Tuesday, October 30, 2007

CDCR Parole Agents Enforcing Special Limits on Sex Offenders for Halloween

No “Trick or Treat” For Sex Offender Parolees
SACRAMENTO – Parole agents from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) will be enforcing special limits on sex offenders to ensure that they stay home and away from children on Halloween night.

“Our agents will be out in force, checking on sex offenders, to ensure that they stay behind locked doors, in dark houses, with absolutely no contact with ‘trick or treaters’ on Halloween night,” said Tom Hoffman, CDCR Director of Parole. “Our goal is to make sure that children have a carefree night free of any potential contact with sex offenders.”

CDCR imposes its most stringent parole conditions on sex offenders, including mandatory curfews and treatment, and limitations on their behavior and where they live to prevent contact with potential victims. Even so, sex offenders are held to even stricter limits on their behavior on Halloween night, when children are on the streets and going door-to-door, sometimes through unfamiliar neighborhoods.

Among the Special Conditions of Parole imposed on sex offenders for Halloween night:

• A 5pm to 5 am curfew during which parolees must remain indoors;
• All exterior lights of their homes must be turned off so that it looks as if no one is home, which takes away any opportunity for children to be tempted to ring the door bell;
• No offering of Halloween candy and no Halloween decorations are allowed;
• During the curfew, sex offender parolees can only open the door to respond to law enforcement, such as parole agents who are patrolling their caseload to ensure compliance.

All CDCR parole agents will be enforcing these conditions on their caseloads individually. In some regions, such as Sacramento and Fresno, CDCR agents will conduct what has become an October tradition. During “Operation Boo,” agents and police will work together to knock on the doors of sex offenders who are on parole or probation to ensure they comply with all the special restrictions.


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Monday, October 29, 2007

CDCR Secretary James Tilton Addresses 15th Annual International Community Corrections Association Conference

Discusses Governor Schwarzenegger’s Comprehensive Prison Reforms and Efforts Underway in
California

SAN DIEGO – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) Secretary James Tilton addressed more than 500 attendees today at the 15th Annual Community Corrections Association (ICCA) conference in San Diego. Attending are representatives of 34 states, Canada, Scotland, Nigeria and China. No fewer than 19 California-based and other criminal justice partners worked with the ICCA to plan and organize this major exposition of research-based solutions to chronic issues in the criminal justice system.

“It takes a strong network of community partnerships to achieve success in the criminal justice field, and strong leadership to enact change” said Secretary Tilton in his opening remarks. “Under Governor Schwarzenegger, California is undertaking a seismic shift in our corrections system that will fundamentally re-focus how our state deals with offenders. The Governor’s reforms emphasize rehabilitation as a way to reduce recidivism and increase public safety. I anticipate that California will continue to be a national and international leader in criminal justice policy as the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation implements these reforms.”

Secretary Tilton gave an overview of Governor Schwarzenegger’s comprehensive prison reforms, AB 900, the Public Safety and Offender Rehabilitation Services Act of 2007, signed in May 2007. He discussed the move toward evidence-based rehabilitation programs in prison. He also talked about the shift from remotely located prisons to Secure Community Reentry Facilities during the final months of inmates’ sentences, and the need for collaboration with local communities and service providers, among other issues.

The conference, titled “Collaborating for Community Justice: A Local Public Safety Imperative,” brought together researchers, city and county government representatives, the judiciary, community corrections professionals, the state sheriff’s association, and others to explore approaches to reducing recidivism through successful reentry programs. The San Diego Sheriff’s Department is the local sponsor, and the CDCR is among the many law enforcement and other community partners in presenting this conference.

Law enforcement and other related professionals from across the United States and Canada will conduct workshops throughout the week highlighting current programs that incorporate research-based practices into their daily operations. California panels will examine the implementation of a number of new legislative directives, including AB 900 and SB 618, the reentry program that has a pilot underway in San Diego County.

Other featured presentations will highlight new research studies from Ireland, Canada, and the United States. Those include an anthropological view of restorative justice practices, the cost-effectiveness of applying best practices in reducing recidivism, and classifying female offenders, the most rapidly growing segment of the prison population.

For more information on the Governor's focus on rehabilitation through the new reforms, please visit the CDCR website at: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/News/PrisonReform.html

Thursday, October 25, 2007

Condemned Inmate Billy Ray Hamilton Dies of Natural Causes

Inmate Billy Ray Hamilton, 58, sentenced to death in 1981 for three counts of first-degree murder with special circumstances, died of natural causes at 3:18 p.m. on Monday, October 22, 2007 at a Kern County hospital.

He and crime partner Connie Sue Barbo murdered Douglas Scott White, Bryon William Schletewitz, and Josephine Linda Rocha on September 4, 1980 at Fran’s Market in Fresno. Hamilton shot the three at close range with a shotgun. Hamilton also attempted to kill two others, one a store employee, and the other a nearby resident who had heard the gunshots and responded.

In October 1980, Hamilton was arrested as a suspect in a Modesto robbery and assault with a deadly weapon. Investigators then learned Hamilton had committed the murders at Fran’s Market on behalf of Clarence Ray Allen.

The two had been incarcerated at Folsom State Prison. Hamilton was serving a four-year sentence for robbery. Allen had been arrested, convicted of burglary, first-degree murder and conspiracy, and sent to prison with a life sentence in 1978 for the 1974 burglary of Fran’s Market and for planning to kill an accomplice. While in prison, Allen plotted to kill the people who had informed on him and gotten him prison time. Three days after Hamilton was paroled, he was picked up by Allen’s son at the bus station and obtained weapons to carry out the crimes.

The investigation led to the arrest of inmate Allen. He was convicted in Glenn County of three counts of first-degree murder with special circumstances and was received onto California’s death row at San Quentin State Prison on December 2, 1982. He was executed by lethal injection on January 17, 2006.

On October 16, 1981, Hamilton was sentenced to death in Contra Costa County and was received onto California’s death row at San Quentin on October 19, 1981.

Barbo was received on February 26, 1982 from Monterey County after she was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole for three counts of first-degree murder and assault with a deadly weapon. She is currently incarcerated at California Institution for Women.

Since 1978 when capital punishment was reinstated in California, 72 condemned inmates have died. Thirteen were executed in California, one was executed in Missouri, 39 died of natural causes, 14 committed suicide, and five died of other causes.

Tuesday, October 23, 2007

Gov. Schwarzenegger Mobilizes CDCR Strike Teams to Southern California Wildfires

CDCR Fire Captains, Engines and Equipment Readied for Deployment to Assist in Statewide Emergency Efforts

Responding to Governor Schwarzenegger's direction for state agencies to assist the firefighting efforts in southern California, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) is mobilizing fire department emergency strike teams from prisons throughout the state. The strike teams' deployments are being coordinated through the Governor's Office of Emergency Services.

"Consistent with state and federal emergency declarations, I am directing staff and fire departments at all of the state's prisons to mobilize and direct available firefighting resources to southern California immediately," said Governor Schwarzenegger.

The first CDCR strike team made up of six fire engines and 18 fire captains from the California Correctional Institution, California Men's Colony, California Rehabilitation Center, Centinela State Prison, Chuckawalla Valley State Prison, Correctional Training Facility and Salinas Valley State Prison was deployed yesterday to assist in fire suppression activities. Additionally, personnel and one fire engine from Mule Creek State Prison joined a strike team deployed from Amador County to southern California and a fire captain from Calipatria State Prison is assisting the City of Calipatria Fire Department.

CDCR is also currently mobilizing another strike team from several Central Valley prisons to be ready for deployment. Engines, equipment and personnel are being assembled from Avenal State Prison, Folsom State Prison, California State Prison-Solano, Kern Valley State Prison, North Kern State Prison, Pleasant Valley State Prison and Wasco State Prison as part of this second wave.

In addition to the strike teams, the department has more than 2,640 trained inmate firefighters supervised by more than 170 custody staff from the Conservation Camp Program actively fighting the southern California wildfires today after being deployed by Governor Schwarzenegger.

Friday, October 19, 2007

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Graduates Another Large Class of Correctional Officers

Work is important to prison reforms underway statewide

Galt – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today graduated the largest class this year of correctional officers at the R.A. McGee Correctional Training Academy in Galt. The correctional officer training is part of Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger’s commitment to increase public safety in the state’s prison system.

CDCR Secretary James Tilton expressed his appreciation and congratulations to the cadets, “I applaud these newest correctional officers, who are committed professionals and dedicated to this honorable profession. We salute you as you begin this next phase of your career, by committing yourself to the public safety and service of California communities.”

The 408 graduates of the program have already been assigned to specific adult correctional institutions where they will begin their careers as correctional officers. Cadets receive 640 hours of instruction during the 16 week academy, including classes in leadership and ethics, crime scene investigation, inmate supervision, emergency operations, first aid, and physical fitness training. Upon graduation from the academy, new correctional officers earn more than $45,000 per year. Top level correctional officers can earn more than $73,000 per year.

The Department is making progress toward meeting its goal to select and hire correctional officers to fill every established position vacancy, including new court required positions. CDCR has intensified its recruitment efforts to increase the number of correctional officers who are needed throughout the state. CDCR receives approximately 7,500 correctional officer applications per month. Typically, only four percent of the potential candidates pass the selection process, which includes psychological, academic, background investigation, medical and physical fitness evaluations.

During the last calendar year, approximately 2,595 cadets have graduated from the academy. CDCR currently has approximately 23,260 correctional officers. For more information visit: http://www.joincdcr.com/

Friday, October 12, 2007

CDCR Hosts Regional Workshop in Downtown Santa Barbara for Ventura, Santa Barbara Counties on Secure Community Reentry Facilities

Event held to educate local officials and stakeholders on new reforms
Santa Barbara - The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) hosted the tenth and final in a series of regional workshops today on Secure Community Reentry Facilities, a key component of recently signed legislation by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to reform California’s prison and jail systems. The workshop, held in downtown Santa Barbara, included representatives from Ventura and Santa Barbara counties.

“The Governor’s comprehensive corrections reforms aim to address severe inmate overcrowding at state prisons and local jails by funding new beds tied to rehabilitation, and creating secure reentry facilities in the local communities where inmates will be returning,” said Marisela Montes, CDCR Chief Deputy Secretary, Adult Programs. “Inmates too often leave prison with $200 minus the cost of a bus ticket, and no prospects for success once they return home. The goal of a secure community reentry facility is to ease the transition of local residents and improve public safety.”

“By law, inmates are returned to their county of last legal residence. In practice, offenders come back to local cities and towns whether they’re rehabilitated or not. It is in the public’s interest to give these returning residents the tools to be law-abiding citizens,” said Sheriff Bob Brooks, Ventura County. “This county has a vital interest in partnering with the state to improve our process for transitioning our residents back home, and exploring the use of secure community reentry facilities.”

”The number-one concern of the public is neighborhood safety,” said Ventura County Supervisor Kathy Long. “The public expects their elected leaders to provide safe communities. The transition services for parolees to return them to the community must provide job training, counseling and other services so that certain inmates can successfully re-enter and integrate into society as productive and contributing individuals. Such services not only enhance public safety and improve our communities, but also save taxpayers' dollars in the long term."

In May of this year, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed Assembly Bill 900, the Public Safety and Offender Rehabilitation Services Act of 2007, a historic prison reform agreement. Chief among the provisions of Assembly Bill 900 are funding for 16,000 beds in secure community reentry facilities.

Secure community reentry facilities will enable CDCR and local communities to create an unprecedented continuity of care to provide support services. Reentry facilities will be built in cities, counties or regions willing to partner with CDCR, to assist local residents who are required to be returned to the county where they committed their offense upon release.

These facilities will provide programs and services such as: Intensive substance abuse treatment; Vocational training and job placement; Education and GED coursework; Anger management classes; Family counseling; Housing placement; and,Targeted services to help ease the transition from incarceration to a crime-free life on the outside.

This regional workshop was the final in a series of 10 statewide regional workshops that have been organized since July 30. In addition, on July 16 CDCR hosted an online web seminar to discuss why community reentry facilities are important to public safety.

Invited participants to the regional workshops were local government officials, sheriffs, boards of supervisors, mayors, city council members, chief probation officers, mental health professionals, drug/alcohol professionals, county administrative officers, police chiefs, district attorneys, county public works, community-based agencies, victims’ advocates, chamber of commerce, legislators, and association representatives.

Participants attended workshops discussing parolee programming needs, jail construction funding, and standards for reentry facilities.

For more information on secure reentry centers, and the Governor's focus on rehabilitation through the new reforms, please visit the CDCR website at: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/News/PrisonReform.html

Thursday, October 11, 2007

Parole Agents Begin Active Enforcement of 2,000 Foot Jessica’s Law Residency Restrictions for Sex Offenders

CDCR Agents to Begin Violating Sex Offender Parolees in Non-Compliant Housing as 45-Day Extension Ends

SACRAMENTO – Starting today, sex offender parolees found living within 2,000 feet of schools and parks who are subject to Jessica’s Law residency restrictions will begin to be arrested for potential revocation to state prison. Sex offender parolees released from prison on or after November 8, 2006, have been prohibited from living within 2,000 feet of schools or parks since the day the law was passed via initiative.

Parolee sex offenders subject to Jessica’s Law were delivered in-person notifications of the 2,000 foot residency restrictions by agents of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s (CDCR) Division of Adult Parole Operations beginning on August 17, 2007. Agents measured the distance from parolees’ residences to schools and parks by GPS device, and those found to be in violation of Jessica’s Law were given 45-days to find appropriate housing. Legal challenges filed after the notifications were made extended the time to comply for some parolees.

Starting today, parole agents began meeting with sex offender parolees who have exhausted the extra time afforded to them to comply with the law, and will arrest those who are in violation. These parolees will be referred to the Board of Parole Hearings for possible revocation to state prison.

“Jessica’s Law clearly states that sex offenders who are released from prison are not to live within 2,000 feet of schools and parks, among other restrictions. Following the passage of this new law, the state has been working aggressively to enforce these residency restrictions, and to utilize new technology such as GPS to monitor sex offenders more effectively,” said CDCR Secretary James Tilton. “California’s parole division is working closely with law enforcement at the local level to implement Jessica’s Law, and to better monitor sex offenders released from prison.”

Since August 17, 2007, all sex offenders released from prison who are subject to Jessica’s Law have been notified of their residency restrictions as terms and conditions of their parole. Beginning October 12 parolees will no longer be given 45-days to comply with Jessica’s Law. They will be expected to be housed in compliance with Jessica’s Law immediately upon release, and parole agents will verify during home contacts within six days of release that their proposed residence is not within 2,000 feet of a school or park using GPS.

Of the nearly 3,000 sex offender parolees released between November 8, 2006, and August 16, 2007 who are subject to Jessica’s Law and are currently under residential supervision, agents from CDCR’s parole division found that approximately:

  • 2,100 were in compliant housing; and,
  • 850 were non-compliant.
“Parole agents will be sweeping the state in the coming weeks to ensure that sex offenders who were notified to move are in compliance with Jessica’s Law once their time is up,” said Tom Hoffman, Director of the Division of Adult Parole Operations. “From here on out, every sex offender released from prison will be officially notified of their residency restrictions as a term of parole. The responsibility is on the sex offender to follow Jessica’s Law, and the state will be working closely and aggressively with local communities to see that this law is enforced.”

Friday, October 5, 2007

CDCR Hosts Regional Workshop in Los Angeles County on Secure Community Reentry Facilities

Event held to educate local officials and stakeholders on new reforms

Los Angeles - The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) hosted the ninth in a series of ten regional workshops today on Secure Community Reentry Facilities, a key component of recently signed legislation by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger to reform California’s prison and jail systems. The workshop, held in downtown Los Angeles, included representatives from the cities of Los Angeles, Santa Fe Springs, Burbank, Glendale, Pasadena, Compton, Whittier, Artesia, and Apple Valley to name some of the attendees.

“The Governor’s comprehensive corrections reforms aim to address severe inmate overcrowding at state prisons and local jails by funding new beds tied to rehabilitation, and creating secure reentry facilities in the local communities where inmates will be returning,” said James E. Tilton, CDCR Secretary. “Inmates too often leave prison with $200 minus the cost of a bus ticket, and no prospects for success once they return home. The goal of a secure community reentry facility is to ease the transition of local residents and improve public safety.”

“The State has made great strides at expanding partnerships and leading the charge to reduce recidivism. These reentry facilities will begin to address the missing pieces that have fostered the revolving door of recidivism. These reentry facilities must be designed according to the needs of the offenders as well as the needs of the community,” said Sheriff Lee Baca.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (LASD) has been a strong supporter of reentry and rehabilitation programs as evidenced in the creation of the Sheriff’s Department Correctional Services Division, which addresses these issues. The innovative efforts of the Sheriff’s Department have been used as a model in reentry and rehabilitation throughout the nation.

“Last year the CDCR and LASD Community Transition Unit collaborated in an effort to create a Reentry Council for Los Angeles County. This project is in full swing, and it’s partnerships like these that show how a leveraging of funds and a strong partnership can lead to a safer community”, said Sheriff Lee Baca.

“With California’s recidivism rate at a record high of 70%, it is in the best interest of the people that we work together to better prepare inmates for their reentry into the community,” said David Singer, Whittier Police Department Chief. “Inmates, upon release, are required by law to return to the county of their last legal residence, and as law enforcement officers, it is our duty to uphold the law and protect our community. The construction of these facilities allows us to provide inmates with the tools to become successful members of society.”

In May of this year, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger signed Assembly Bill 900, the Public Safety and Offender Rehabilitation Services Act of 2007, a historic prison reform agreement. Chief among the provisions of Assembly Bill 900 are funding for 16,000 beds in secure community reentry facilities.

Secure community reentry facilities will enable CDCR and local communities to create an unprecedented continuity of care to provide support services. Reentry facilities will be built in cities, counties or regions willing to partner with CDCR, to assist local residents who are required to be returned to the county where they committed their offense upon release.

These facilities will provide programs and services such as: Intensive substance abuse treatment; Vocational training and job placement; Education and GED coursework; Anger management classes; Family counseling; Housing placement; and,Targeted services to help ease the transition from incarceration to a crime-free life on the outside.

This regional workshop was the eighth in a series of nine statewide regional workshops that have been organized through October 12th, 2007. In addition, on July 16 CDCR hosted an online web seminar to discuss why community reentry facilities are important to public safety.

Invited participants to the regional workshops were local government officials, sheriffs, boards of supervisors, mayors, city council members, chief probation officers, mental health professionals, drug/alcohol professionals, county administrative officers, police chiefs, district attorneys, county public works, community-based agencies, victims’ advocates, chamber of commerce, legislators, and association representatives.

Participants attended workshops discussing parolee programming needs, jail construction funding, and standards for reentry facilities.

View photo gallery of this press release

For more information on secure reentry centers, and the Governor's focus on rehabilitation through the new reforms, please visit the CDCR website at: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/News/PrisonReform.html

CDCR Contracts for Additional Out of State Beds to Reduce Overcrowding

Will Provide for 7,772 Temporary Beds Outside California Through 2011

SACRAMENTO – In its continuing effort to reduce prison overcrowding and increase access to rehabilitation programs, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today announced that it has signed a second contract with the Correctional Corporation of America (CCA) to temporarily house inmates out of state. This contract provides for an additional 3,060 out of state beds, and combined with earlier agreements, will provide for 7,772 beds by April 2009, as authorized by law.

AB 900, the Public Safety and Offender Rehabilitation Services Act of 2007, was signed by Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger last May and provides for 8,000 out of state transfers through 2011.

“Temporarily transferring inmates out of state will immediately reduce overcrowding, and allow for the Governor’s comprehensive prison reforms to be fully implemented,” said CDCR Secretary James Tilton. “It will allow for emergency beds in places like gymnasiums and dayrooms to be taken down, and increase access to medical and mental health care, and effective rehabilitation programs. “The combination of in-prison rehabilitation programs, intensive services in secure community reentry facilities, and increased parole supervision for high-risk offenders will reduce recidivism and provide long term benefits that will make our communities safer.”

California’s prison system houses an historic high of 173,000 inmates, about 18,000 of whom are sleeping in gyms, dayrooms and other areas of the prisons that were not intended for housing. Transferring inmates to private facilities in other states has already eliminated slightly more than 600 emergency beds, even though the inmate transfers are in their early stages. CDCR anticipates that continued transfer of inmates to private facilities will reduce 2,050 of those inappropriate beds by June, 2008 and 3,800 by June, 2009, when the full allotment of transfers is completed.

The Nashville-based Correctional Corporation of America is contracted to provide 4,712 beds, and currently houses 1,376 California inmates in the West Tennessee Detention Facility, The Tallahatchi (Mississippi) County Detention Facility and the Florence (Arizona) Detention Facility. Under that contract, CCA also is expected to house California inmates in North Fork (Oklahoma).

CDCR began regular movements of inmates to these facilities in June, 2007 and anticipates that 8,000 inmates will be transferred by April, 2009. Inmates transferred to out of state facilities undergo a comprehensive medical screening. Only those inmates who meet criteria established by the federal court appointed Receiver overseeing inmate medical care are eligible for transfer.

To provide additional beds under the newly signed contract, CCA is expected to construct a 3,060 bed facility at its new La Palma Correctional Center in Eloy, Arizona. The new contract is estimated at $48 million in this fiscal year, and the previous contract is estimated at $67 million this fiscal year. The contracts are valid through June, 2011, in keeping with provisions of AB 900.

The CCA contract and other information on prison reform efforts is available on the CDCR web site at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov./

Thursday, October 4, 2007

Corrections, Chowchilla Family Express Set Second Round of Free Bus Rides for Children to Visit Incarcerated Mothers

Program Served Nearly 1,600 Children, Family Members in First Six Months
CHOWCHILLA – Busloads of children, their caregivers and other family members continue to arrive at the two women’s prison in Chowchilla every Sunday, thanks to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) and the Chowchilla Family Express. The second round of the weekly program began last month to help female inmates and their families remain connected during incarceration. The program sends an average of six buses each month from northern and southern California. The first round of scheduled bus trips ended Sept. 30, and the new schedule runs through June 2008. Since the program began on March 25, 2007, 1,581 children and adults have participated.

Funded by the CDCR with a $400,000 annual budget, the bus program brings children to their parents housed in Valley State Prison for Women (VSPW) and Central California Women’s Facility (CCWF) from various parts of California. The program recognizes how valuable family reunification is to the welfare of children and the eventual post-prison success of inmates.

“We are excited about the Chowchilla Family Express because it provides yet another rehabilitative option for so many women offenders,” said Wendy Still, Associate Director for Female Offender Programs and Services, who noted that the majority of those inmates are mothers. “This bus program provides unique opportunities for female offenders to reunite with their children, who are in most cases hundreds of miles away. We remain committed to extending our responsibility for female offenders beyond their incarceration to improve their chances of success when they return to their communities.”

More than half of the women in state prisons never see their children during their incarceration. Some of the children or other family members who ride the bus have not seen their mothers in more than a year. National Institute of Corrections research shows that children who have regular parent visits demonstrate better emotional and social adjustment as well as a lower degree of juvenile delinquency. In addition, their parents demonstrate lower rates of recidivism and of higher rates of family reunification when they are released. An important part a female offender’s rehabilitation is building and strengthening systems of family support and family involvement while she is in prison. Their support can enhance their eventual return and success in their community.

“Visitation programs are a cost-effective crime prevention tool,” said Eric DeBode, Executive Director for the Chowchilla Family Express. “By helping to maintain family bonds, the Chowchilla Family Express will help parents and children stay together and hopefully reduces the likelihood of people re-offending—and that’s good for everyone.”

“This program is a great example of a deeply felt need met by exactly the right solution,” said DeBode.

For more information on the Chowchilla Family Express, call (866) 91-VISIT (866-918-4748) or visit http://www.familyexpress.us./

Bus Schedule, October 2007-June 2008

Sunday Oct. 7, 2007            San Dimas

Sunday Oct. 14, 2007          San Diego/Fresno/Madera

Sunday Oct. 21, 2007          Perris

Sunday Oct. 28, 2007          Santa Rosa/San Francisco/San Jose

Sunday Nov. 4, 2007           Los Angeles

Sunday Nov. 18, 2007         San Bernardino

Sunday Nov. 25, 2007         Redding/Chico/Sacramento/Stockton/Merced

Sunday Dec. 2, 2007           Long Beach

Sunday Dec. 9, 2007           South Central Los Angeles

Sunday Dec. 16, 2007         Antelope Valley/Bakersfield/Visalia

Sunday Jan. 6, 2008            Oakland/Modesto

Sunday Jan. 13, 2008          Anaheim/ Panorama City

Sunday Jan. 20, 2008          Santa Barbara/Oxnard/Santa Clarita

Sunday Jan. 27, 2008          San Dimas/West Covina/Monterrey Park

Sunday Feb. 3, 2008           San Diego/Fresno/Madera

Sunday Feb. 10, 2008         Perris

Sunday Feb. 24, 2008         Santa Rosa/San Francisco/San Jose

Sunday March 2, 2008        Los Angeles

Sunday March 9, 2008        San Bernardino

Sunday March 16, 2008      Chico/Sacramento/Stockton/Merced

Sunday March 30, 2008      Long Beach

Sunday April 6, 2008          South Central Los Angeles

Sunday April 13, 2008        Antelope Valley/Bakersfield/Visalia

Sunday April 20, 2008        Oakland/Modesto

Sunday April 27, 2008        Anaheim/Panorama City

Sunday May 4, 2008          Santa Barbara/Oxnard/Santa Clarita

Sunday May 18, 2008        San Dimas/West Covina/Monterrey Park

Sunday June 1, 2008         San Diego/Fresno/Madera

Sunday June 8, 2008          Perris

Sunday June 15, 2008        Santa Rosa/San Francisco/San Jose

Sunday June 22, 2008        Los Angeles

Sunday June 29. 2008        San Bernardino



Background: As part of its comprehensive female offender reform efforts, the CDCR created a strategic plan in 2006 to improve outcomes for female offenders. It implemented gender-appropriate operational practices, programming, medical, mental health and dental care, and “wrap-around” treatment programs and services. CDCR, using previously cited research, found that female offenders differ from their male counterparts in a variety of ways. For example, a female offender is likely to have been the primary caretaker of young children at the time of her arrest, to have experienced physical and/or sexual abuse, and have distinct physical and mental health needs.

Monday, October 1, 2007

“Day on the Green” Career Fair Connects Youth Offenders with Mentors and Support in their Local Community

Positive Intervention Offers Alternatives to Crime, Improves Public Safety

STOCKTON – The N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility High School/Career Academy hosted its second annual Career Fair on Saturday, September 29. The event was called “Day on the Green” because it was set up on the athletic field in the middle of the Chaderjian campus.

This year The Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) collaborated with many different types of organizations that specialize in services such as job placement, housing assistance, and apprenticeship and mentoring programs, as well as several vendors that assisted in sponsoring the program. The purpose of this event was to provide DJJ youth with transitional resources to network with community, state, county and faith-based organizations.

These organizations were invited to come inside the correctional facility to provide guiding relationships with the wards at the Chaderjian facility. Motivational speakers, music, poetry, and singing groups were also there to entertain and reward wards who have demonstrated good behavior in-custody, and encourage positive choices upon release. The event provided an opportunity for wards to meet with potential mentors, and for service providers in the local community to connect with youth.

“These types of events provide not only hope – but guidance to youthful offenders. It’s important to show wards that there are individuals and organizations out there willing to open doors for them, if they will only take advantage of the opportunities,” said Secretary James Tilton, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. “Many of these youth have not had strong role models or mentors growing up. Connecting them with support networks in their local community is very important to their future success.”

Bernard Warner, Chief Deputy Secretary of the Division of Juvenile Justice was in attendance along with representatives from the City of Tracy, the Stockton Mayor’s Office and individuals representing organizations from a number of nearby counties, including San Joaquin County.

Tickets to a Raiders football game, an overnight pass to a hotel in Morro Bay, DVD movies and candy were raffled off to volunteers, staff, and youth.

“As expected this activity was a complete success thanks to the dedication of the community, the hard work of the volunteers and staff, and of course to the youth of N.A. Chaderjian,” said Warner. “These types of positive interventions offer youth who have been in trouble alternatives to crime. Community involvement in rehabilitation at this young age reduces the likelihood that they’ll re-offend, and improves public safety.”

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CIM Inmates Contribute to Chino Charity that helps crime victims

$6,000 donated from wages earned in prison industries will help less fortunate

Chino…..Inmates from the California Institution for Men contributed $6,000 to Chino Neighborhood House, an organization that provides help for crime victims, during a presentation to the Chino City Council last evening.

The contribution, which was presented by CIM Warden Mike Poulos and Joe Armor, manager of Joint Venture Program for the Prison Industry Authority, represented 20 percent of the wages earned by nine inmates who work for Earthwise Recycling, which converts stale bread and other bakery goods into cattle feed.

“Providing jobs for inmates gives them skills that will help them succeed when they are released from prison,” said Charles Pattillo, general manager of the Prison Industry Authority, a self-supporting, state government organization that operates many manufacturing facilities within the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. “In addition, recognizing the harm they have done to victims by the crimes they committed and atoning for them is a big step in the rehabilitation of inmates.”

“When I became the Warden of the California Institution for Men, I made a commitment that CIM would partner with the local community and help serve the needs of local residents. The Chino prison has a long history in this community and is fortunate to be a part of many wonderful originations serving the residents who live here. Through cooperation with CIM, the Prison Industry Authority and the Joint Venture Program, we are able to give back to local organizations that struggle to serve citizens.

It was through the partnership with the local city officials and community leaders that I became aware of the services provided by the Chino Neighborhood House; a local organization that champions the cause of serving those less fortunate and in their time of need, including those who are victims of crimes, by filling a need for food, clothing, and vouchers. It is my honor and privilege on behalf of all of the employees and inmates at CIM to support the great work being done at the Chino Neighborhood House.”

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