LAO for their insightful look into the unique, public/private realm of PIA," Gomez continued, "and I look forward to fully exploring the options they present."

Friday, April 26, 1996

CORRECTIONAL OFFICER ARRESTED FOR INMATE ASSAULT

Pelican Bay State Prison Correctional Officer Tab Kimberly Bridges was arrested last night by the Del Norte County Sheriff and charged in the assault of prison inmate Scanvinski Hymes.

Pelican Bay State Prison staff reported the assault to the Del Norte District Attorney and the Sheriff. An internal investigation is underway along with the criminal investigation of the apparently unprovoked attack on inmate Hymes.

Prison staff report that Hymes had been restrained on a gurney yesterday morning after he tried to kick officers on the transportation detail. At the time, Hymes was being processed for transportation to a court appearance in Crescent City.

Hymes earlier had been charged by the District Attorney with assaulting staff at the prison. He had been placed in the Security Housing Unit (SHU) as a result of numerous assaults on staff.

Staff reported that Officer Bridges, who was not a part of the transportation team, approached the inmate on the gurney and began striking him on the back, shoulder, and head with his baton. The inmate was examined, treated for bruises, and returned to his cell.

Inmate Hymes is a 26 year old parole violator with two prior convictions. He first came to state prison in 1988 for possession of a deadly weapon at a California Youth Authority facility. His second term was in 1994 for a felon in possession of a weapon. He has been in and out of prison on parole revocations, most recently for assault and battery and pandering.

Officer Bridges was placed on administrative time off pending the outcome of the internal investigation. He joined the department in December 1982. He transferred to Pelican Bay State Prison in November 1989.

Wednesday, April 24, 1996

CORRECTIONS COLLECTS OVER $1.7 MILLION FOR VICTIMS

The California Department of Corrections will turn over $1,733,728.32 to the State Board of Control for its Crime Victim Compensation Fund this Friday. The money will be used to cover medical costs, mental health treatment, and emergency expenses of California crime victims.

"This represents just four months of collections from state prison inmate wages and trust account deposits," said CDC Director James H. Gomez. "At this rate, we will be able to generate more than $5.5 million for crime victims in 1996 alone."

"It is especially fitting as we commemorate Victims' Rights Week," said Gomez.

The presentation will be held at noon, April 26, during Corrections' Victims' Rights Fair in the atrium of CDC's headquarters building, 1515 S Street. Director Gomez will present the $1.7 million check to Frank Zolin, Executive Officer, State Board of Control. The fair will include displays from 15 organizations serving California's crime victims.

Collections skyrocketed in December 1995 after a new law allowed the department to collect a portion of all trust account deposits for inmates with court-ordered restitution fines. Before then, Corrections could collect from these inmates' wages only.

"Now we need to encourage district attorneys, chief probation officers, and judges to require restitution for all convicted felons," said Gomez.

Currently only about half of the inmates in state prisons have been ordered to pay restitution. "We want to make that 100 percent," said Gomez.

"In my judgment, every single inmate should be required to pay restitution," Gomez continued. "We have the laws, the means, and the will to make it happen."

Tuesday, April 9, 1996

GOMEZ RESPONDS TO PIA AUDIT

Corrections Director James H. Gomez today took issue with findings of a Prison Industry Authority (PIA) audit by the Bureau of State Audits (BSA).

"While the audit offered some helpful recommendations to improve PIA's fiscal management, it uses the wrong yardstick to measure PIA's mission and accomplishments," said Gomez, who is also chairman of the 11-member Prison Industry Board (PIB) that oversees PIA.

"PIA is a unique blend of public and private interests. The true measure of its success is against similar prison industry programs across the nation. In this arena, PIA compares very favorably."

"Instead, the State Auditor made up its own rules to define self sufficiency-- attributing to PIA interest cost it does not incur," said Gomez. "Unfortunately, these rules aren't based on legislative intent, on practices of comparable prison programs, or on generally accepted accounting principles."

"The Bureau of State Audits succumbs to the very inconsistency it attributes to PIA," said Gomez. "First it declares that PIA is a state program; then it compares PIA's performance against private industry standards."

"PIA is doing an excellent job of fulfilling its primary mission--productively employing state prison inmates in a self-sufficient program," Gomez continued. "PIA's inmate employment has grown 117 percent in the last ten years. Furthermore, it has made significant strides in resolving some of the deficiencies pointed out in the audit."

Gomez pointed to numerous PIA accomplishments and innovations:

Increased efficiency. The number of PIA free staff has declined while profits and sales have increased steadily.

Debt reduction. Long-term debt dropped from $13 million to $3.6 million in the last five years.

Automation. Successfully implemented a sophisticated information and accounting system, as noted in the audit.

Improved quality. Using Total Quality Management business process, concentrated on setting quality goals and meeting product standards.

Customer satisfaction. Now guarantees delivery of the most popular furniture items anywhere in the state within 20 days--an accomplishment documented in the audit.

Innovative programs. PIA's highly successful recycling/waste management program has reduced the City of Folsom's waste stream by 55 percent.

Innovative products. Obtained four patents for its Century 2000 modular office system.

Gomez also criticized the audit's findings relating to the Prison Industry Board, charging that it "levels sweeping criticism at PIB" without interviewing the Chairman or interested parties, reviewing pertinent documents, or even attending a PIB meeting.

"Despite the audit's major flaws," said Gomez, "many of its specific recommendations are in line with PIA goals for improvement. I will be working with PIA and the Prison Industry Board to ensure that the progress made to date continues into the next century."

Tuesday, April 2, 1996

MEDIA ACCESS FOR WILLIAMS EXECUTION

The execution of Keith Daniel Williams is scheduled for Friday, May 3, 1996 at San Quentin State Prison. Williams was convicted of murdering three people in Merced County in 1978. He was sentenced to death in April 1979 and has been on California's death row since then.

The California Department of Corrections Communications Office in Sacramento is making arrangements for all media credentials. Contact with San Quentin is not necessary.

This advisory covers media access to prison grounds. The deadline for submittals is Tuesday, April 23, 1996. Up to one hundred twenty-five (125) news media representatives will be admitted to the media center on prison grounds to attend news briefings and a news conference after the execution. Up to seventeen (17) news media representatives will witness the execution as a pool for all media.

Please, no phone calls about selections. You will be notified if there are any problems with your submittal. A list of approved names will be distributed to all media a few days before the scheduled execution.

MEDIA WITNESSES

The Radio Television News Director's Association of Northern California (RTNDA) and the Radio Television News Association in Southern California (RTNA) are responsible for the selection of broadcasters to witness the execution. There are positions for four (4) television and four (4) radio stations. The criteria includes provisions for a selection balance between northern and southern California, that the television stations selections include representation from ABC, CBS, CNN, and NBC news networks, and that one radio and one television be from the county where the crime was committed. The RTNDA contact is Darryl Compton, 415-341-9978. The RTNA contact is Carolyn Fox, 818-986-8168.

The newspaper selection criteria specify a media witness position for the daily newspaper of record with the largest circulation in the county where the crime occurred (i.e. Merced) as well as the largest newspapers in the metropolitan areas of Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco Bay, and Sacramento. Those newspapers are the: Los Angeles Times, San Diego Union-Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle, and Sacramento Bee. Two positions will be chosen at random from California daily newspapers of record with 100,000 circulation and above that have applied for credentials by April 23.

NON-WITNESS MEDIA ATTENDING PRESS CONFERENCE

To accommodate as many media firms as possible, each news media organization applying will be limited to one reporter. Firms selected to send a representative to witness the execution will be allowed a separate reporter for the media center.

In anticipation that interest will exceed space, pool arrangements will be necessary for video/audio feeds, and still photos. The pool will be limited to two television camera operators, two still photographers, and one audio engineer.

Broadcast microwave and satellite vans and their support personnel will be permitted in a parking lot adjacent to the IST building. Space is limited to about 30 vehicles. Priority will be given to those sending "live" reports serving LA and Bay area media and multiple stations statewide. Television vans will be allowed up to four (4) support personnel (engineer, producer, talent, and camera operator) in addition to the reporter for the media center. Radio broadcast vans will be allowed three (3) support personnel (engineer, producer, and talent) in addition to the media center reporter.

To be considered, send written notification signed by the news department manager on company letterhead with the names of the proposed representatives, their dates of birth, driver's license numbers, social security numbers and size of vehicle (for broadcast van access) to:

CDC Communications
1515 S Street, Room 113-S
P.O. Box 942883
Sacramento, CA 94283-0001

Fax or telephone requests will not be accepted. All requests must be received no later than 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 23. Given the time needed for security clearances and access permits for this number of people which have to be completed, requests received after April 23, including personnel substitutions, will be processed only if time permits and after the initial requests are completed. No assurances can be provided that the processing for late requests will be completed by May 3. Requests that include the names of more than the allotted number of representatives will be returned without processing.

The building being used for the media center has 60 amp electrical service with a limited number of outlets. There are seven (7) pay telephones. The media pool will be responsible for providing a generator for electrical power and for any special telephone provisions. Media orders for private telephone hookups must be arranged in advance with Pacific Telephone which will coordinate installation with San Quentin.

Wednesday, March 13, 1996

CORRECTIONS CUTS WORKERS' COMPENSATION COSTS

The California Department of Corrections (CDC) has experienced a significant reduction in paid workers' compensation medical and Industrial Disability Leave (IDL) costs over the last three fiscal years.

"Our department appears to have the lowest paid workers' compensation costs as a percentage of payroll of any major law enforcement or 24-hour care department in the state system," said CDC Director James H. Gomez.

According to the preliminary data from the Department of Personnel Administration, Corrections has shown a significant reduction in annual paid IDL and workers' compensation medical costs over the last several fiscal years. During the same time, the department's payroll increased by nearly 31%.

Annual paid IDL costs have decreased over $2 million since fiscal year 1992-93, to just over $10.5 million in fiscal year 1994-95. IDL is the benefit paid to state employees during any temporary disability lasting up to two years from the date of injury.

Paid workers' compensation medical costs in fiscal year 1994-95 were just under $23.5 million, down over $1.5 million from fiscal year 1992-93 levels. CDC's paid workers' compensation costs as a percentage of payroll in fiscal year 1994-95 decreased to 3.8%, down from 5% in fiscal year 1992-93.

CDC has reduced its workers' compensation costs largely as a result of an aggressive claims management program initiated in 1991. At that time, the department established full-time Return to Work Coordinator positions at each institution to manage claims on site, working directly with disabled employees. The new people also have developed monitoring techniques to better manage older cases and bring them to closure sooner through a fast-track settlement process.

This approach was especially successful at the Correctional Training Facility (CTF) in Soledad. Over the last three fiscal years, the prison's annual paid costs dropped nearly $2 million and its annual IDL costs were cut nearly in half.

"Because of our efforts, employees are returning to work sooner, claims are being settled faster, and the hardship suffered by injured employees is minimized," said Gomez.

"This is a 'win-win' situation for both staff and management. We are able to take care of the needs of staff and reduce costs at the same time," said Gomez.

"Our success has been a team effort," Gomez contined. "We couldn't have done it without the dedicated efforts of the prison Return To Work Coordinators, by management's ongoing commitment to reduce costs, and by the active involvement of the State Compensation Insurance Fund."

CORRECTIONS BREAKS INCOME TAX FRAUD RING

The California Department of Corrections (CDC) today announced it has broken a large inmate conspiracy to defraud the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

"I want to give credit to our professional staff who uncovered this criminal activity last November, and worked diligently and professionally to identify those responsible," said CDC Director James H. Gomez. "We are working actively with federal investigators to have the inmates and their crime partners outside the prison charged and prosecuted."

Twenty five (25) inmates at the California Men's Colony (CMC) at San Luis Obispo have been identified as suspects. Six are charged with organizing the conspiracy to defraud the government. Nineteen (19) are being charged with filing one or more fraudulent Federal Income Tax returns.

Inmates filed phony income tax returns and with help from friends and relatives outside of the prison cashed refund checks and divided the money. A total of 48 fraudulent tax returns claiming $122,000 in refunds has been traced to the inmates by the IRS. About $44,000 is believed to have been paid by IRS.

The conspiracy was uncovered in November by CMC prison investigators. To avoid jeopardizing a joint investigation with the Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigations Unit, no action was taken against inmate suspects until this week. This week 25 inmate suspects were rounded up at the prison and confined to cells away from the rest of the prison population.

Tuesday, March 5, 1996

CORRECTIONS CALLS ON SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION TO STOP PAYMENTS TO PRISON INMATES

California Department of Corrections (CDC) Director James Gomez today called on the Social Security Administration (SSA) to focus on ending improper benefit payments to California prison inmates like serial killer William Bonin who received SSA benefits right up until he was executed February 23.

Bonin's social security number was provided to SSA in 1982, shortly after he arrived on death row, and again in August, 1990 when the social security number of every CDC inmate was provided to SSA. Criminal records show Bonin has used only one social security number.

"I am appalled to learn that despite all of our efforts, this serial killer was getting money from Social Security during the 14 years he was on death row," said CDC Director James Gomez. "The Social Security Administration should have stopped Bonin's checks long ago."

Social Security administrators in San Francisco indicate the benefit checks were deposited in a southern California bank in an account Bonin shared with a person SSA refused to identify.

"I sincerely hope that the federal government intends to prosecute whoever was helping a man who killed 14 children cash these checks. We will continue to provide full support to SSA so it can stop benefits to prison inmates," said Gomez.

Social Security administrators yesterday asked for an updated list of condemned inmates in California and their social security numbers. CDC immediately provided SSA with that list.

Since 1981, CDC has been providing the SSA the names and social security numbers of California prison inmates. A part of the agreement permits Social Security to share the information with the Veteran's Administration (VA) to prevent inmates from getting veteran's benefits illegally.

"We are doing everything possible to stop inmates from getting illegal payments from Social Security and the VA," said CDC Director James Gomez. "Besides providing Social Security with information, staff are instructed to intercept all government checks being mailed to inmates to determine if they are entitled to the money."

Each quarter, social security numbers of new inmates in the system are provided to Social Security's headquarters in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1990, the California Department of Corrections provided a computer tape containing the social security numbers of the more than 83,000 inmates then in state prison.

Wednesday, February 28, 1996

FEDERAL COURT DISMISSES HARASSMENT CASE AGAINST CORRECTIONS DEPARTMENT

U.S. District Court Judge David Levi dismissed in its entirety a sexual harassment lawsuit brought by seven Folsom State Prison employees in 1993.

In ruling for the California Department of Corrections, the court found that the plaintiffs failed to produce evidence or raise a genuine issue that the Department had a pattern or policy of gender-based discrimination.

"When we feel we've been wrongly accused," said Corrections Director James H. Gomez, "we defend ourselves."

"I abhor any form of gender discrimination and have moved aggressively to root it out and punish it," Gomez explained. "We will continue our efforts to create a positive, discrimination-free work environment for all Corrections employees."

Judge Levi's 166-page order dismissed all claims against the department and the employees named in the lawsuit. The Department of Corrections was represented by the private law firm Kronick, Moskovitz, Tiedemann and Girard.

The seven plaintiffs were: Marcia Diaz, Crystal Davis, Kathie Dunham, Tiffany Keeney, Jayna Popovich, Carmen Rojas and Yvette Taylor.

Tuesday, February 20, 1996

MEDIA ACCESS FOR EXECUTION

The California Department of Corrections has completed processing security clearances for media firms requesting to send representatives to San Quentin State Prison for the February 23 execution of William George Bonin.

This advisory constitutes clearance for the individuals listed on the attached.

The following information should be distributed to all media representatives that will be involved as witnesses or participants of the news conference at San Quentin State Prison.

On February 22, media may enter the West Gate of San Quentin between 7 a.m. and 2 p.m. For security purposes, two forms of identification will be required. One must be an official photo id such as driver's license, passport, or state-issued identification card. Only those credentialed for the news conference will be permitted. Any media representative that leaves the prison after 2 p.m. will not be permitted to return at a later time that day.

Media witnesses to the execution may enter as late as 5 p.m. through the West Gate of the prison.

Do not wear blue, black, or gray denim clothing or yellow raincoats. It is illegal to bring alcohol, drugs, or weapons into a California State Prison. Vehicles and individuals entering a California State Prison are subject to search.

Private vehicles, except for designated microwave or satellite broadcast trucks, will be parked near the West Gate. After credentials are confirmed, reporters will be transported by prison shuttle to the Media Center.

A video/audio feed for broadcasters of the media witness news conference is limited to 2 camera operators and 2 audio technicians. The broadcast vans facilitating distribution of the feed will be parked closest to the building.

Media movement will be restricted to the Media Center (IST building) and broadcast support area. No access will be permitted to the East Gate.

Still photos of the news conference will be provided by an Associated Press pool photographer.

Media witnesses to the execution will be escorted to the IST building immediately after leaving the witness observation area. Media witnesses must agree to make themselves available to members of the pool for interviews after the initial press conference.

Media organizations selected to send witnesses as representatives of the media pool are Associated Press; United Press International; San Diego Union-Tribune; Los Angeles Times; San Francisco Chronicle; Sacramento Bee; Orange County Register; Los Angeles Daily News; Long Beach Press-Telegram; KNBC-TV (NBC) Los Angeles; KCAL-TV (CNN), Los Angeles; KNX radio, Los Angeles; KFI radio, Los Angeles; KPIX-TV (CBS), San Francisco; KGO radio, San Francisco; KQED radio, San Francisco; and KXTV-TV (ABC), Sacramento.

The media pool is making arrangements for a catering truck and a power generator. Access should be coordinated with pool organizers, NorCal RTNDA Darryl Compton at (415) 341-9978 or SoCal RTNA Carolyn Fox at (818) 986-8168

The IST building has 60 amp electrical service with a limited number of outlets. There are 7 pay telephones.

Friday, February 16, 1996

MEDIA ACCESS FOR EXECUTION

The California Department of Corrections is processing security clearances for media firms requesting to send representatives to San Quentin State Prison for the February 23 execution of William Bonin.

The following information should be distributed to all media representatives that will be involved as witnesses or participants of the news conference at San Quentin State Prison.

On February 22, media may enter the West Gate of San Quentin between 7:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. For security purposes, two forms of identification will be required. One must be an official photo ID such as driver's license, passport, or state-issued identification card. Only those credentialed for the news conference will be permitted. Any media representative that leaves the prison after 2:00 p.m. will not be permitted to return at a later time that day.

Media witnesses to the execution may enter as late as 5:00 p.m. through the West Gate of the prison.

Do not wear blue, black, or gray denim clothing or yellow raincoats. It is illegal to bring alcohol, drugs, or weapons into a California State Prison. Vehicles and individuals entering a California State Prison are subject to search.

Private vehicles, except for designated microwave or satellite broadcast trucks, will be parked near the West Gate. After credentials are confirmed, reporters will be transported by prison shuttle to the Media Center.

A video/audio feed for broadcasters of the media witness news conference is limited to 2 camera operators and 2 audio technicians. The broadcast vans facilitating distribution of the feed will be parked closest to the building.

Media movement will be restricted to the Media Center (IST building) and broadcast support area. No access will be permitted to the East Gate.

Still photos of the news conference will be provided by an Associated Press pool photographer.

Media witnesses to the execution will be escorted to the IST building immediately after leaving the witness observation area. Media witnesses must agree to make themselves available to members of the pool for interviews after the initial press conference.

Media organizations selected to send witnesses as representatives of the media pool are Associated Press; United Press International; San Diego Union-Tribune; Los Angeles Times; San Francisco Chronicle; Sacramento Bee; Orange County Register; Los Angeles Daily News; Long Beach Press-Telegram; KNBC-TV (NBC) Los Angeles; KCAL-TV (CNN) Los Angeles; KNX radio Los Angeles; KFI radio Los Angeles; KPIX TV (CBS) San Francisco; KGO radio San Francisco; KQED radio San Francisco; and KXTV-TV (ABC) Sacramento.

The media pool is making arrangements for a catering truck and a power generator. Access should be coordinated with pool organizers, NorCal RTNDA Darryl Compton at (415) 341-9978 or SoCal RTNA Carolyn Fox at (818) 986-8168

The IST building has 60 amp electrical service with a limited number of outlets. There are 7 pay telephones. Media orders for private telephone hookups must be arranged with Pacific Telephone.

Questions should be directed to Tip Kindel or Christine May at the Department of Corrections Headquarters at (916) 445-4950.

Media firms requesting credentials will be notified by telephone or tele-fax Tuesday, February 20, of representatives authorized to enter San Quentin on February 22.

AUTHORIZED ACCESS TO SAN QUENTIN

The following individuals have been cleared for access to San Quentin State Prison for the execution of William Bonin. A few more security clearances are underway; media representatives not noted on the attached list will be notified of their status on Tuesday, February 20.

The execution is scheduled to take place at 12:01 a.m. Friday, February 23. Media may enter the West Gate as early as 7 a.m. and no later than 2 p.m. on Thursday, February 22.