Monday, August 31, 2009

CDCR Secretary Issues Statement About Two Los Angeles Fire Department Firefighters Who Died in the Line of Duty

Mount Gleason Conservation Camp Destroyed by the Station Fire

SACRAMENTO — Two County of Los Angeles Fire Department firefighters, Fire Captain Tedmund “Ted” Hall and Firefighter Specialist Arnaldo “Arnie” Quinones, assigned to the Mount Gleason Conservation Camp #16 located near Palmdale in Los Angeles County, tragically lost their lives on August 30, 2009. Moreover, the camp, one of the first of five Los Angeles County Fire Department wild land fire camps, was destroyed by the Station Fire. California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) Secretary Matthew Cate issued the following statement:

“Fire Captain Ted Hall and Firefighter Specialist Arnie Quinones worked hand in hand with CDCR staff at Mount Gleason Conservation Camp to provide supervision and training to the inmates assigned there. They are to be credited with helping to save the lives of three CDCR employees and 55 inmates. When fire threatened to engulf the Mount Gleason Conservation Camp and all who still remained there, Captain Hall, Firefighter Specialist Quinones and other Los Angeles County Fire Department personnel coolly provided direction and worked with CDCR staff to ensure everyone’s safety. Tragically, they perished in the fire. If it wasn’t for their selfless actions, the loss of life could have been greater. On behalf of everyone at CDCR we are humbled and honored by their sacrifice.”

All the inmates who had been assigned to the Mount Gleason Conservation Camp are either still battling wildfires around the state or were relocated to the Francisquito Conservation Camp near Saugus, also in Los Angeles County. As of August 31, there are 2,245 adult inmates and 53 Division of Juvenile Justice youth deployed to fires statewide, including Los Angeles, Riverside, and 15 other counties. They are supervised by 187 correctional officers and supervisors.

The Mount Gleason Conservation Camp opened in 1979. Located deep in the Angeles National Forest at an abandoned missile base that at one time helped protect the Los Angeles basin from nuclear threat, the camp served to help protect Californians from wild fires. The camp was located atop a mountain ridge at a 5,500 foot elevation, housed 105 inmate firefighters, and provided six fire crews in a joint partnership between CDCR and the County of Los Angeles Fire Department.

Thursday, August 27, 2009

CDCR Parole Agents Help Uncover 18-year-old Mystery Concerning Kidnapping of Jaycee Lee Dugard


SACRAMENTO - The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation's (CDCR) Division of Adult Parole Operations helped to uncover a nearly 18-year-old mystery concerning the kidnapping of Jaycee Lee Dugard, who was 11 years old when she was last seen as she walked to her bus stop in South Lake Tahoe, California, on June 10, 1991.

On August 26, 2009, a CDCR parole agent brought in parolee Phillip Garrido for questioning. The day before, suspicious activity had been reported when Garrido, a registered sex offender, was seen with two small children at U.C. Berkeley.

CDCR involved the Concord Police Department to assist in determining the identity of the two children and an adult female who accompanied Garrido to CDCR's parole office in Concord. The diligent questioning and follow up by the parolee's agent of record led to Garrido revealing his kidnapping of the adult female. It was further revealed by Garrido that she was Jaycee Lee Dugard and that the children were his.

Garrido and his wife were arrested and transported to the Concord Jail. The FBI with the full cooperation of CDCR and local law enforcement officials are conducting a full investigation surrounding Garrido and further information is pending those investigations.

On June 8, 1999, Garrido was paroled from a Nevada state prison. Garrido, 58, served time in federal custody and in Nevada for sexual assault. Garrido's prior arrest history consists of possession of marijuana. While on parole supervision in California, Garrido was subject to: anti narcotic testing, to refrain from alcohol, and global positioning system (GPS) monitoring.

Officials with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation's Division of Adult Parole Operations will be holding a briefing to answer questions on the matter today.

DJJ Announces New Staffing Model and Consolidation of Youth to Control Costs

State's Largest Youth Correctional Facility, Heman G. Stark, to Close

SACRAMENTO - The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today announced that it will close the state's largest facility for juvenile offenders, the Heman G. Stark Youth Correctional Facility in Chino, as a cost-cutting move in response to a declining population as more youth are committed to county facilities. The move is part of a broader staffing model being implemented by the Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) designed to better align the make-up of its professional staff with the treatment needs of its current population and to reflect its reduced operational expenses.

The staffing model will ensure that the DJJ has the right combination of employee classifications and sufficient number of staff to treat the current population. The complex process to "right-size" the DJJ staff ultimately is expected to eliminate more than 400 positions - or nearly 14 percent of its workforce - by December 2009. Savings are estimated at $30-$40 million.

"These changes will allow the DJJ to operate more effectively and efficiently as the state adapts to changes in our youth population and meet the treatment requirements established by the courts," said CDCR Secretary Matthew Cate. "This new DJJ business plan includes closures and realignment of staff that will allow the state to significantly reduce the cost per youthful offender of providing custody, treatment, and services."

The closure of the Heman G. Stark facility and the staff changes are intended to meet a commitment made earlier this year by CDCR Secretary Matthew Cate to reduce treatment costs per youth from $252,000 to a goal of $175,000.

The Heman G. Stark facility, which opened in 1959, currently houses slightly less than 400 youth who will be redirected to other DJJ facilities with a goal of retaining as many youth as possible in Southern California. The facility is expected to be re-used for adult inmates by CDCR's Division of Adult Institutions. The timing of the conversion is yet to be decided.

The number of youthful offenders in the DJJ has declined over the last decade, from a peak of nearly 10,000 to its current population of approximately 1,700, largely due to legislation (SB 81 and AB 191) that resulted in most youthful offenders being committed to county facilities.

Although the DJJ population represent less than half of one percent of all youths arrested in California, it includes those with the most violent criminal backgrounds and who have exceptional treatment needs that cannot be addressed by county programs. Also, unlike nearly all other juvenile justice programs in the nation, the DJJ can retain youth to the age of 25 if they are not remanded to an adult prison at the age of 18.

Another distinction of the juvenile system that sets it apart from adult prisons is its network of accredited schools that provide youth with the same education they would receive in public schools, in addition to counseling and treatment programs.

Since 2006, the DJJ has been reforming its programs to meet treatment levels outlined in a series of six remedial plans, the result of a legal settlement supervised by the Alameda Superior Court. The plans set treatment and staffing requirements for medical and mental health care, education, sexual behavior treatment, preserving the safety and welfare of youth, and for accommodating wards with disabilities. To comply with those requirements, DJJ is developing new treatment models that emphasize more interaction between DJJ youth and staff with more intervention and counseling and less use of force to prevent crisis and improve rehabilitation.

"We have been making tremendous progress in reforming the juvenile justice program," said Bernard Warner, Chief Deputy Secretary of the Division of Juvenile Justice. "As a result, our facilities are much safer and less violent and more youth are receiving an education and treatment while they are in our care."

The closure of Heman G. Stark is consistent with realignments that have been underway in the division in recent years as the population has been reduced. The DJJ has closed eight locations, including facilities in Stockton, Whittier, Mariposa, Nevada City, Santa Cruz, and Paso Robles in 2003, 2004, 2005, and 2008 respectively.

The closure of Heman G. Stark Correctional Center in San Bernardino County, announced today, is consistent with realignments that have been underway in the Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) in recent years. Since 2003, DJJ has closed five facilities in Stockton, Whittier and Paso Robles and three conservation camps located in Mariposa, Nevada and Santa Cruz counties. When the closure of Heman G. Stark as a juvenile facility is completed, the DJJ will continue to operate five facilities and two conservation camps.

The closures include:

September, 2003: Karl Holten Drug and Alcohol Abuse Treatment Center, Stockton, Ca.

February, 2004: Northern Youth Correctional Reception Center and Clinic, Sacramento

May, 2004: Fred C. Nelles Youth Correctional Facility, Whittier

July, 2008: El Paso de Robles, Paso Robles, Stockton

                  Dewitt Nelson Youth Correctional Facility, Stockton

August, 2009: Heman G. Stark Youth Correctional Facility (announced)


The remaining DJJ facilities include:

N.A.Chadjerian Youth Correctional Facility, Stockton

O.H. Close Youth Correctional Facility, Stockton

Preston Youth Correctional Facility, Ione

Ventura Youth Correctional Facility, Camarillo

Southern Youth Correctional Reception Center and Clinic, Norwalk


The DJJ also operates two conservation camps

Pine Grove Youth Conservation Camp, Pine Grove

S. Carraway Public Service and Fire Center, Camarillo

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

CDCR Uses GPS to Exclude Child Sex Offender Parolees from Attending California State Fair

SACRAMENTO - The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR), Division of Adult Parole Operations is using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology to monitor sex offender parolees who visit the California State Fair at Cal Expo.

"When it comes to the supervision of sex offenders we cannot and will not compromise public safety," said Dan Stone, Regional Administrator for the Division of Adult Parole Operations. “With hundreds of families planning to attend along with their children, we plan to put GPS monitoring capability to good use, which further promotes a safe environment,” added Stone.

Termed “Operation Eagle Eye”, Parole Agents have established an exclusion zone around the perimeter of Cal Expo for the duration of the State Fair. “The purpose of this operation is to enhance public safety by ensuring GPS parolee compliance with the terms and conditions of parole utilizing state of the art technology that we now have as part of our supervision capabilities” said Marvin Speed, District Parole Administrator.

California is the nation's leader in using GPS technology to track sex offenders. Today, of California’s approximate 92,000 sex offenders, 6,800 are parolees on active supervision. Every sex offender on active parole has GPS monitoring as part of their supervision requirements. Prior to the use of GPS, parole agents used the old way of verifying compliance, driving the streets and talking to acquaintances of the parolee.

“This operation would not be possible without the assistance and cooperation of the Cal Expo Police Department,” said Stone. “Parole Agents from Sacramento and surrounding counties have worked with the Cal Expo authorities during the State Fair for years but this is the first time utilizing the benefits of GPS technology.”

Any sex offender parolee who enters the Cal Expo zone will set off an alert notifying Agents of their whereabouts. Once a notification is received, on-site agents will track the offender’s movement and investigate if any law, parole violation or any public safety issue exists and take appropriate action.

Click here to learn more about how CDCR parole agents implement GPS.

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

Sunday, August 9, 2009

Update On Aug. 8 Disturbance at the California Institution for Men (CIM)

Chino – Staff continue to evaluate the extent of inmate injuries and damages to state property following the riot that occurred on Saturday, Aug. 08, 2009, with inmates at the California Institution for Men, Reception Center West Facility.

Thirty-eight inmates of the initial 55 inmates who were transferred to local community hospital for medical treatment for more serious injuries have been returned or are en-route back to the institution following medical treatment.

Preliminary assessments have been made to the housing units, which sustained extensive damage by the rioting inmates. Most of the housing units are currently uninhabitable, including one housing dormitory that was completely destroyed by fire.

Upon completion of medical evaluations of all 1300 inmates at the RC-West Facility to determine the extent of their injuries, some inmates were moved to separate facilities at CIM. An assessment is also being conducted to determine, which inmates can be transferred to another institution within the state.

There have been no reports of any staff injuries as a direct result of the inmate related violence. The institution is still on lock-down, pending investigation into the reason for the fighting. All inmate visitations have been suspended.

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Secretary Matthew Cate toured the institution today to assess the situation and to speak to staff. “I want to commend CIM acting Warden Aref Fakhoury and the courageous CIM staff who responded to end this major disturbance.” He also praised staff from nearby institutions for their assistance and gave his sincere appreciation and thanks to local law enforcement agencies who responded from the cities of Chino, Chino Hills and Ontario, along with and the Chino Valley Independent Fire District for their assistance

California Institution for Men, which opened in 1941, serves as a Reception Center for parolees returning to custody and newly committed male felons from several Southern California counties. The Reception Center completes diagnostic tests, medical and mental health screening, and literary assessments for classification in order to determine inmates’ appropriate institutional placement. CIM houses currently 5,911 inmates and employs approximately 2,100 people.

See original story here

See August 11, 2009 update here

Major Prison Disturbance at the California Institution for Men

CHINO - At approximately 8:20 p.m. on Aug. 8, inmates housed at the California Institution for Men (CIM), Reception Center West Facility began fighting in their assigned housing units. The fighting was contained to that facility, which currently houses approximately 1,300 medium security level inmates.

Correctional staff immediately responded, formed into tactical units, and systematically regained control of the housing units, stopping the inmates from rioting by using batons, O.C. pepper spray, less lethal force, and lethal force options. Staff secured the housing units by 7 a.m. Sunday morning.

As a result of the incident, more than 200 inmates have been treated by medical staff at the institution for minor non-life threatening injuries and 55 inmates, with more serious injuries, have been transported to a local outside hospitals for treatment.

No staff were injured as a result of the incident. It has been reported that significant property damage was sustained, including one housing unit that sustained extensive damage due to fire. The incident was fully contained to the RC-West Facility, and has not affected the other facilities of the institution. The institution has been placed on lock-down, pending investigation into the reason for the fighting. As of Sunday morning, all Southern California correctional institutions remain on lockdown until further notice. Visitation has been suspended until further notice at all institutions in lockdown.

Aref Fakhoury, acting Warden for the California Institution for Men praised all who assisted in quelling the disturbance. "I want to thank all of the staff at CIM for their quick and courageous response to stop this major disturbance. Staff's dedication to duty was displayed tonight by how quickly and safely they were able to control the inmates fighting." He also praised staff from nearby institutions, along with police departments from the cities of Chino, Chino Hills, and Ontario, and the Chino Valley Independent Fire District for their assistance.

CDCR Administration is suspending intake of new inmates to CIM until staff complete the investigation and evaluation of the incident.

California Institution for Men, which opened in 1941, serves as a Reception Center for parolees returning to custody and newly committed male felons from several Southern California counties. The Reception Center completes diagnostic tests, medical and mental health screening, and literary assessments for classification in order to determine inmates' appropriate institutional placement. CIM houses currently 5,911 inmates and employs approximately 2,100 people.

See update on this story here