Tuesday, July 27, 2010

Inmate Homicide Incident at San Quentin State Prison

San Quentin – San Quentin State Prison officials are investigating an inmate homicide that occurred on the prison’s reception center yard Monday morning.

At 10:35 a.m. on July 26, 2010, inmate Edward John Schaefer, 44, was stabbed in the chest and neck with an inmate-made weapon. He was taken by ambulance to an outside medical facility where he was pronounced dead at 9:03 p.m. Monday.

Schaefer was received from Marin County on July 16, 2010 with a 24-years-to-life sentence for second-degree murder and gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated. In 2005, Schaefer served a four-year sentence from Marin County for corporal injury to a spouse.

The incident is being investigated as a homicide by the prison’s Investigative Services Unit. Prison investigators have identified inmate Frank Anthony Souza, 31, as the primary suspect. Investigators are looking into whether other inmates were involved.

Inmate Souza was received from Santa Clara County on Jan. 12, 2010 with a 60-years-to-life sentence for first-degree murder. Souza has three prior commitments: in 1998, he served a one-year, six-month sentence from Santa Clara County for grand theft; in 1999, he served a two-year sentence for receiving stolen property; and in 2002 he served a four-year sentence from Santa Clara County for threatening a prosecution witness with force and violence.

The Marin County District Attorney’s Office has been contacted and the Office of the Inspector General’s Bureau of Independent Review was also notified of the incident.

Open since 1852, San Quentin State Prison is California’s oldest prison. It houses 5,027 inmates and employs 2,236 people. San Quentin includes a reception center for new commitments and parole violators, general population units, a minimum-security work crew unit, and units housing male condemned inmates.

Contact:

Lt. Samuel Robinson
(415) 455-5008
Terry Thornton
(916) 445-4950


# # #

Friday, July 23, 2010

Herzog to Remain in Custody After Court Confirms Error in their Sentencing Credits


SACRAMENTO - The San Joaquin County Superior Court this afternoon informed the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) that they are correcting the credits calculation for Loren Herzog, who will remain in the department’s custody for at least the next several weeks.

The San Joaquin County Superior Court confirmed their error and ordered the department to retain Herzog. Once the corrected order from the court is received, CDCR case records analysts will recalculate a final release date.

During the next several weeks, CDCR will continue to work with San Joaquin County officials on Herzog’s correct parole date.

California law mandates that inmates be released to parole after completion of their sentence. Herzog, who is serving a determinate sentence, will be released to parole after serving all the time he is statutorily required to serve. California Law does not allow CDCR any authority to change or challenge a release on a determinate sentence.

Inmate History

In December 2001, Herzog was convicted in Santa Clara County, a change of venue from San Joaquin County, and sentenced to 78-years-to-life (three consecutive 25-to-life terms plus three years for being an accessory to a felony). In 2004, a state appellate court threw out the three murder convictions and much of the evidence against Herzog. It led to a plea bargain and Herzog pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter. On Dec. 8, 2004, he began serving a 14-year determinate sentence for voluntary manslaughter, three counts of being an accessory to a felony, and one count for transportation of a controlled substance. Time credit was applied for time served in county jail and state prison.


Contact:
Gordon Hinkle or Luis Patino
(916) 445-4950

###

Thursday, July 22, 2010

Pleasant Valley State Prison Minimum Security Facility Escapee Captured

Coalinga – An escaped inmate from Pleasant Valley State Prison has been captured.

Antonio Montelongo Jaureque, who escaped from the Minimum Support Facility on July 10, 2010, was captured in Fresno County by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR), Special Service Unit, this morning at approximately 11:45 a.m.

CDCR special agents spotted Jaureque in Fresno and initiated a vehicle stop. Jaureque ran from the vehicle and was arrested after a brief pursuit. He was transported back to Pleasant Valley State Prison; arriving at approximately 2: 45 p.m. Jaureque, 24, was received by CDCR April 6, 2010, from Fresno County for a parole violation, from a commitment offense of Vehicle Theft in 2007. He was scheduled to parole August 2010.

Pleasant Valley State Prison is located in Coalinga California. The prison opened in 1994 and houses approximately 4,700 minimum-, medium-, and maximum-custody inmates. Approximately 1,700 people work at the Fresno County Prison.

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation continues to maintain a 99.1% apprehension rate since 1977

Requests for further information should be directed to Aaron Shimmin,
Public Information Officer, Pleasant Valley State Prison, at (559) 935-4972.

Contact:
Lt. Aaron Shimmin
(559) 935-4972

###

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Inmate Back in Custody after Escaping From Wasco State Prison

WASCO - This afternoon at approximately 1:00 p.m. inmate Eric Rodriguez surrendered to a CHP Officer in Fresno.

The CHP were doing routine sweeps of stolen vehicles in the area of a family member’s home, when Rodriguez exited the home with his hands in the air.

Rodriguez escaped Friday morning, July 16, 2010 after arriving at Wasco from Kern County. He was to begin serving a five-year sentence for battery on a prisoner.

Inmate Rodriguez, 31, is from Fresno and is a member of the Fresno Bulldogs gang.

He arrived back at Wasco State Prison this afternoon a 5 p.m.

Contact:

Cassandra Hockenson
(916) 445-4950
Brian Kibler
(661) 758-7601


# # #

Friday, July 16, 2010

Inmate Escapes at Wasco State Prison

WASCO - Special agents from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) are looking for an inmate who was inadvertently released from Wasco State Prison on July 16.

Inmate Eric Rodriguez, 31, escaped custody after arriving from Kern County earlier today to begin serving a five-year sentence for battery on a prisoner. He is also known to have lived in Fresno County.

However during processing, inmate Eric Rodriguez was inadvertently released instead of an inmate sharing the same last name who was scheduled to be released for parole the same day.

Inmate Rodriguez is a male Hispanic, approximately 5’10” and 150 pounds, with black hair (possibly bald) and brown eyes. He has a distinctive tattoo on his left arm and a large snake covering his lower chest and abdomen. He is considered dangerous.

CDCR is conducting a security assessment of the incident and a review of parole procedures. Special Agents with CDCR’s Office of Correctional Safety have been dispatched to the area to search for Rodriguez. Law enforcement has been notified.

Anyone who knows the whereabouts of inmate Rodriguez should call 9-1-1 immediately.

Contact:

Cassandra Hockenson
(916) 445- 4950
Henry Cervantez
(661)758-8400 x5006

California State Prison-Sacramento Minimum Security Escapee Captured

An escaped inmate from California State Prison Sacramento has been captured.

Zachary Dickens, who was discovered missing from the Minimum Support Facility on July 15, 2010, was captured in Sacramento County by the Special Service Unit at approximately 5:20 PM and he surrendered with no resistance.

California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation special agents took custody of Dickens and will be transporting him back to California State Prison Sacramento.

Dickens, 27, was received from Sacramento County on March 18, 2010, and was serving a four year sentence for Corporal Injury to a Spouse. He was scheduled for release December 22, 2011.

California State Prison-Sacramento is a multi-mission institution that houses more than 3,100 inmates and employs nearly 1,700 people. Opened in 1986, the institution houses maximum-security inmates serving long sentences and those who have proved to be management problems at other institutions. The institution also serves as a medical hub for Northern California. The institution has minimum supervision inmates, like Dickens, outside the prison’s perimeter to assist with maintenance and other tasks to support the operation of the prison.

Contact:

Mike York:
916-294-3012



#####

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Inmate Escapes Minimum Support Facility at California State Prison-Sacramento in Folsom

Folsom -- Law enforcement officials are searching for an inmate who walked away early this morning from the Minimum Support Facility at California State Prison-Sacramento.

At approximately 6:30 a.m., inmate Zachary Dickens was found missing from his bunk in a dormitory setting. Dickens, 27, was received from Sacramento County on March 18, 2010, and was serving a four year sentence for Corporal Injury to a Spouse. He was scheduled for release December 22, 2011. Dickens is described as being a white male five feet ten inches tall and weighing approximately 195 pounds with brown eyes and brown hair.

All local law enforcement agencies and the California Highway Patrol have been notified to assist in the search for Dickens. Escape pursuit efforts have been activated and any one seeing him should contact authorities immediately.

California State Prison-Sacramento is a multi-mission institution that houses more than 3,100 inmates and employs nearly 1,700 people. Opened in 1986, the institution houses maximum-security inmates serving long sentences and those who have proved to be management problems at other institutions. The institution also serves as a medical hub for Northern California. The institution has minimum supervision inmates, like Dickens, outside the prison’s perimeter to assist with maintenance and other tasks to support the operation of the prison.

Contact:

Mike York
916-294-3012

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Inmate Caught After Escaping From Pleasant Valley State Prison Minimum-Security Facility


Coalinga – This morning at approximately 1:10 a.m. a Los Angeles County inmate was discovered to be missing during an unannounced count at the Minimum Support Facility at Pleasant Valley State Prison. Emergency procedures were immediately initiated and search teams were dispatched. At approximately 1:50 a.m. the escapee, Jeovani Rivera Orozco, was apprehended on prison grounds without incident.

Orozco is a minimum-security inmate housed in a 150-man dormitory outside the prison’s secure perimeter. He was committed to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation from Los Angeles County on December 9, 2009, serving a 3-year, 8-month sentence for second-degree burglary.

Orozco is the second inmate to escape from Pleasant Valley State Prison within a week. Both escapes were from the prison’s outside dormitories where low-level offenders are housed. No inmate has ever escaped from the prison’s lethal electrified fence.
Inmate Antonio Montelongo Jaureque escaped on Saturday, July 10, 2010, and remains at large. Jaureque, 24, is a Hispanic male from Fresno County, 6’0” tall, 210 pounds, with brown eyes and brown hair. Jaureque has tattoos on the right side of his neck and both hands. Anyone with any information regarding Jaureque should contact the prison, local authorities, or 9-1-1.

Pleasant Valley State Prison is located in Coalinga, California. The prison opened in 1994 and houses approximately 4,700 minimum-, medium-, and maximum-custody inmates. Approximately 1,700 people work at the Fresno County prison.

Requests for further information should be directed to Aaron Shimmin, Public Information Officer, Pleasant Valley State Prison, at (559) 935-4972.

Contact:

Lt. Aaron Shimmin
(559) 935-4972

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Juvenile Offenders Learn New Life Skills In Dog Training Program

Abandoned Dogs Benefit From Program that Teaches Compassion and Caring

SACRAMENTO – Nine juvenile offenders from the Southern Correctional Reception Center and Clinic graduated today from a unique program that teaches personal skills that will help them live more constructively when they return to their communities. They received informal diplomas in patience, compassion, discipline and responsibility after spending the last 12 weeks caring for abandoned and abused dogs rescued from a Southern California animal shelter and training them in basic obedience skills so that the dogs could be united with new owners who adopted them.

Four dogs rescued from the Southeast Animal Control Authority in Downey represent the third graduating class of the Pups and Wards Program (PAWS), which is exclusively offered at the Division of Juvenile Justice facility in Norwalk. It is designed to teach care-giving techniques and life skills to youthful offenders by making them responsible for a live animal.

“This program provides an opportunity for youth to perform a service to the community and teaches them skills such as compassion, patience and responsibility, which will help them throughout their lives after they return to their communities,” said Bernard Warner, Chief Deputy Secretary for Juvenile Justice, Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

The four dogs have received around the clock care from the youth, who were responsible for creating a nurturing environment where the animals could be rehabilitated from previous abuse and for training them in basic obedience commands. The program gives youth the opportunity to learn new skills to get a fresh start in life, much like the dogs they cared for.

During the graduation ceremonies at the Norwalk facility, youth put the dogs through their paces, showing off their newfound skills to follow commands. The dogs then left the facility with their new owners, who were matched by Janette Thomas, from the Pawsitivity Dog Training Program, who also tutored the youth on how to care for and train the dogs.

More information on treatment programs for youthful offenders is available at www.cdcr.ca.gov/juvenile justice.

Contact:

Bill Sessa, (916) 205-9193
Pam Robinson (562) 572-1673

CDCR Provides GPS Monitoring of Parolees During Annual State Fair To Ensure Event is a Family-Friendly Safe Zone

Event kicks off Summer GPS compliance monitoring effort

SACRAMENTO – A GPS safe zone monitoring parolee sex offenders — Operation Eagle Eye II — will be deployed by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) at the California State Fair (July 14 - Aug. 1) for the second year.




Using GPS technology, parole agents will be alerted if any sex offender on active parole enters the state fairgrounds from July 14 through August 1.

“Our message to those strapped with GPS monitors is to stay away from events like the State Fair,” said CDCR’s Division of Adult Parole Operations Director Robert Ambroselli. “If GPS shows you are in violation of your terms, you will be arrested.”

This effort, called Operation Eagle Eye II, kicks off the department’s campaign statewide at various fairs and other large public gatherings, to ensure that parolees wearing the state-of-the-art technology don’t violate their terms of parole and pose a potential risk to public safety. Plans include GPS monitoring at more than a dozen county and city events through the fall months.

The CDCR participation is part of a multi-agency law enforcement campaign that Cal Expo officials conduct every year to ensure that probationers, parolees, and gang members are monitored and are in compliance with their terms of parole and probation.

“We truly appreciate this ongoing partnership with the Cal Expo Police Chief and our fellow law enforcement agencies who all are paying special attention at large public events like this so that families and their loved ones can enjoy a carefree day at the State Fair,” said Ambroselli.

During 2009, some 35 sex offenders on parole were arrested during compliance checks at six fairs throughout California for violating terms of their parole where GPS monitoring was conducted. Last year, five sex offenders were arrested for non-compliance after trying to enter the State Fair.

“We are working in partnership with state parole agents to help in our mission to stay focused on a safe atmosphere so families can stay late and have a good time,” said Robert L. Craft, Chief of Police, California Exposition and State Fair Police.

During fair time, Craft said he can draw from nearly 433 officers from 33 agencies in the region to help his police force patrol the grounds during the State Fair’s 19-day run. The GPS monitoring will occur in the background, with a parole agent able to respond in minutes if a GPS-wearing parolee comes on the fairgrounds.

California’s parole division utilizes GPS technology daily to track and monitor sex offenders on parole. CDCR’s use of current technology and its partnerships with local law enforcement is helping improve public safety throughout the state.

For more information on CDCR Parole and the GPS program, please visit this link: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Parole/index.html

For Information about the California State Fair, please visit the link below: http://www.bigfun.org/

Contact:
George Kostyrko
Paul Verke
(916) 445-4950

Sunday, July 11, 2010

Inmate Hunger Strike and Work Stoppage at the California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison at Corcoran

Corcoran – Inmates on Facility-A, a medium security yard at the California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison at Corcoran (CSATF/SP), participated in a hunger strike and work stoppage this weekend in protest of a lockdown which began on July 9, 2010. Tonight, most inmates began accepting and eating their meals.

Facility-A was placed on lockdown Friday due to the discovery of inmate manufactured stabbing-type weapons on the recreation yard. The lockdown affects approximately 830 inmates that are assigned to Facility-A. During the lockdown staff will be searching the facility for possible additional weapons.

On the morning of July 10, 2010, inmates on Facility-A refused to report to their job assignments, which include kitchen, clerical support, and janitorial duties. Additionally, the majority of the inmates, stating they were on a hunger strike in protest of the lockdown, refused to accept their breakfast meal.

“Given the discovery of inmate manufactured weapons, we are redoubling our efforts to assure the safety and security of inmates and staff,” said Warden Kathleen Allison. “We have policies and procedures in place to manage work stoppages which allow for critical operations to continue,” she said. “Inmates participating in a hunger strike are monitored, assessed, and provided needed medical care and treatment.”

In response to the protest, prison officials met with inmates in an attempt to answer questions and resolve any concerns related to the lockdown. Meals were continuously offered to all inmates during the protest. Inmates with health concerns did not participate in the hunger strike. When Sunday’s dinner was served, almost every inmate was observed eating their meal, indicating an end to the protest.

Several inmates were identified as instigators of the protest. These individuals were removed from the facility and placed in an Administrative Segregation Unit, separating them from the general population.

The California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison at Corcoran, a maximum security prison, is located five miles south of the city of Corcoran. The prison opened in 1997, houses approximately 6,700 medium and maximum–custody inmates and employs approximately 2,000 people.

NOTE- The California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison at Corcoran should not be confused with Corcoran State Prison. They are two different facilities.

Contact:
Lieutenant Stephen Smith
(559) 992-7154
(559) 331-6856

Saturday, July 10, 2010

Inmate Escapes from Pleasant Valley State Prison

For immediate release

Contact:
Lt. Aaron Shimmin
(559) 935-4972

Coalinga – This morning at approximately 3:10 a.m. a Fresno County inmate was discovered to have escaped from the Minimum Support Facility at Pleasant Valley State Prison.

Antonio Montelongo Jaureque a Minimum Security inmate housed in a 150-man dormitory outside the Prison’s secure perimeter was last seen about 1:50 a.m. Juareque is a 24 year old Hispanic Male, 6’0” tall, 210 pounds, with brown eyes, and brown hair. Jaureque has tattoos on the right side of his neck and both hands. He was committed to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation from Fresno County on April 6, 2010, for a parole violation. Juareque had an original controlling commitment offense of vehicle theft in 2007. Jaureque was scheduled to parole August of 2010.

Custody personnel are searching the entire Prison grounds and the immediate area of the surrounding community with local law enforcement agencies to apprehend the escapee. Anyone seeing him should contact authorities immediately.

Pleasant Valley State Prison is located in Coalinga, California, opened in 1994, and houses approximately 4,700 minimum, medium, and maximum custody inmates. Approximately 1,700 people work at the Fresno County prison.

Requests for further information should be directed to Aaron Shimmin, Public Information Officer, Pleasant valley State Prison, at (559) 935-4972.

###

Thursday, July 8, 2010

Inmate escapes from Washington Ridge Conservation Camp

For Immediate Release

Contact:
Watch Commander, (530) 257-2181x4173 or
Washington Ridge Conservation Camp at (530) 265-4623

Nevada City – A minimum-security inmate from California Correctional Center escaped from Washington Ridge Conservation Camp late Wednesday night, July 7, 2010 at approximately 9:45 p.m.

Inmate Jeffery Shook, 36, is a White male, 205 pounds, 6 foot 2 inches tall, brown hair and hazel eyes. He was committed to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on February 2, 2006 from Orange County for vehicle theft. He was scheduled to be paroled in April 2013.

Inmate Shook was last seen just prior to the 9:45 p.m. count at Washington Ridge, a conservation camp outside Nevada City, Nevada County. The camp houses minimum-custody inmates.

Staff searched the facility grounds and the immediate area surrounding the camp after the escape but Shook was not found. All local law enforcement agencies and the California Highway Patrol were notified and are assisting CDCR custody staff and Special Service Unit agents in the search for Shook.

Escape apprehension efforts are continuing. Anyone seeing him should contact 9-1-1 or law enforcement authorities immediately.

# # #
Contact:

Anyone having information about or knowledge of the location of Jeffery Shook should contact the California Correctional Center Watch Commander at 530-257-2181x4173 or Washington Ridge Conservation Camp at (530) 265-4623.