Wednesday, December 29, 1999

Media Policies - Adult Institutions

California correctional facilities and programs are operated at public expense for the protection of society. The public has a right and a duty to know how such facilities and programs are being operated. It is the policy of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) to make known to the public through the news media all relevant information pertaining to operations of the department and facilities.

Following is a summary of California regulations and department policies and procedures regarding media access and activities. The complete regulations are found in the California Code of Regulations Title 15, Sections 3260 through 3267, found at this link: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Regulations/Adult_Operations/docs/Title152006Final.pdf

Authorized Release of Information

The following data that may be released about an inmate or parolee includes:

  • Name
  • Age
  • Birthplace
  • Place of previous residence
  • Commitment information
  • Facility assignments and behavior
  • General state of health
  • Cause of death
  • Nature of injury or critical illness (unless the condition is related to the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome)
  • Sentencing and release actions.
CDCR employee data that may be released includes:

  • Name
  • Civil service classification
  • Age
  • Work assignment
  • Length of service with the department and/or current division or unit
  • Past work assignments
  • Role or function in a newsworthy event
Media Access to Facilities

Access to adult CDCR facilities or contract facilities - prisons, community correctional facilities, re-entry facilities, prisoner mother facilities, and camps - and other CDCR offices including parole offices, requires prior approval of the institution head and the press secretary of the CDCR Office of Public and Employee Communications.

Within a facility, media representatives shall be under the direct supervision of the public information officer or his/her designee.

Media representatives cannot enter security housing units (SHU), condemned units (death row), the execution chamber, Administrative Segregation Units (AdSeg or ASU) or any area currently affected by an emergency without approval of the CDCR Secretary, the Director of the Division of Adult Institutions, or designee.

There may be limited access to other areas. These may include control booths, guard towers, protective housing units, reception centers, and units housing mentally, seriously or terminally ill inmates.

Media representatives need to supply a full name, date of birth, social security number and driver's license number to process a security clearance for access to an institution. Media representatives from outside the United States need to supply a full name, date of birth and passport information. If it is a breaking story, media representatives may be allowed access to an area outside the secure perimeter of the facility.

Requests to attend life prisoner parole hearings are handled by the Board of Parole Hearings at (916) 323-2993.

Writing, Telephoning and Visiting an Inmate

Media representatives may contact any state prison inmate by mail. It is not necessary for media to notify CDCR before communicating with an inmate. Incoming letters are opened, inspected for contraband, subject to be read, and then forwarded to the inmate. To ensure prompt processing, mail the letter to the inmate using his/her full name and CDC number in care of the institution where he/she is incarcerated. To get an inmate's CDC number, call the Inmate Check Line at (916) 557-5933. You must have the correct date of birth to obtain the CDC number.

Most inmates have access to telephones and can make outgoing collect calls on designated telephones according to their privilege group. Limitations are placed on the frequency of such calls to allow equal access to telephones by all inmates. When corresponding with an inmate, media representatives may provide a telephone number where an inmate can call them collect. It is up to the inmate to initiate the call. No restriction is placed on the identity or relationship to the inmate of the person called providing the person agrees to accept all charges for the call. Telephone calls are limited to 15 minutes and may be recorded. Media representatives may also record the call with the inmate's permission. Messages will not be taken by staff to inmates.

All inmates are allowed visits with approved visitors. If a media representative wishes to visit an inmate, write to the inmate and ask him/her to send you a CDC Form 106, Visiting Questionnaire. Your completed questionnaire must be submitted and approved by the institution before your visit. The application process takes about 30 working days. All approved visitors - friend, relative, attorney, or member of the media - may visit; however, they may not bring in cameras or recording devices. The institution will provide, upon request, pencil and paper to an adult visitor as needed. For more information about visiting, call the toll-free CDCR Visiting Information number at 1-800-374-8474 or go to this link: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Visitors/index.html

Media Interviews

Media representatives can interview inmates or parolees randomly and random or specific-person face-to-face interviews with staff. Such interviews may be restricted by time, place, duration, and the number of people in a media crew.

Random interviews of inmates involved in a specific activity or program, or encountered while covering a facility activity or event, shall be limited to the time, areas and segments of the facility population designated by the institution head.

Inmates may not participate in specific-person, face-to-face interviews. No inmate, parolee or staff shall be interviewed against their will.

Use of cameras or recording devices inside an institution or on state property requires prior approval.

A CDC Form 146, Inmate Declaration To News Media Contact, shall be completed whenever an inmate is the subject of a still, motion picture or other recording intended for use by a television or radio station, or newspaper, magazine or other publication.

Media interviews shall not be permitted with an inmate suffering from a mental illness when, in the opinion of a psychiatrist or psychologist, the inmate is not capable of giving informed consent.

Controlled access may be permitted to seriously or terminally ill patients and their housing areas.

Media representatives or their organization may be required to pay the security or escort costs provided for interviews.

Cameras and Other Audio or Visual Recording Devices

Possession of any camera, wireless microphone or other recording device within a CDCR facility is prohibited unless specifically authorized by the institution head. A location agreement and a film permit from the California Film Commission may be required for filming on state property.

An inmate's consent is not required in settings like an exercise yard or dining hall where individuals are not singled out or where an inmate's identity is not revealed. Before such shots are taken however, inmates shall be advised so those who do not want to be recognized may turn away or leave the area.

Unless there is a specified threat of imminent danger to an inmate or parolee by releasing their photograph, media representatives shall be permitted access to identification photographs (mug shots) without the inmate's or parolee's consent.

Staff cannot prohibit a person who is not on state property from photographing, filming, video taping or otherwise recording any department facilities, employees, inmates, parolees or equipment.

Non-News Access to CDC Facilities

All non-news motion picture, radio, or television programs produced at any CDCR facility must have prior approval. For definition purposes, non-news related productions include features, documentaries, news magazine programs, commercials, and pilots for proposed news, public information, religious and entertainment television programs.

The process for approval consideration begins with a written request to the CDCR Press Office. The request should include:

  • Details of the project and production location needs
  • Production schedule and duration
  • Crew size
  • Any access to inmates
  • Script sections that pertain to CDCR
  • Scenes to be filmed inside a CDCR facility
  • Type/quantity of production equipment on premises
  • Any satellite or microwave transmission from a CDCR facility
If project approval is given, a location agreement must be executed with the parent firm and a California Film Commission permit (http://www.film.ca.gov/state/film/film_homepage.jsp) will be required along with evidence of financial responsibility and liability insurance in the amount of at least $1 million with the State of California, its offices, employees, and agents as the "additional insureds." Part of the agreement provides for defending and indemnifying the State against any lawsuits. Another part of the agreement also states that the parent firm is responsible for reasonable staffing costs, including benefits and overtime rates of pay, directly associated with its filming activities.

Editorial researchers, freelance writers, authors of books, independent filmmakers, and other unaccredited media must provide proof of employment by an accredited publication/production company, or have evidence that an accredited publication/production company has contracted to purchase the completed project.

Inmates may not participate in specific-person, face-to-face interviews. Random face-to-face interviews may be permitted with inmates as stipulated by the location agreement.

Please allow a minimum of 20 working days for the least complicated request. There are no assurances that access will be granted; however, CDCR does try to accommodate requests within available resources consistent with the safe and secure operations of its institutions and California law.

CDCR Press Office (916) 445-4950

The Press Office, located at CDCR headquarters in Sacramento, articulates the Department's position on issues, manages crisis communications, solicits media coverage of departmental activities, serves as a liaison to the media, and releases information to the public. The Press Office responds to media requests made under the California Public Records Act.

The Press Office also provides other services to media:

Inmate Check Line

Media representatives needing information about a convicted felon sent to state prison in California can call the Press Office's Inmate Check Line. To request whether an individual has been sent to state prison, call (916) 557-5933. Please provide the full name and either the date of birth or the CDC number. Sentencing and/or release information will be faxed within 24 hours.

Stock Video Footage and Still Photographs

The Office of Public and Employee Communications maintains a library of stock video footage and still photographs and makes these available to the media upon request. There is current and archived footage and photographs of correctional facilities and programs, including restricted or limited access areas such as control booths, guard towers, the execution chamber, death row, and Administrative Segregation and Security Housing Units.

Media Inquiries

The Press Office researches and responds to inquiries from the media. Facts are gathered as quickly as possible and provided to the inquirer. If the requested facts are not known or are otherwise unavailable, the inquirer shall be informed and the reasons therefore.

Frequently asked questions about CDCR can be found on the CDCR Website

Press advisories and releases are posted on the CDCR website at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/News/2007_Press_Releases/index.html

Statistics and information about capital punishment are found at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Reports_Research/capital.html

The weekly population reports for adult prisoners and adult parolees are found at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Reports_Research/Offender_Information_Services_Branch/Population_Reports.asp

There are other reports about adult inmates and parolees, including characteristics, recidivism rates, behavior, time served and historical trends. There are also reports about DNA sampling and inmates serving three-strikes sentences. These reports can be found on the Offender Information Reports page.

Media Access to Scheduled Executions

CDCR's Press Office processes all media requests for access to San Quentin State Prison to cover scheduled executions. The Press Office also coordinates media requests to witness executions.

Escapes

In the event of an actual or suspected escape, the public information officer or designee shall notify radio and television stations and newspapers in the surrounding communities and the missing inmate's home community. The prison will provide the missing inmate's physical description, estimated time of disappearance, an identification photograph, the facility's search efforts and cooperation with law enforcement agencies.

Monday, December 27, 1999

Year 2000 Readiness Reached At California Department of Corrections

The California Department of Corrections is remediated for Year 2000 readiness, including all mission critical systems and essential business services.

“We have made Y2K a top priority for the past two years in our efforts to ensure a smooth transition to the new millennium and those efforts have paid off,” says CDC Director C.A. “Cal” Terhune.

CDC has worked closely with the state Department of Information Technology (DOIT) throughout its remediation and readiness process, and DOIT recently determined that the Department was 100 percent complete in its identification, remediation and preparedness of mission critical systems and essential business services.

This process included testing and remediation, if necessary, of the following systems:

  • Distributed desktop system comprised of 16,500 personal computers;
  • Vast information technology systems that store and track offender and business databases and process reports; and
  • Embedded systems comprised of over 19,000 devices or systems.
In addition, CDC has completed a process that resulted in the development of a detailed plan for continuity of critical business functions for each functional unit within the Department. Each institution has developed an emergency operations plan and has tested these plans in exercise drills.

Because safety and security of the community, staff and inmates are the Department’s mission, the highest priority has been given to ensuring that all systems within the state’s 33 prisons are Y2K ready.

“Prison cell doors will not pop open due to a computer glitch,” says Terhune. “While some state prisons are more ‘electronic’ than others, the electric switch is still operated by a human being.” Terhune added that all inmates in the state’s correctional system will be locked in their cells on December 31, beginning at 3 p.m., and continuing until the next morning to limit inmate movement and allow staff greater flexibility in dealing with any Y2K-related issues that may arise.

As part of the Department’s preparedness effort, it will monitor its operations during the rollover period through its headquarters staff in Sacramento, beginning at 6 p.m. on December 31, 1999 for 72 hours or until all Y2K related issues have been resolved. These emergency operations centers will be monitored by a main emergency operations center operated by CDC headquarters and linked to the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services and DOIT.

Thursday, November 18, 1999

FACTS ABOUT YEAR 2000 READINESS Mission Critical Systems Top Priority

The California Department of Corrections (CDC) is on target for Y2K readiness.

CDC has made Y2K remediation and readiness a top priority. This includes all its mission critical information technology (IT), desktop and embedded systems, as well as continuity planning for business. The state Department of Information Technology has determined that CDC’s mission critical systems are 100 percent remediated as of November 15, 1999. In addition, all Y2K readiness training and testing have been completed.

The safety and security of California communities near correctional institutions operated by the California Department of Corrections will not be jeopardized in any way due to possible Year 2000 issues.

Many of California’s prisons were built before the computer age and even those that have been built within the last decade still rely on human judgement and manual manipulation. While many cell doors use power or simple electric components, they are not opened and closed by computers. If power or the electric component in a cell door failed, the doors would remain closed without manual intervention. Manual backups and workarounds exist for equipment that is vulnerable to failure. Backup generators are in place in each institution to ensure continued power for essential operations. In addition, provisions and supplies have been stored to ensure staff and inmates will be provided for in the event that other utilities or vendor deliveries are temporarily disrupted. Finally, inmates will be locked in their cells by 6 p.m. on December 31, 1999, allowing staff on duty to focus attention on resolving any potential Y2K disruption without concern over inmate movement. Additional staff will be scheduled to work that night and continue for as long as necesssary to ensure that any Y2K-related issue is dealt with as quickly and efficiently as possible.

The California Department of Corrections has planned for mission critical business operations in the event of any Y2K-related disruptions.
Each major functional unit in CDC has developed detailed plans for the continuity of critical business functions. This means that every working unit within the Department with mission critical systems and high priority business activities has drafted a Y2K contingency plan to provide a roadmap on how they will operate critical business functions in the event of a Y2K-related problem. In addition, all institutions within the Department have developed Y2K specific emergency operations plans. Staff training and plan testing has been conducted for each of these institutions across the state.

The California Department of Corrections’ embedded systems have been identified and remediation is ongoing in a phased effort that focuses on mission critical systems first.

CDC has over 19,000 devices or systems in its database of embedded systems. To date, almost 18,000 of these have been determined to be Y2K compliant or not affected by the millennium bug. Slightly more than 400 of these devices or systems were found to be non-compliant, and their remediation is now in final stages of completion. Any critical systems not remediated by the year’s end will have backup or workaround systems in place. The remaining items are of low priority, such as office equipment. They are not critical to Department operations and will be addressed as time permits.

The California Department of Corrections’ distributed desktop system has undergone remediation in preparation for Y2K.

CDC has approximately 16,500 personal computers that comprise the basis of its distributed desktop system. This systemThese personal computers were was slated for remediation in two phases. First, all personal computers tied to mission critical systems received focused attention and their were remediated by September 26, 1999. ion will be completed by year’s end. Once that has been accomplished, CDC staff are now focused will focus on remediation of locally developed spreadsheets and databases, along with the remediation/replacement of personal computers deemed to be non-mission critical.

The California Department of Corrections’ Y2K readiness initiative has effectively remediated its vast IT systems.

These are a few of CDC’s huge mainframe mission critical systems that house its large databases, including the following:that have completed their remediation and testing efforts for Year 2000:

  • OBIS (Offender Based Information System) – CDC’s longest-lived primary offender data management system that serves as the Department’s official source of offender information to external entities. OBIS is the only system that houses information on offenders throughout their time in the correctional system from commitment to final discharge.
  • DDPS (Distributed Data Processing System) – Hewlett Packard minicomputers form this system, which connects all 33 state prisons and central office functions using applications that track inmate movements and housing, inmate classification levels, monies and restitution fines, tuberculosis test results, visitors and inmate visits and canteen and inventory sales.
  • Interim Parolee Tracking System (IPTS) – This multi-user system captures, stores and manages information relating to inmates paroled from state prison.
  • Parole Revocation Hearing Tracking System (RTS) – This system provides information on all parolees (1) while under a CDC hold or (2) a discovery of the violation and a hold was not placed until a revocation decision by the Board of Prison Terms was finalized. A record is created for each CDC parolee arrested and is maintained and updated in the RTS active database until the board decision is finalized, at which time the record is transferred and stored.
  • Parolee at Large Recovery Tracking System (PALRTS) – This system provides an efficient method of capturing and reporting data including the identification, location and activities leading to the apprehension of parolees at large.
The California Department of Corrections has plans to monitor activities beginning at 6 p.m. on December 31, 1999 to track and respond to any Y2K related problems that may arise. This monitoring will continue for 72 hours or until all Y2K-related issues have been resolved.

CDC will establish its Emergency Operations Center (EOC) for its headquarters operation, where it will monitor activities throughout the state. Each of the Department’s correctional institutions will operate emergency operations centers that will link with the Department’s EOC. Each institution will report in to the Department’s EOC on its Y2K status. The Department’s EOC will link with the state’s master Emergency Operations Center operated by the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services.

"FOLLOW THE SUN" CDC participates in state's effort to track Y2K

To read this article Click Here.

Wednesday, October 20, 1999

STAFF AND INMATES TO BE TESTED FOR TUBERCULOSIS AT NORTHERN CALIFORNIA WOMEN'S FACILITY IN STOCKTON

Sacramento – The California Department of Corrections (CDC) announced today that staff and inmates at the Northern California Women's Facility (NCWF) in Stockton will be tested for tuberculosis following yesterday's discovery of one possible tuberculosis case.

"This is not a confirmed case of tuberculosis," said Dr. Susann Steinberg, Deputy Director of CDC's Health Care Services Division. "However, as a precaution, we will begin testing staff and inmates, restricting inmate movement, and proceeding with our established protocols in responding to this situation. We do not wait for a confirmed diagnosis before taking vigorous action to protect the health and safety of staff, inmates and the community."

On October 19, one inmate was transferred from NCWF to an approved correctional medical isolation unit for further testing related to possible tuberculosis.

Beginning today, October 20, inmates and staff will be tested for exposure to tuberculosis. NCWF also is:

  • Limiting inmate movement,
  • Suspending visiting today until further notice,
  • Notifying all staff and inmates about the tuberculosis testing process,
  • Performing a contact investigation to identify staff and inmates who may have had close contact with the suspected inmate, and
  • Not receiving any new inmates.
Steinberg said that correctional settings are considered high-risk environments for transmission of tuberculosis infection and disease. "Inmates often have had little or no health care prior to their incarceration. Many have compromised immune systems or suffer from chronic illnesses such as hepatitis or AIDS. CDC is very committed to preventing and controlling tuberculosis infection and disease," she said.

All employees of CDC and all inmates are tested annually for tuberculosis. All new employees, whether they will work in a correctional facility or not, are tested prior to their employment with the Department and are re-tested annually. All incoming inmates also are tested upon arrival to a CDC institution. CDC currently employs 45,726 people and houses 162,040 inmates.

Visiting operations may continue to be impacted. Those with questions about visiting NCWF can call 209-943-1600.

NCWF is a medium security prison located in Stockton and serves as a reception center for female parole violators returned to custody from Northern California counties. The prison opened July 1987, currently houses 700 female inmates, and employs about 260 people.

Monday, October 18, 1999

Staff and Inmates to be Tested for Tuberculosis at California State Prison - Solano

Sacramento – As a precaution, California State Prison-Solano (CSP-Solano) in Vacaville is preparing to test all staff and inmates for tuberculosis following the discovery of two possible cases of tuberculosis, California Department of Corrections (CDC) officials announced today.

On October 8 and 14, two inmates were transferred to an approved correctional medical isolation unit for further testing related to possible tuberculosis. They are currently undergoing tests and have not been confirmed as contagious.

"These two cases have not been confirmed at this time," said Steven Cambra, CDC Chief Deputy Director of Field Operations. "However, because the prison has two possible cases, we are redirecting medical resources and restricting all inmate movement so that the testing can be completed quickly."

Beginning the week of October 18, all staff and inmates will be tested for exposure to tuberculosis which may take up to 10 days. To facilitate the testing, CSP-Solano is:

  • Suspending routine programs during the test period,
  • Suspending visiting immediately until further notice,
  • Notifying all inmates about the tuberculosis testing process on the institution television education channel,
  • Performing contact investigations to identify staff and inmates who may have had close contact with the two suspected inmates,
  • Not receiving any new inmates, and
  • Not transferring any inmates.
"I want to emphasize that there are no confirmed cases of tuberculosis at CSP-Solano," Cambra said. "However, we do not want to wait for a confirmed diagnosis before responding. We are taking proactive precautionary measures to ensure the health and safety of staff, inmates and the community."

Cambra said that CDC is committed to preventing and controlling tuberculosis infection. All 45,726 CDC employees and 162,040 inmates are tested annually for tuberculosis.

After the first suspected inmate was discovered on October 8, 286 inmates were tested for tuberculosis exposure. All the tests were negative. No confirmed cases were discovered from the contact investigation either.

Visiting operations may continue to be impacted next week. The CSP-Solano visitor information telephone number is 1-800-374-VISIT.

CSP-Solano is a medium security prison located near Vacaville. The prison opened in August of 1984, currently houses approximately 5,800 inmates and employs about 1,400 people.

California Department of Corrections Takes Positive Actions After Power Outage

Responding to a need for improved response to a loss of electrical power at Wasco State Prison last April, the California Department of Corrections (CDC) has instituted a major program of enhancements to ensure that all state prisons are responsive to emergencies caused by sudden power outages.

"Because we are committed to the safety and security of the public, staff and inmates, we learned a great deal from this situation of last April and even more from some recent findings by the Bureau of State Audits," said CDC Director C.A. "Cal" Terhune. "We began to examine our response to the outage immediately and began to identify some changes we needed to make. However, the audit provided us with more useful information we are in the process of incorporating into our improvements."

On April 12, 1999, a high voltage transformer failed at Wasco State Prison, causing a power outage that lasted, at least in part, for several hours. Full power was restored to the institution by the following day. Failure of the transformer led to an electrical problem that prevented the institution’s backup generator system from functioning properly. However, power to the institution’s electrified fence was was not affected by the outage, maintaining a safe perimeter between the institution and the surrounding community. No inmate injuries were reported and one staff injury was minor.

The Bureau of State Audits review of Wasco State Prison’s response to the power outage was requested by Assemblyman Dean Florez, D-Shafter.

Immediately after the power outage, CDC and Wasco State Prison staff began their own review of this matter and began the process of developing new policies and procedures to ensure a seamless response to any future power outage incidents.

Additionally, a subsequent power outage in the final days of the state audit caused by a lightning strike resulted in a completely appropriate response by all Wasco State Prison backup systems and staff.

In addition, the audit found one instance in which an inmate gained access to confidential information. Wasco State Prison’s response to this finding was to take corrective action with supervisors and managers to address any oversights in their supervision, and then to develop policies and procedures governing the safeguard of confidential information.

Friday, October 8, 1999

CDC Opens Its First Family Foundations Program Facility

The California Department of Corrections (CDC) formally opened its first Family Foundations Program facility today, in Santa Fe Springs, Los Angeles County. The Department hosted a ribbon- cutting ceremony and facility tours. Speakers included Youth and Adult Correctional Agency Secretary Robert Presley, CDC Director C.A. Terhune, and other dignitaries.

The Family Foundations Program is the only alternative sentencing program for women in California administered by CDC who are non-violent offenders with histories of drug abuse. Women must be pregnant or parenting a child under age six. The mother spends 12 months in this highly structured residential treatment program followed by a 12-month aftercare/transition period to help her successfully re-enter society. Currently, there are nine women and their children housed at the facility, which has a capacity of 35 women and 40 children.

As a State Senator, Presley sponsored legislation in 1994 establishing The Pregnant and Parenting Women’s Alternative Sentencing Program Act.

"This alternative sentencing holds women accountable for their criminal behavior while affording parent and child a chance to lead more healthy and productive lives, as the mother completes her sentence," Presley said at today’s dedication.

On-site services include parenting skills development, health services, child development services, and vocational skills training. Residents have the benefit of support groups and assistance to establish and enhance close ties with their young children. Additionally, the mothers share cooking and cleaning chores and learn life skills to help improve their employability.

CDC selected the City of Santa Fe Springs for the first Family Foundations Program residential facility. Two additional facilities in San Diego and Fresno are slated to open next year.

Friday, September 24, 1999

Wednesday, September 22, 1999

CDC INVESTIGATION LEADS TO NUMEROUS CHARGES AGAINST EMPLOYEES

Sacramento—The California Department of Corrections (CDC) has launched an aggressive investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct among staff and inmates at its four women’s prisons.

Five employees have resigned under the intense scrutiny and another dozen are the focus of investigation at the California Institution for Women in Frontera (CIW). CDC officials expect the investigation could broaden to include up to 40 more staff at CIW alone. A search of a housing unit at the prison Tuesday, Sept. 21, yielded additional evidence.

"From the day Governor Davis took office, he made clear to me that he will not tolerate anything less than the highest professional standards in corrections, and we intend to root out and remove any staff who cannot meet those standards," said C.A. "Cal" Terhune, Director of CDC. "We have a zero-tolerance stance for any kind of inappropriate behavior by staff, including sexual misconduct"

"Sexual misconduct between prison staff and inmates is particularly abhorrent because of the inherent problems of staff having complete authority over inmates," Terhune noted. "We absolutely will not, under any circumstance, permit that kind of behavior between a vulnerable inmate and a staff person."

"Corrections is setting up a hotline for female inmates that will allow them direct access to the CDC Office of Internal Affairs," Terhune added. "We want women in our prisons to know that we take their complaints seriously and will investigate allegations of sexual misconduct by staff."

To date the investigation has led to the resignation of two employees after they were found dating parolees. Another has been placed on administrative leave and is currently pending prosecution by the San Bernardino District Attorney’s Office for sexual assault.

In addition, another staff resigned while awaiting result of an investigation into an allegation that he is the father of an inmate’s child.

Today’s announcement by Corrections officials continues an extensive campaign launched after wardens from several women’s prisons called for investigations of staff misconduct.

To date CDC’s efforts to address the issue of staff sexual misconduct with inmates has included the following:

  • In November 1998 a task force was formed to investigate similar problems at another women’s prison.
  • In March 1999 the Warden at CIW and four other high-ranking CDC officials attended a seminar in Washington, D.C. that focused on how to uncover and identify serious misconduct issues.
  • CDC Director Terhune signed an April 1999 memo to all employees stating the Department’s zero-tolerance for inappropriate behavior. The memo stated that, "There is no such thing as a consensual sexual relationship between staff and inmates under California law." It also reminded CDC staff that, "As an employee of CDC, it is your responsibility to report all allegations, observations or information you receive regarding violations of the law and policies governing this misconduct. Failure to report these crimes will result in disciplinary action."
  • Last month, Director Terhune established a Task Force of wardens assigned to women’s prisons to review policy issues related to managing female offenders. The Task Force is charged with recommending policy changes relative to gender specific assignments, identifying and removing barriers to reporting sexual misconduct, and other issues related to female offenders.
  • This past summer two CDC investigators attended specialized training to investigate sexual assault. The training, certified by the state’s Peace Officers Standards and Training Commission (POST), gives CDC the expertise necessary to investigate an issue that is always considered difficult, even outside prison walls.
  • Since then, CDC has developed a detailed and thorough investigative protocol and launched a training program on investigative procedures, which is expected to receive POST certification in the near future. Training includes medical protocols, reporting forms, applicable laws and related issues critical to sound investigations of sexual assault.
  • The Department is supporting the administration-sponsored SB 377, Polanco that would broaden existing prohibitions against sexual relations between inmates and staff. Such relations are currently punishable as misdemeanors.
CDC’s response to the problem began with a warden’s request for an investigation when an inmate accused a staff person of fathering her child. As investigators began to look into the issue, they uncovered additional instances of illegal and inappropriate conduct between staff and inmates.

"This Department does not intend to conclude this investigation until we are sure that such behavior has been eliminated," Terhune said. "

Inmate Firefighters Join Fire Lines in 6 Counties

Nearly 2,000 inmate firefighters from the California Department of Corrections have joined the battle lines against raging wildfires that threaten communities and open lands in counties from the Oregon border to Central California.

Orange-suited inmates from 28 of the state’s 38 conservation camps from as far south as San Diego have been pulled in to help other fire crews contain the blazes caused by thousands of lighting strikes last Sunday and Monday. The 1,731 inmates and 160 staff from the California Department of Corrections (CDC) will remain on the fire lines until they are fully contained and then will be deployed to help contain other blazes. Currently, there are 114 CDC crews on the fire lines at nine major locations that together encompass approximately 250 separate fires. No inmate fire deaths or serious injuries have been reported to date.

Inmates assigned to minimum level security conservation camps are those typically convicted of non-violent offenses. They must pass a highly selective screening process and a rigorous training regime that includes 64 hours of classroom and hands-on fire fighting training. The average camp inmate is serving a two year sentence and will spend nine months in camp before being paroled.
Nearly 4,000 inmates are housed in the series of camps that are jointly operated by CDC and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CDF). CDC oversees camp security and operations while CDF provides the fire fighting training and supervision of inmate firefighters on duty.

Conservation camp inmates provide over two million hours of firefighting response and prevention services during an average fire season. They are paid $1.00 per hour on the fire lines and from $1.45 to $3.90 a day for non-emergency work. It is estimated that their work saves more than $70 million in costs to state and local governments.

When not fighting fires, inmates provide from six to eight million hours of conservation and project work annually, including such emergency and non-emergency tasks as earthquake response, flood control, wildlife habitat preservation and graffiti removal.

Note: CDC Information Specialist Lt. Mack Reynolds is currently available at the Butte Complex Incident Command Post at the Silver Dollar Fairgrounds in Chico to assist media interested in covering the inmates’ firefighting efforts. He can be reached at (530) 345-3892.

Tuesday, June 29, 1999

KATI CORSAUT APPOINTED ACTING ASSISTANT DIRECTOR COMMUNICATIONS OFFICE

Effective Monday, June 28, 1999, Kati Corsaut will serve as the acting Assistant Director, Communications Office, for the California Department of Corrections. Corsaut replaces Tipton Kindel, who will remain in the Communications Office as an Information Officer II.

Corsaut will remain in the position until a permanent replacement is hired. She retired from the Department in 1998, and had previously served with the California Attorney General’s Office, the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Monday, June 14, 1999

Department of Corrections Honors Its Heroes Medal of Valor Awards Ceremony June 14, 1999


The California Department of Corrections honored 45 of its employees for acts of heroism and outstanding service while on duty and in the community. The employees—men and women, peace officer and civilian—were selected from nearly 100 nominees from facilities throughout the state.

Youth and Adult Correctional Agency Secretary Robert Presley and CDC Director C. A. Terhune presented the heroism medals and awards for Correctional Supervisor and Correctional Officer of the Year at the State Capitol in Sacramento.


Robert Presley, Secretary Youth and Adult Correctional Agency
"We are fortunate not to have had a major incident in this system," Youth and Adult Correctional Agency Secretary Robert Presley said, "and I think we should be proud of it."

"There are two major reasons for this. One is the fine work by our correctional officers who are out there fighting these battles every day, and certainly those being honored today.

"The second is that all of the prisons built since 1980 were designed so that when an uprising did occur, it could be contained.

"I’ve had the opportunity to visit several facilities—both CDC and CYA—while being Secretary, and I’ve always come away heartened by all the good work going on in there."


C. A. Terhune, Director California Department of Corrections

"We often hear it said," CDC Director C. A. Terhune said in his remarks, "that people don’t care about their neighbors or strangers. That people stand by, watch or do nothing as tragic events unfold. Today, we’ll hear about 45 men and women who do care. In every case, they cared enough to risk their life.

"Each of them, while looking fear in the face, demonstrated bravery and service above and beyond the call of duty and community service. These men and women are among the most heroic civil servants in California and, I would suggest, in the United States.

"As employees," Terhune continued, "they carry on our mission of public safety, and perform their duties out of the public’s view.

"Today, they are in the spotlight as recognition that they are exceptional human beings and heroes in every sense."

MEDAL OF VALOR

The Medal of Valor is the Department’s highest award, earned by employees distinguishing themselves by conspicuous bravery or heroism above and beyond the normal demands of correctional service. The employees shall display great courage in the face of immediate life-threatening peril and with full knowledge of the risk involved. The act should show professional judgment and not jeopardize operations or the lives of others.

The Medal of Valor is the Department’s highest award, earned by employees distinguishing themselves by conspicuous bravery or heroism above and beyond the normal demands of correctional service. The employees shall display great courage in the face of immediate life-threatening peril and with full knowledge of the risk involved. The act should show professional judgment and not jeopardize operations or the lives of others.


Correctional Officer Andre K. Johnson from California State Prison, Los Angeles County is awarded the Medal of Valor for risking his own life to save Correctional Officer Rita Hanson who was seriously injured by a group of 50 inmates during a melee last August.

Officer Johnson was attacked and battered by several inmates using their fists as he arrived at Facility 1. Despite sustaining significant injuries, Officer Johnson overcame the assault and rescued Officer Hanson during a very dangerous incident.

We honor his conspicuous bravery and heroism above and beyond the normal demands of correctional service with the Department’s highest honor, the Medal of Valor.


Marvin Yaw, Electrician II from Folsom State Prison is awarded the Medal of Valor for saving outside lineman Christopher Kennedy from certain electrocution as he became entangled in high voltage lines while working outside the prison. When Kennedy yelled, "I can’t let go! Help me! I can’t let go," electrician Yaw climbed aboard a nearby bucket truck and grabbed Kennedy’s leather safety belt, pulling him to safety.

The lineman suffered a minor shock and is alive today thanks to Yaw’s quick thinking and unselfish actions. For his heroism, Marvin Yaw is presented with the Medal of Valor.


Correctional Officers Moises Diaz, Winfred Longwith and Oscar Perez, from Wasco State Prison are awarded the Medal of Valor for putting the lives of others before their own by rescuing two men in imminent danger of death after a collision trapped them in their trucks.

While driving home from work, Officers Diaz and Perez rescued the driver of one truck that was in the path of an oncoming train. Officer Longwith lowered himself into the other overturned truck cab but could not lift out the driver. Knowing he was unable to get the driver out before the train reached them, he climbed out of the cab, stood on the truck and signaled the train. The train missed the truck by fewer than ten feet.

Officers Diaz, Perez and Longwith are being honored with the Medal of Valor for putting the lives of others before their own and responding with great courage and compassion.

GOLD MEDAL

The Corrections Star (Gold) medal is the Department’s second highest award for heroic deeds under extraordinary circumstances. The employee shall display courage in the face of immediate peril in acting to save the life of another person.

Correctional Officer Curtis Leitaker and Correctional Sergeant Gerald Loosemore, California Correctional Center

Correctional Officer Curtis Leitaker and Correctional Sergeant Gerald Loosemore are awarded the Gold Medal for saving the lives of four accident victims. The officers were driving along an icy highway when suddenly a pickup with four occupants lost control, slid off the roadway, and rolled down an embankment. The truck landed upside-down in the icy waters of Long Valley Creek.

When the men reached the truck, they discovered one passenger nearly submerged in the freezing water. Working together quickly without regard for their own safety in the sub-freezing water, Officer Leitaker and Sergeant Loosemore rescued the passengers and brought them to safety.

Their actions represent the finest of the California Department of Corrections. In recognition of their bravery, the Department honors these men with the Gold Medal.

Correctional Officer Matthew Minnick, California Correctional Center

Correctional Officer Matthew Minnick is awarded the Gold Medal for risking his safety to help two vehicle accident victims. Officer Minnick was enroute to Reno when he noticed a sports utility vehicle on its side and a second automobile on the opposite side of the road with an hysterical teenage girl inside. As there were no signs of injury to her or to her car, he hurried to the overturned vehicle.

While another motorist held the door open, Officer Minnick assisted the first victim out and lowered her to the ground. He then turned his attention to the older woman trapped by her seatbelt. Without regard that the car could explode at any time, Officer Minnick managed to pull her to safety.

Officer Minnick’s willingness to assist others in need, and his ability to communicate clearly in a highly stressful situation, makes him deserving of the Department’s Gold Medal.

Correctional Officer Kelly Allen, California Medical Facility

Correctional Officer Kelly Allen is awarded the Gold Medal for her assistance in apprehending four criminals.

While stopped at a motel to spend the night, Officer Allen and her husband noticed four men approach another vehicle with four female occupants. From a distance, Officer Allen saw the men cover their faces and heard them yelling at the occupants of the vehicle. She removed her off-duty weapon from her vehicle, advised her husband to seek cover, and confronted the four men.

One of the men, however, began firing in her direction, as he and the other three men began to flee the scene. Two hit Officer Allen’s car. San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Deputies subsequently captured the men.

Officer Allen receives the Department’s Gold Medal for her bravery.

Correctional Officer William B. Barberick, California State Prison, Corcoran

Correctional Officer William B. is awarded the Gold Medal honoring his heroic and quick-thinking actions in stopping a potentially lethal inmate fight.

Officer Barberick was on duty in a prison yard, when he saw four inmates attacking and stabbing another inmate. Officer Barberick arrived first on the scene and hurled himself toward three of the attackers and knocked them off the attacked inmate.

His act so surprised the other attackers that they stopped and assumed a prone position on the ground.

The incident was over quickly. Because Officer Barberick thought and acted quickly in stopping what could have been a fatal assault, the Department honors him today with its Gold Medal.

Facility Captain Harry McDaniel, North Kern State Prison

Facility Captain Harry McDaniel is honored today with the Gold Medal for rescuing a woman from a travel trailer that was engulfed in flames.

The rescued woman suffered major burns over 30 percent of her body. Captain McDaniel spoke with the fire department as they were enroute to the scene, and, as instructed, he poured water on her burns and comforted her.

When the ambulance arrived and transported the victim to Kern Medical Center, Captain McDaniel continued to provide assistance, going to the hospital and communicating with her parents for follow-up instructions.

Captain McDaniel is an excellent example of a Corrections professional, going above and beyond the call of duty to save the life of another. We salute him today with the Gold Medal for his bravery, compassion and honor.

Parole Agents I Mark Joiner, David Mouras and John Thompson, Parole & Community Services Division, Region II

Parole Agents Mark Joiner, David Mouras and John Thompsom are awarded the Gold Star for their quick action in disarming a hostile parolee who would not surrender.

The parolee with a knife lunged at Agent Mouras, stabbing at him twice. Agent Thompson distracted the parolee while Agent Joiner sprayed the parolee with pepper spray. The parolee lunged at Agent Thompson, who was able to pin the knife between his body and his arm. After a struggle, agents took the knife away from the parolee.

Parole Agents Mark Joiner, David Mouras and John Thompson are honored today with the Gold Medal.

SILVER MEDAL

The Corrections Star (Silver) medal is the Department’s third highest honor for acts of bravery under extraordinary or unusual circumstances. The employee shall display courage in the face of potential peril while saving or attempting to save the life of another person or distinguish her or herself by performing in stressful situations with exceptional tactics or judgment.

Correctional Officer Gregory Maxie, California State Prison, San Quentin
Correctional Officer Gregory Maxie is honored with the Department’s Silver Medal for assisting the California Highway Patrol in capturing a carjacking suspect.

Officer Maxie chased the suspect when he jumped a fence and ran into a residential neighborhood. After scaling the fence, The suspect was yelling that he had a gun and he would use it. The suspect ran down the street and attempted to carjack a vehicle driving down the street. With Officer Maxie’s assistance, a California Highway Patrol officer apprehended the suspect.

The suspect was wanted in Oklahoma for armed carjacking and escaping from a mental institution.

Officer Maxie is saluted today with the Silver Medal for embodying the essential qualities of a California Department of Corrections officer.

Correctional Officers Mark R. Cruz, Armando C. Ramirez and Rodney Temporal, Calipatria State Prison

Correctional Officers Mark R. Cruz, Armando C. Ramirez and Rodney Temporal are awarded the Silver Medal for saving the life of Calipatria Correctional Sergeant Donald Fish. The trio responded to an automobile accident while on their way home.

Sergeant Fish was driving one of the vehicles which overturned and caught fire. Without regard for their own safety, they were able to move the car and pull Sergeant Fish to safety. Shortly afterwards, the vehicle completely was engulfed in flames and destroyed. The extraordinary courage, and quick response by Officers Cruz, Ramirez and Temporal saved the life of their colleague, Sergeant Fish.

We honor them today with the Silver Medal for their outstanding efforts.

Correctional Officers Paul A. Dockendorf, Rick Reinaldo and Jeff S. Rumsey, Correctional Sergeant Dan Woodward, Correctional Lieutenant Tom Ayers, Folsom State Prison

Correctional Officers Paul Dockendorf, Rick Reinaldo, Jeff Rumsey, Correctional Sergeant Dan Woodward and Correctional Lieutenant Tom Ayers are honored today with the Silver Medal for helping police capture an armed and dangerous suspect.

While at a Sacramento-area pizza parlor for refreshments, they saw two Sacramento Police Officers question and search a young man. The man bolted toward the front door and ran past Lieutenant Ayers and Sergeant Woodward who stood just twenty feet away. The police officers shouted at them to "Get Him!" Without regard to their own personal safety. Lieutenant Ayers and Sergeant Woodward grabbed the fleeing suspect. Officers Reinaldo, Rumsey and Dockendorf restraining him until additional police officers arrived. A search recovered a bag filled with money and a handgun. The young bank robber now is serving a 25 year prison sentence.

BRONZE MEDAL

The Corrections Star (Bronze) medal is the Department’s award for saving a life without placing oneself in peril. The employee shall have used proper training and tactics in a professional manner to save, or clearly contribute to saving, the life of another person.

Correctional Officer Ronald W. Hevener, California Correctional Center

Correctional Officer Lorenzo L. Abella, High Desert State Prison

Correctional Officer Ronald W. Hevener, California Correctional Center and Correctional Officer Lorenzo L. Abella from High Desert State Prison are awarded the Bronze Medal for saving the life of Correctional Sergeant Steve Chapman from certain drowning.

The surf separated the three while diving for abalone, and Officer Hevener noticed that Sergeant Chapman was disabled and floating lifeless face down. Though physically exhausted, Officer Hevener managed to pull Sergeant Chapman onto his inner tube.

Officer Abella, who had made it safely to shore, re-entered the dangerous surf and together, he and Officer Hevener, towed Sergeant Chapman to shore.

If it were not for the heroic actions of Officers Hevener and Abella, Sergeant Chapman would have died in the rough seas. The Department honors them today for their actions with the Bronze Medal.

Correctional Counselor I Keith Streeter, California Correctional Center

Correctional Counselor Keith Streeter is awarded the Bronze Medal for his quick action in rescuing two accident victims.

He was driving through a snowstorm to Trinity River Conservation Camp #3, when he saw a vehicle roll over with the occupants inside. Counselor Streeter quickly assessed whether or not there was immediate danger to the two elderly occupants or if the gas tank was leaking. He advised them to stay calm so they would not incur additional injuries to themselves. They were insistent on leaving their vehicle, and Streeter placed a blanket on the ground to protect them from broken glass and assisted them in climbing out.

Correctional Counselor Streeter exemplifies the courage and caring attitude that is part of the California Correctional System. We honor him today with the Department’s Bronze Medal.

Correctional Officer Russell W. Roper, California State Prison, Corcoran

Correctional Officer Russell W. Roper is honored today with the Department’s Bronze Medal for assisting an accident victim.

Officer Roper noticed tractor-trailer driver Denny Cardwell lying on the side of the road. Cardwell’s vehicle had pulled to the roadside slowing traffic. Officer Roper stopped to render assistance and discovered that the man was semi-conscious and in dire need of medical attention. He quickly took control of the situation, keeping order, directing traffic and alerting the Highway Patrol and emergency medical technicians.

While waiting for additional assistance, Officer Roper remained on the scene keeping the man calm and traffic moving smoothly. When the CHP and EMTs arrived, Officer Roper continued traffic control and set up a roadblock for a life flight helicopter to land.

We honor Officer Roper today for his efforts with the Bronze Medal.

Correctional Lieutenant Steven J. Vance, California State Prison, Sacramento

Correctional Lieutenant Steven J. Vance is awarded the Bronze Medal for his quick thinking in preventing serious injury to an inmate.

Lieutenant Vance responded to an inmate-on-inmate assault in a secured housing cell. An inmate attacked his cellmate with a piece of a broken television, who sustained multiple lacerations to his body from the initial attack. The inmate assailant continued to threaten the victim and attempted to injure him further.

As the assailant moved in front of the cell’s food tray slot, Lieutenant Vance grabbed the inmate’s hand and pulled it back through the slot. He was able to retrieve the weapon and allowed other staff to place handcuffs on the assailant.

This act demonstrated Lieutenant Vance’s ability to react quickly in a highly volatile situation. His actions prevented further injury to the inmate victim and likely prevented serious life-threatening injuries. Lieutenant Vance is honored today for his commitment to inmate and staff safety with the Department’s Bronze Medal.

Correctional Officer Susan D. Gore, Calipatria State Prison

Correctional Officer Susan D. Gore is honored with the Bronze Medal for her quick thinking at a vehicle accident.

While traveling from work at Calipatria State Prison, Officer Gore came upon the scene of an accident not far from the prison. One of the vehicles involved was overturned and on fire. Several Calipatria Officers were already on the scene, pulling Correctional Sergeant Donald Fish from his fiery vehicle.

While fellow Correctional Officers responded to the accident, Officer Gore immediately called for emergency assistance with her cellular telephone and began to divert traffic around the accident scene.

Officer Gore’s quick response in notifying emergency personnel made a critical difference in treatment received by Sergeant Fish. In awarding Officer Gore the Bronze Medal, the Department acknowledges her calm, courage and responsiveness.

Correctional Officers Robert Powell and Christine Seidel, Correctional Sergeant A. Jay Seide, Calipatria State Prison

Correctional Officers Robert Powell, Christine Seidel and Correctional Sergeant A. Jay Seidel are awarded the Bronze Medal for their actions which prevented further injuries to three civilians. The trio was traveling together when they came upon an off-road vehicle accident at Glamis, California.

They administered first aid to the three victims, placing the first victim into a head, neck and back brace, onto a gurney, and carried her to the bed of a pickup truck. They rode with her, keeping her stable, to the ambulance and carried her from the truck to the ambulance.

Officers Powell and Seidel and Sergeant Seidel showed selflessness and courage in helping these accident victims. The Department awards them the Bronze Medal for their "commendable professionalism and actions that have not gone unnoticed."

Correctional Officer Steven J. Acosta, Centinela State Prison

Correctional Officer Steven J. Acosta is honored today for rescuing Correctional Lieutenant Bruce Furtado from certain death. Officer Acosta was enroute to work when he saw another vehicle lose control and flip over two to three times.

Officer Acosta immediately pulled off the road and smelled a strong gasoline odor. Officer Acosta moved Lieutenant Furtado to safety and worked to prevent him from going into shock until medical help arrived about 30 minutes later.

While seriously hurt, Lieutenant Furtado survived the accident thanks to Officer Acosta’s courageous actions which we recognize today with the Department’s Bronze Medal.

Correctional Officer Robert Shupe, Chuckawalla Valley State Prison

Correctional Officer Robert Shupe is awarded the Bronze Medal for helping an elderly man lying on the side of the street.

While driving through Monrovia, Officer Shupe observed the man and pulled his vehicle to the side of the road. He learned the man was unconscious and drove to the nearest fire station. When Officer Shupe and the firefighter returned, they realized the victim had no pulse. Officer Shupe told the firefighter that he was CPR-trained and began to administer CPR, while the firefighter contacted a medical emergency unit.

After administering CPR for several minutes, Officer Shupe was able to revive the man and continued his efforts until professional medical staff arrived on the scene.

For his unselfish and courageous efforts in helping to save this man’s life, Officer Shupe is awarded the Department’s Bronze Medal.

Correctional Officer Deanna Gossett, Deuel Vocational Institute

Correctional Officer John Pedroso, Sierra Conservation Center

Correctional Officers Deanna Gossett and John Pedroso are awarded the Bronze Medal for coming to the aid of Correctional Officer Kim Ukert.

Officer Ukert was involved in a serious traffic accident where a farm tractor had pulled out in front of his vehicle. Officers Gossett and Pedroso were among the first to arrive at the scene, and summoned emergency assistance, rendered first aid, and comforted Officer Ukert. When they discovered that his injuries were not critical, they offered assistance to the tractor driver, who was pinned beneath his tractor. Officer Gossett retrieved her car jack and, with Officer Pedroso’s assistance, was able to free the tractor driver.

Correctional Officers Deanna Gossett and John Pedroso exemplify the Department’s highest standards in helping to save lives, and are honored today with its Bronze Medal.

Joey Rudisill, Medical Technical Assistant, Ironwood State Prison

Joey Rudisill, Medical Technical Assistant is honored today with the Bronze Medal for saving two men from immediate peril following a traffic accident. MTA Rudisill witnessed a high-speed crash of two semi-trucks with the drivers trapped in their cabs.

He administered first aid while the driver was pinned in the truck and remained by the driver’s side, freeing enough room for the driver to be removed from the wreckage. MTA Rudisill improvised a dressing for the lacerations the truck driver received on his head and took C-spine precautions and vital sign assessments until the Riverside County paramedics arrived.

We congratulate Medical Technical Assistant Rudisill today for his efforts in assisting others and saving them from immediate peril. In recognition of this accomplishment, he receives the Department’s Bronze Medal.

Parole Agent I Jose Vasquez, Parole & Community Services Division, Region II

Parole Agent I Jose Vasquez is awarded the Bronze Medal for coming to the aid of three other Parole Agents.

Agent Vasquez was in the Oakland Parole office when he heard a commotion during a planned arrest of a parolee. It had taken a turn for the worst when the parolee brandished a knife at Parole Agents Mark Joiner, David Mouras and John Thompson.

He responded immediately by drawing his duty weapon and pointing it at the parolee, shouting commands for the parolee to drop the knife or he would shoot. After several moments of struggling and commands to drop the knife, the parolee finally reacted to pepper spray and attempted to retreat into a corner.

Agent Vasquez is honored today with the Department’s Bronze Medal for his immediate reaction in defending Parole Agents Thompson, Mouras and Joiner against an armed parolee.

Correctional Officer Mark Slocum, Marlene Slocum, Office Assistant, Sierra Conservation Center

Correctional Officer Mark Slocum and Office Assistant Marlene Slocum are recognized today with the Bronze Medal for their life-saving actions. They came upon a single vehicle accident with the victim covered with blood, attempting to climb a barbed wire fence. They assisted him across the highway, laid a sleeping bag down for him and covered him sufficiently to keep him from going into shock.

Office Assistant Slocum used her cellular telephone to call 911, while Officer Slocum used compresses to stop the flow of blood from the victim. When emergency vehicles arrived, the two apprised them of accident details and continued to stay with the victim until he was evacuated by ambulance to an area where he would be airlifted to a local hospital.

Due to their quick thinking and assistance, Officer Mark Slocum and Office Assistant Marlene Slocum undoubtedly saved the life of the accident victim. We recognize them today with the Department’s Bronze Medal for this outstanding public service.

Correctional Officer Kelly Phillips, Wasco State Prison

Correctional Officer Kelly Phillips is honored today with the Bronze Medal for his actions following a high-speed collision. Officer Phillips immediately pulled over to help Correctional Officers Moises Diaz, Oscar Perez and Winfred Longwith who pulled both injured drivers out of the path of an oncoming train. Officer Kelly also administered first aid to one of the injured drivers.

The Department recognizes Officer Phillips for his invaluable assistance in providing first aid to an injured driver, possibly saving his life. He is awarded the Bronze Medal for his life-saving actions.

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL

The Distinguished Service Medal is for an employee’s exemplary work conduct with the Department for a period of months or years, or involvement in a specific assignment of unusual benefit to the Department.
Melissa Gonzalez, Office Assistant, Salinas Valley State Prison

Office Assistant Melissa Gonzalez is awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for her integral part of the prison’s Investigative Services Unit (ISU) and her role in the successful capture of an escapee.

The ISU was monitoring the escapee’s movements and knew he had visited a men’s shelter in Salinas and appeared headed toward Watsonville. Gonzalez contacted all the local area men’s shelters, providing them with details about the escapee. Approximately one hour later, the inmate walked into a shelter and was subsequently arrested.

Office Assistant Gonzalez is also active in the local community. Her nomination read in part, "Melissa Gonzalez has always given 100% and more and has proven to be a great asset to the local community and Salinas Valley State Prison." We salute Office Assistant Melissa Gonzalez today with the Department’s Distinguished Service Medal.

UNIT CITATION

The Unit Citation is for great courage displayed by a departmental unit in the course of conducting an operation in the face of immediate life-threatening circumstances.

C Facility Main Yard, California State Prison, Sacramento

Staff at Facility C at California State Prison, Sacramento County is honored with a Unit Citation for preventing a serious incident to escalate out of control. On Nov. 9, 1998, a racial disturbance erupted between approximately 270 African American and White inmates on the prison’s C Facility Main Yard.

Staff organized, separated the combatants and formed a line of control to keep the larger groups of inmates from creating another disturbance. The united efforts by staff allowed the situation to "cool down." They convinced influential inmates within the various groups to stop their aggression toward staff members.

The unit changed a quickly-escalating violent, life-threatening situation into a consolidated effort by all—staff and inmates alike—to end the incident, concluding with only minor injuries.

We salute the team today with a Unit Citation for their outstanding efforts in quelling this potentially devastating incident.

Accepting on behalf of the prison is Warden Cheryl Pliler and Facility Captain James Walker.

1998 CORRECTIONAL SUPERVISOR OF THE YEAR

Correctional Sergeant John A. McKinney, Pelican Bay State Prison

Correctional Sergeant John A. McKinney is the 1998 Correctional Supervisor of the Year for the California Department of Corrections.

At Pelican Bay, Sergeant McKinney is a Facility B Sergeant whose investigative skills and knowledge of prison gangs enhanced the performance of all third watch staff. He has supervised tactical cell entries for recovering contraband from general population housing units, all of which have been without injury to staff or inmates. He also initiated the K-9 program in Receiving and Release and in the Pelican Bay mailroom, which has helped curtail the amount of narcotics introduced into the institution.

Correctional Sergeant John McKinney has contributed his knowledge and expertise to the Department on several levels. His involvement and dedication to his work are invaluable. Today we honor him as the 1998 California Department of Corrections’ Correctional Supervisor of the Year.

1998 CORRECTIONAL OFFICER OF THE YEAR

Correctional Officer Todd Drew, California Correctional Institution

Correctional Officer Todd Drew is the 1998 Correctional Officer of the Year.
In January 1998, Officer Drew was assigned to the Institutional Gang Investigations Unit and participated in various strategies on how gang members are validated as members or associates. He was instrumental in investigating a stabbing assault of a CCI correctional officer. His investigative skills and professional dedication toward staff safety, and his ability to communicate with inmates played an invaluable role in his investigations. As a result, the gang unit succeeded in charging 13 inmates with direct involvement in staff assault. Officer Drew teaches gang awareness to the public and to criminal justice students at Cal State Bakersfield. His efforts have increased gang awareness in the institution and among the public.

Today we recognize Correctional Officer Todd Drew’s contributions and dedication to the Department as the 1998 California Department of Corrections’ Correctional Officer of the Year.

Friday, June 11, 1999

CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS SETTLES LAWSUIT WITH FORMER CORCORAN CORRECTIONAL OFFICER

The California Department of Corrections (CDC) and former Correctional Officer Richard Caruso set aside their differences and entered into a mutually agreeable settlement of Caruso’s stress and attorneys’ fees claims today, announced CDC Director C. A. "Cal" Terhune. The complaints arose from Caruso’s 1994 cooperation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation regarding allegations of misconduct at the California State Prison, Corcoran.

As part of the settlement, Caruso agreed to dismiss and release from liability all individual defendants, the state and various state employees who were named in state and federal lawsuits he has filed since 1996. In exchange, CDC has agreed to pay Caruso and his attorneys an undisclosed amount. CDC also has agreed to drop all existing disciplinary actions against Caruso and has specifically denied liability.

Terhune commended the more than 45,000 CDC employees for their dedication. "I would like to take this opportunity to express my unflagging support of the dedicated employees of CDC who have repeatedly demonstrated their integrity and professionalism."

Terhune also reiterated CDC’s policy of encouraging staff to report allegations of misconduct without fear of reprisal. "We will take all reasonable measures to ensure that there will be no retaliation for reporting illegal activities or violations of law or public policy," he said.

Corrections Medal of Valor Awards Monday June 14 Noon West Steps State Capitol

Three correctional officers on their way home from work rescue motorists trapped in their vehicles as a train bears down…another officer sustains critical injuries in protecting another from an inmate assault…and a staff electrician pulls a man to safety after a near electrocution. The Department of Corrections (CDC) will recognize these and other employees who distinguished themselves with acts of valor at the 15th annual Medal of Valor Ceremony, Monday, June 14 at noon on the West steps of the State Capitol.

CDC will honor 45 of its employees for heroism and outstanding service while on duty and in the community. The men and women were selected from more than 100 nominees from facilities throughout the state.

Youth and Adult Correctional Agency Secretary Robert Presley and CDC Director C. A. Terhune will present the heroism medals and an award for Correctional Supervisor and Correctional Officer of the Year.

During the ceremony, Sacramento news anchors Lisa Breckenridge, KCRA-TV; Christina Mendonsa, KXTV-TV; and Jennifer Whitney, KOVR-TV will highlight details of the acts that earned the medals.

A summary of the individual actions and awards will be available on Monday, June 14 on the CDC Internet site here.

Friday, April 30, 1999

MEDIA ACCESS FOR EXECUTION

The California Department of Corrections has completed processing security clearances for media firms requesting to send representatives to San Quentin State Prison for the February 9, 1999, scheduled execution of Jaturun Siripongs.

Firms have been contacted by telephone with the information on clearances for their staff members.

The following information should be distributed to all media representatives who will be involved as witnesses or participants in the news conference at San Quentin State Prison.

On February 8, 1999, media may enter the west gate of San Quentin between 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. For security purposes, two forms of identification will be required. One must be an official photo ID such as driver’s license, passport, or state-issued identification card. Only those credentialed for the news conference will be permitted.

Media witnesses to the execution may enter as late as 9:30 p.m. through the west gate of the prison.

Do not wear blue, black, or gray denim clothing or yellow raincoats. It is illegal to bring alcohol, drugs, or weapons into a California State Prison. Vehicles and individuals entering a California State Prison are subject to search.

Private vehicles, except for designated microwave or satellite broadcast trucks, will be parked near the west gate. After credentials are confirmed, reporters will be transported by prison shuttle to the Media Center.

There will be an audio/video pool feed of the media witness news conference. Media movement will be restricted to the Media Center [In-Service Training (IST) Building] and broadcast support area. No access will be permitted to the east gate.

Thursday, April 8, 1999

MEDIA ACCESS FOR SCHEDULED EXECUTION

The execution of Manuel Pina Babbitt , convicted of first degree murder with special circumstances, is set by court order for May 4, 1999, at San Quentin State Prison.

Access Inquiries:

Direct all requests and inquiries regarding access to San Quentin State Prison to the California Department of Corrections Communications Office in Sacramento, which is responsible for all media credentials. Requests are due by 5 p.m., Friday, January 18, 2002. (See "Credentials")

Reporters:

Up to 125 news media representatives may be admitted to the media center Building at San Quentin to attend news briefings and a news conference after the execution. To accommodate as many media firms as possible, each news media organization applying will be limited to one (1) representative. Firms selected to send a news reporter to witness the execution will be allowed a separate representative to the media center.

Audio/Visual/Still Photographs:

In anticipation that interest may exceed space, pool arrangements may be necessary for audio/video feeds and still photographs from inside the media center. The pool will be limited to two (2) television camera operators, two (2) still photographers, and one (1) audio engineer. The Northern California Radio Television News Directors’ Association and the Radio Television News Association in Southern California arrange the pool.

Live Broadcasts:


On-grounds parking is limited. Television and radio stations are limited to one (1) satellite or microwave vehicle.

Television Technicians:

Television technicians or microwave broadcast vehicles will be permitted three (3) support personnel (engineer, camera operator, and producer).

Radio Technicians:


Radio broadcast vehicles will be allowed two (2) support personnel (engineer and producer).

Credentials:

For media credentials, send a written request signed by the news department manager on company letterhead with the name(s) of the proposed representatives, their dates of birth, driver’s license number and expiration dates, social security numbers, and size of vehicle for live broadcast purposes to:

CDC Communications
1515 S Street, Room 113S
P.O. Box 942883
Sacramento, California 94283-0001

All written requests must be received no later than 5 p.m., Friday, January 18, 2002. Media witnesses will be selected from the requests received by that time. Telephone requests will NOT be accepted.

Security clearances are required for each individual applying for access to San Quentin. The clearance process will begin after the application deadline. No assurances can be provided that security clearances for the requests, including personnel substitutions, received after the filing period closes January 18, will be completed in time to permit access to the prison January 28, 2002.

Facilities:

The media center has 60-amp electrical service with a limited number of outlets. There are seven pay telephones. Media orders for private telephone hookups must be arranged with Pacific Bell. Pacific Bell will coordinate the actual installation with San Quentin. There is one soft drink vending machine at the media center. Media personnel should bring their own food. Only broadcast microwave and satellite vans and their support personnel providing "live feeds" will be permitted in a parking lot adjacent to the In-Service Training (IST) building.

Thursday, February 4, 1999

MEDIA ACCESS FOR EXECUTION

The California Department of Corrections has completed processing security clearances for media firms requesting to send representatives to San Quentin State Prison for the February 9, 1999, scheduled execution of Jaturun Siripongs.

Firms have been contacted by telephone with the information on clearances for their staff members.

The following information should be distributed to all media representatives who will be involved as witnesses or participants in the news conference at San Quentin State Prison.

On February 8, 1999, media may enter the west gate of San Quentin between 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. For security purposes, two forms of identification will be required. One must be an official photo ID such as driver’s license, passport, or state-issued identification card. Only those credentialed for the news conference will be permitted.

Media witnesses to the execution may enter as late as 9:30 p.m. through the west gate of the prison.

Do not wear blue, black, or gray denim clothing or yellow raincoats. It is illegal to bring alcohol, drugs, or weapons into a California State Prison. Vehicles and individuals entering a California State Prison are subject to search.

Private vehicles, except for designated microwave or satellite broadcast trucks, will be parked near the west gate. After credentials are confirmed, reporters will be transported by prison shuttle to the Media Center.

There will be an audio/video pool feed of the media witness news conference. Media movement will be restricted to the Media Center [In-Service Training (IST) Building] and broadcast support area. No access will be permitted to the east gate.

Wednesday, January 13, 1999

MEDIA ACCESS FOR SCHEDULED EXECUTION

The execution of Jaturun Siripongs, convicted of two counts of first degree murder with special circumstances, is set by court order for February 9, 1999, at San Quentin State Prison.

Access Inquiries:

Direct all requests and inquiries regarding access to San Quentin State Prison to the California Department of Corrections Communications Office in Sacramento, which is responsible for all media credentials. Requests are due by 5 p.m., Friday, January 18, 2002. (See "Credentials")

Reporters:

Up to 125 news media representatives may be admitted to the media center Building at San Quentin to attend news briefings and a news conference after the execution. To accommodate as many media firms as possible, each news media organization applying will be limited to one (1) representative. Firms selected to send a news reporter to witness the execution will be allowed a separate representative to the media center.

Audio/Visual/Still Photographs:

In anticipation that interest may exceed space, pool arrangements may be necessary for audio/video feeds and still photographs from inside the media center. The pool will be limited to two (2) television camera operators, two (2) still photographers, and one (1) audio engineer. The Northern California Radio Television News Directors’ Association and the Radio Television News Association in Southern California arrange the pool.

Live Broadcasts:

On-grounds parking is limited. Television and radio stations are limited to one (1) satellite or microwave vehicle.

Television Technicians:

Television technicians or microwave broadcast vehicles will be permitted three (3) support personnel (engineer, camera operator, and producer).

Radio Technicians:

Radio broadcast vehicles will be allowed two (2) support personnel (engineer and producer).

Credentials:

For media credentials, send a written request signed by the news department manager on company letterhead with the name(s) of the proposed representatives, their dates of birth, driver’s license number and expiration dates, social security numbers, and size of vehicle for live broadcast purposes to:

CDC Communications
1515 S Street, Room 113S
P.O. Box 942883
Sacramento, California 94283-0001

All written requests must be received no later than 5 p.m., Friday, January 18, 2002. Media witnesses will be selected from the requests received by that time. Telephone requests will NOT be accepted.

Security clearances are required for each individual applying for access to San Quentin. The clearance process will begin after the application deadline. No assurances can be provided that security clearances for the requests, including personnel substitutions, received after the filing period closes January 18, will be completed in time to permit access to the prison January 28, 2002.

Facilities:

The media center has 60-amp electrical service with a limited number of outlets. There are seven pay telephones. Media orders for private telephone hookups must be arranged with Pacific Bell. Pacific Bell will coordinate the actual installation with San Quentin. There is one soft drink vending machine at the media center. Media personnel should bring their own food. Only broadcast microwave and satellite vans and their support personnel providing "live feeds" will be permitted in a parking lot adjacent to the In-Service Training (IST) building.

Friday, January 1, 1999

Media Policies - Adult Institutions

California correctional facilities and programs are operated at public expense for the protection of society. The public has a right and a duty to know how such facilities and programs are being operated. It is the policy of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) to make known to the public through the news media all relevant information pertaining to operations of the department and facilities.

Following is a summary of California regulations and department policies and procedures regarding media access and activities. The complete regulations are found in the California Code of Regulations Title 15, Sections 3260 through 3267, found at this link: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Regulations/Adult_Operations/docs/Title152006Final.pdf

Authorized Release of Information

The following data that may be released about an inmate or parolee includes:

  • Name
  • Age
  • Birthplace
  • Place of previous residence
  • Commitment information
  • Facility assignments and behavior
  • General state of health
  • Cause of death
  • Nature of injury or critical illness (unless the condition is related to the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome)
  • Sentencing and release actions.
CDCR employee data that may be released includes:

  • Name
  • Civil service classification
  • Age
  • Work assignment
  • Length of service with the department and/or current division or unit
  • Past work assignments
  • Role or function in a newsworthy event
Media Access to Facilities

Access to adult CDCR facilities or contract facilities - prisons, community correctional facilities, re-entry facilities, prisoner mother facilities, and camps - and other CDCR offices including parole offices, requires prior approval of the institution head and the press secretary of the CDCR Office of Public and Employee Communications.

Within a facility, media representatives shall be under the direct supervision of the public information officer or his/her designee.

Media representatives cannot enter security housing units (SHU), condemned units (death row), the execution chamber, Administrative Segregation Units (AdSeg or ASU) or any area currently affected by an emergency without approval of the CDCR Secretary, the Director of the Division of Adult Institutions, or designee.

There may be limited access to other areas. These may include control booths, guard towers, protective housing units, reception centers, and units housing mentally, seriously or terminally ill inmates.

Media representatives need to supply a full name, date of birth, social security number and driver's license number to process a security clearance for access to an institution. Media representatives from outside the United States need to supply a full name, date of birth and passport information. If it is a breaking story, media representatives may be allowed access to an area outside the secure perimeter of the facility.

Requests to attend life prisoner parole hearings are handled by the Board of Parole Hearings at (916) 323-2993.

Writing, Telephoning and Visiting an Inmate

Media representatives may contact any state prison inmate by mail. It is not necessary for media to notify CDCR before communicating with an inmate. Incoming letters are opened, inspected for contraband, subject to be read, and then forwarded to the inmate. To ensure prompt processing, mail the letter to the inmate using his/her full name and CDC number in care of the institution where he/she is incarcerated. To get an inmate's CDC number, call the Inmate Check Line at (916) 557-5933. You must have the correct date of birth to obtain the CDC number.

Most inmates have access to telephones and can make outgoing collect calls on designated telephones according to their privilege group. Limitations are placed on the frequency of such calls to allow equal access to telephones by all inmates. When corresponding with an inmate, media representatives may provide a telephone number where an inmate can call them collect. It is up to the inmate to initiate the call. No restriction is placed on the identity or relationship to the inmate of the person called providing the person agrees to accept all charges for the call. Telephone calls are limited to 15 minutes and may be recorded. Media representatives may also record the call with the inmate's permission. Messages will not be taken by staff to inmates.

All inmates are allowed visits with approved visitors. If a media representative wishes to visit an inmate, write to the inmate and ask him/her to send you a CDC Form 106, Visiting Questionnaire. Your completed questionnaire must be submitted and approved by the institution before your visit. The application process takes about 30 working days. All approved visitors - friend, relative, attorney, or member of the media - may visit; however, they may not bring in cameras or recording devices. The institution will provide, upon request, pencil and paper to an adult visitor as needed. For more information about visiting, call the toll-free CDCR Visiting Information number at 1-800-374-8474 or go to this link: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Visitors/index.html

Media Interviews

Media representatives can interview inmates or parolees randomly and random or specific-person face-to-face interviews with staff. Such interviews may be restricted by time, place, duration, and the number of people in a media crew.

Random interviews of inmates involved in a specific activity or program, or encountered while covering a facility activity or event, shall be limited to the time, areas and segments of the facility population designated by the institution head.

Inmates may not participate in specific-person, face-to-face interviews. No inmate, parolee or staff shall be interviewed against their will.

Use of cameras or recording devices inside an institution or on state property requires prior approval.

A CDC Form 146, Inmate Declaration To News Media Contact, shall be completed whenever an inmate is the subject of a still, motion picture or other recording intended for use by a television or radio station, or newspaper, magazine or other publication.

Media interviews shall not be permitted with an inmate suffering from a mental illness when, in the opinion of a psychiatrist or psychologist, the inmate is not capable of giving informed consent.

Controlled access may be permitted to seriously or terminally ill patients and their housing areas.

Media representatives or their organization may be required to pay the security or escort costs provided for interviews.

Cameras and Other Audio or Visual Recording Devices

Possession of any camera, wireless microphone or other recording device within a CDCR facility is prohibited unless specifically authorized by the institution head. A location agreement and a film permit from the California Film Commission may be required for filming on state property.

An inmate's consent is not required in settings like an exercise yard or dining hall where individuals are not singled out or where an inmate's identity is not revealed. Before such shots are taken however, inmates shall be advised so those who do not want to be recognized may turn away or leave the area.

Unless there is a specified threat of imminent danger to an inmate or parolee by releasing their photograph, media representatives shall be permitted access to identification photographs (mug shots) without the inmate's or parolee's consent.

Staff cannot prohibit a person who is not on state property from photographing, filming, video taping or otherwise recording any department facilities, employees, inmates, parolees or equipment.

Non-News Access to CDC Facilities

All non-news motion picture, radio, or television programs produced at any CDCR facility must have prior approval. For definition purposes, non-news related productions include features, documentaries, news magazine programs, commercials, and pilots for proposed news, public information, religious and entertainment television programs.

The process for approval consideration begins with a written request to the CDCR Press Office. The request should include:

  • Details of the project and production location needs
  • Production schedule and duration
  • Crew size
  • Any access to inmates
  • Script sections that pertain to CDCR
  • Scenes to be filmed inside a CDCR facility
  • Type/quantity of production equipment on premises
  • Any satellite or microwave transmission from a CDCR facility
If project approval is given, a location agreement must be executed with the parent firm and a California Film Commission permit (http://www.film.ca.gov/state/film/film_homepage.jsp) will be required along with evidence of financial responsibility and liability insurance in the amount of at least $1 million with the State of California, its offices, employees, and agents as the "additional insureds." Part of the agreement provides for defending and indemnifying the State against any lawsuits. Another part of the agreement also states that the parent firm is responsible for reasonable staffing costs, including benefits and overtime rates of pay, directly associated with its filming activities.

Editorial researchers, freelance writers, authors of books, independent filmmakers, and other unaccredited media must provide proof of employment by an accredited publication/production company, or have evidence that an accredited publication/production company has contracted to purchase the completed project.

Inmates may not participate in specific-person, face-to-face interviews. Random face-to-face interviews may be permitted with inmates as stipulated by the location agreement.

Please allow a minimum of 20 working days for the least complicated request. There are no assurances that access will be granted; however, CDCR does try to accommodate requests within available resources consistent with the safe and secure operations of its institutions and California law.

CDCR Press Office (916) 445-4950

The Press Office, located at CDCR headquarters in Sacramento, articulates the Department's position on issues, manages crisis communications, solicits media coverage of departmental activities, serves as a liaison to the media, and releases information to the public. The Press Office responds to media requests made under the California Public Records Act.

The Press Office also provides other services to media:

Inmate Check Line

Media representatives needing information about a convicted felon sent to state prison in California can call the Press Office's Inmate Check Line. To request whether an individual has been sent to state prison, call (916) 557-5933. Please provide the full name and either the date of birth or the CDC number. Sentencing and/or release information will be faxed within 24 hours.

Stock Video Footage and Still Photographs

The Office of Public and Employee Communications maintains a library of stock video footage and still photographs and makes these available to the media upon request. There is current and archived footage and photographs of correctional facilities and programs, including restricted or limited access areas such as control booths, guard towers, the execution chamber, death row, and Administrative Segregation and Security Housing Units.

Media Inquiries

The Press Office researches and responds to inquiries from the media. Facts are gathered as quickly as possible and provided to the inquirer. If the requested facts are not known or are otherwise unavailable, the inquirer shall be informed and the reasons therefore.

Frequently asked questions about CDCR can be found on the CDCR Website

Press advisories and releases are posted on the CDCR website at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/News/2007_Press_Releases/index.html

Statistics and information about capital punishment are found at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Reports_Research/capital.html

The weekly population reports for adult prisoners and adult parolees are found at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Reports_Research/Offender_Information_Services_Branch/Population_Reports.asp

There are other reports about adult inmates and parolees, including characteristics, recidivism rates, behavior, time served and historical trends. There are also reports about DNA sampling and inmates serving three-strikes sentences. These reports can be found on the Offender Information Reports page.

Media Access to Scheduled Executions

CDCR's Press Office processes all media requests for access to San Quentin State Prison to cover scheduled executions. The Press Office also coordinates media requests to witness executions.

Escapes

In the event of an actual or suspected escape, the public information officer or designee shall notify radio and television stations and newspapers in the surrounding communities and the missing inmate's home community. The prison will provide the missing inmate's physical description, estimated time of disappearance, an identification photograph, the facility's search efforts and cooperation with law enforcement agencies.