Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Three Correctional Officers Assaulted at CSP-LAC

Six Inmates Placed in Administrative Segregation

SACRAMENTO -- Three correctional officers were treated and released after being attacked Tuesday during the morning meal by inmates at California State Prison-Los Angeles County in Lancaster.

Six inmates, so far, have been identified as being involved and have been placed in Administrative Segregation, pending investigation.

The most seriously injured in the attack, a female correctional officer, sustained bruising and swelling of the face, shoulder and neck area. Injuries to two male correctional officers were described as burns to the left thigh and left wrist of one and a deep laceration of the forehead and bruising around both eyes of the other. The prognosis for each is good.

Staff used force to end the assault and to ensure compliance by other inmates during the incident. The force consisted of the use of pepper spray, physical force and one baton round from a 40mm launcher.

The assault occurred about 7:45 a.m., June 28, in the dining hall of the Reception Center. As the inmates were being seated, two of them initiated the attack. Two other inmates did not immediately comply with orders to get down, but did so after force was used. Another two inmates were later found to have minor injuries consistent with being involved in the assault. No weapons were used by the inmates.

The inmates involved in the assault incurred minor injuries.

The Reception Center is operating under restrictions, but the remainder of the institution has returned to normal operation.

The Investigative Services Unit will conduct an investigation, and the Facility Captain will complete a threat assessment.

CSP-LAC in Lancaster serves as a Reception Center for short-term housing and classification of adult male offenders, and provides long-term housing for male inmates classified as minimum- , medium- and maximum-security. CSP-LAC opened in 1993, houses more than 4,600 inmates and employs more than 1,800 people.

For Immediate Release
Contact: Michael Stratman (661) 729-6912

Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Longest-Serving Volunteer for CDCR Retires After 50 Years

Prison Industry Board member Leonard Greenstone retired at a special meeting of the Prison Industry Board in the State Capitol on June 17.

Secretary Cate, who serves as the chairman of the Prison Industry Board said, “We note that Presidents Nixon and Clinton have commended Mr. Greenstone, as well as Governors Reagan, Brown, Deukmejian, Wilson, Davis, Schwarzenegger, and Brown again. All recognized that inmate lives were changed through your contributions. I want to personally thank you for the work you’ve done on this board.”

Greenstone founded the Leonard Greenstone Marine Technology Training Institute at the Chino Institution for Men in 1970, and personally donated equipment to get the program running. Today, graduates of that diving and welding program have a recidivism rate of only 3 percent.

In 1961, Greenstone started investing his time and resources in developing work programs for rehabilitating inmates as a volunteer with the Increased Correctional Effectiveness Program (ICE) at San Quentin State Prison. The programs he went on to establish are now emulated across the nation.

Giovanni Ramirez at Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility

This is to confirm that Giovanni Ramirez arrived at the Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility in San Diego, California on 6/24/11 @ approx. 1235 hours.

Ramirez is expected to serve 10 months at RJ Donovan and is ineligible for reduction of that time.

The parole revocation hearing for Giovanni Ramirez was held on June 20, 2011 at the Los Angeles County Men's Central Jail. At that hearing, Board of Parole Hearings Deputy Commissioner Ali Zarrinnam amended the proposed violation from 'possession of a firearm by a felon' to 'access to a weapon by a felon.' The commissioner found good cause on the amended violation.

Media note only: Some media members have requested the new prison photo of Inmate Ramirez. Please note that in compliance with a request from the LAPD investigators working on the ongoing investigation into the Brian Stow beating case, CDCR will not release the photo. LAPD is concerned that the release of the photo could be detrimental to their investigation or taint potential witnesses or a potential jury pool.

Friday, June 24, 2011

Vietnam Memorial Displayed at Correctional Training Facility

Traveling Vietnam Memorial Visits a Prison for First Time Ever

SOLEDAD – “The Wall That Heals,” a replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., will be on public display at Correctional Training Facility (CTF) until Monday morning. The traveling memorial offers a chance to honor and remember those military veterans who died fighting for their country. The memorial, now available for the public to view, had been on display inside the institution for inmate viewing. It marked the first time the memorial has ever been inside a prison or in Monterey County.

"It’s an honor to host such a prestigious memorial here at CTF,” Warden Randy Grounds said. “Inmate veterans were instrumental in bringing ‘The Wall That Heals’ to CTF. Inmates, both those who have served in the military and those who did not, benefitted from the memorial by recognizing the contributions veterans have made for their country. Our hope is that their reflections on the silent testimony of the names inscribed on the Vietnam Memorial Wall will cause them to begin to change their lifestyles for the better.”

The memorial was brought to CTF after a three-year effort by two combat veteran inmates who founded and operate the Veterans Services Office (VSO). Since the VSO started in 2005, it has assisted in the recovery of approximately $5 million in disability compensation to inmates for injuries received during military service. More than $4 million was earned compensation available to the eligible dependents of those veterans. Of the more than 215 veterans paroled with VSO assistance, only two are known to have returned with parole violations. As of April 2011 there were 3,913 veterans in the state prison system.

On June 22, CTF hosted a ceremony for “The Wall That Heals” inside the institution to acknowledge veteran inmates and recognize the efforts of the VSO. A second ceremony will be held on June 25 at 10 a.m. in the prison’s parking lot and is open to the public. This ceremony will provide the public an opportunity to honor those lost at war and recognized the efforts of the VSO. The memorial will be on 24/7 public display from 10 a.m. Saturday, June 25 through 9 a.m., Monday, June 27.

CTF opened in 1946 as a camp administered by San Quentin State Prison before becoming its own prison by 1947. In 1951 Central Facility was opened and in 1958 North Facility opened. CTF has three facilities that operate independently of each other and securely house minimum- and medium-security inmates. CTF also offers numerous self-help and vocational programs to the inmate population.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JUNE 24, 2011
CONTACT: LT. DARREN CHAMBERLAIN, (831) 678-5952
AMANDA LASH, (916) 445-4950





Monday, June 20, 2011

Giovanni Ramirez Parole Revoked for “Access to a Weapon”

The parole revocation hearing for Giovanni Ramirez was held this morning at the Los Angeles County Men’s Central Jail.

Deputy Commissioner, Ali Zarrinnam representing the Board of Parole Hearings, amended the proposed violation from ‘possession of a firearm by a felon’ to ‘access to a weapon by a felon.’ He found good cause on the violation of access to a weapon by a felon.

Ramirez will serve 10 months and is ineligible for reduction of that time.

The revocation hearing on June 20, 2011 dealt only with the weapons charge.

A second charge of ‘assault against Brian Stow’ was dismissed in the initial hearing –without prejudice- due to the lack of the evidence presented on that charge. The dismissal was not intended to express an opinion or adjudication on a potential case against Ramirez in the Stow beating case in any way as only minimal evidence was presented to the board commissioners on that charge.

For your convenience, below are links to the summary document from the previous hearing that was held on May 27, 2011, Ramirez’s parole photo, and the CDCR ‘inmate check’ which describes his commitment history. All were released previously.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, June 20, 2011
Contact: Luis Patino
(916) 445-4950

Saturday, June 18, 2011

Hundreds of Children Visit Dads in Prison for Father’s Day

'Get On The Bus’ events expand to 6 prisons

SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) and the Center for Restorative Justice Works (CRJW) again brought together more than a thousand children and their incarcerated fathers to celebrate Father’s Day during the 12th annual Get On The Bus event.

“Uniting fathers with their children helps to keep the family bond that will encourage inmates to change their behavior when they are eventually released into society,” said CDCR Secretary Matthew Cate. "We continue to support the Center for Restorative Justice Works and Get On The Bus, as each year they positively affect more and more lives."

A total of more than a thousand children traveled with their caregivers in 30 buses to visit their incarcerated dads to celebrate Father’s Day. The buses visited California Men’s Colony in San Luis Obispo on June 4; Folsom State Prison on June 11; and San Quentin State Prison, California State Prison, Solano, in Vacaville and Correctional Training Facility and Salinas Valley State Prison in Soledad on June 18. The buses arrived as early as 8 a.m. to accommodate the maximum number of visitors at the institutions. For many of these children, this was the only time during the year that they will see their father.

Last month, during the 12th annual Get On The Bus Mother’s Day event, a similar number of children traveled from major cities across California to one of three female institutions. Today in California, approximately 200,000 children have an incarcerated parent. Many of those children live with relatives or in foster care.

“These children are the hidden victims who are suffering in these stressful economic times when families do not have the extra funds to visit,” said program founder Sister Suzanne Jabro, who has spearheaded the event for the past 12 years. "We have a responsibility to bring these families together,” she added. “A child needs to see their reflection in a father’s eyes.”

Get On The Bus provides travel bags for the children, comfort care bags for the caregivers, a photograph of each child with his or her parent, and meals for the day. On the trip home, each child receives a teddy bear with a letter from his or her parent as well as post-event counseling. The program is funded by donations from churches, schools, family foundations and other organizations. Transportation is provided by Silverado Stages Inc.

For more information on the program, please visit CDCR’s web site at www.cdcr.ca.gov or the Get On The Bus program web site at www.getonthebus.us/.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Saturday, June 18, 2011

Contact: Terry Thornton (916) 445-4950
Hilary Carson, GOTB, (818) 980-7714 X 12


Friday, June 17, 2011

Juvenile Offenders Receive High School Diplomas, GEDs

103-Year-Old Namesake of Johanna Boss High School Attends 

SACRAMENTO -- Thirty-two youth from the O.H. Close Youth Correctional Facility in Stockton today received a high school diploma or GED in a significant step toward their rehabilitation. Another 52 youth graduated from the adjoining N.A.Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility one week ago.

Ms. Boss, a resident of Ripon, taught math at the school from its opening in 1965 until her retirement in the early 1970s. She continued as a substitute teacher and volunteer mentor until 2001, capping nearly 40 years of involvement with the school, which was named in her honor in 1997. At the age of 93, she was named the oldest active teacher in the nation before her final retirement.

“A high school education is critical for youthful offenders to build successful lives as they prepare to return to their communities,” said Rachel Rios, Director of Juvenile Justice. “An education opens doors for our youth to have more opportunities to turn their lives around and become productive members of society,” said Rios. “Those opportunities reduce recidivism, which improves public safety.”

The graduation also was an opportunity for the youth to share their success with family members, many of whom attended the ceremony, reflecting the importance of family involvement in the state’s juvenile justice programs.

The Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) operates a network of high schools that meet California curriculum standards, ensuring that youth receive the same education they would receive in their communities, including special education. Those standards require youth to be in classrooms for the state-mandated 240 minutes a day, 210 days a year. The schools also are accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.

The educational needs of each youth are assessed when they are committed to the DJJ. Youth are enrolled in a curriculum to receive a high school diploma, or a GED for those who are not expected to remain at DJJ long enough to earn a diploma, ensuring that every youth receives a high school education before being discharged.

Since March 2005, when DJJ adopted a remedial plan for education, approximately 5,716 youth have achieved some level of academic performance, from a high school diploma or GED, to enrollment in vocational or continuing education classes. That represents a 300 percent increase over previous years, despite a significant decline in the number of youth committed to the DJJ by the courts.

In addition, approximately 50 percent of eligible youth have enrolled in college classes, taking advantage of long-distance classes offered by Coastline College.

More information regarding DJJ programs is available at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Juvenile_Justice/index.html


 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 17, 2011
Contact: Bill Sessa
(916) 205-9193
(916) 262-1448

Thursday, June 16, 2011

North Kern State Prison Escapee Apprehended

On June 14, 2011, at approximately 9:15 p.m., North Kern State Prison (NKSP) Staff discovered Inmate Ricky Lynn Wallis missing from the Minimum Support Facility portion of the prison. Prison staff implemented escapee apprehension procedures at 9:30 p.m.

On June 15, 2011, at approximately 1:20 p.m., North Kern State Prison’s Investigative Service Unit along with the California Department of Corrections’ Office of Correctional Safety apprehended Inmate Wallis at a residence in Earlimart, California.

The NKSP Investigative Services Unit took Inmate Wallis into custody and returned to the institution where he was positively identified and placed into the Administrative Segregation Unit.

Requests for further information should be directed to Lieutenant Patrice Davis, Public Information Officer, North Kern State Prison, at (661) 721-2345 extension 5006 or (661) 203-2283.

For Immediate Release
June 16, 2011

3rd Incapacitated Inmate Granted Medical Parole Under New Law

This afternoon the Board of Parole Hearings granted medical parole to inmate Juan Garcia Sandoval (D-19576). (Thurs. June 16, 2011)

Sandoval was referred to the Board because he met the criteria of Penal Code section 3550, subdivision (a). The Board determined today at a hearing at North Kern State Prison, that the conditions under which Sandoval would be released on medical parole would not reasonably pose a threat to public safety.

Sandoval was convicted of Murder in the first degree and sentenced to 27 years in prison. The law creating medical parole prohibits inmates convicted to “life in prison without the possibility of parole,” or those condemned to death from eligibility for medical parole.

The board has up to 120 days, if necessary, to review his case. However, the board plans an expedited review of the decision in light of the uniqueness of the medical parole hearing process. During that time period, the board could uphold, modify, rescind or reverse their decision. If the board upholds that decision, they could order his parole and order the transfer of the custody of his care at an appropriate time within the 120 days.

Due to privacy laws regarding medical information, CDCR cannot comment on inmate Sandoval’s medical condition. Additionally, because there was no authorization for release of medical information, the board was instructed to discuss Sandoval’s Medical condition in private.

The board hearing transcript will serve as the official record and it will not include a discussion of his medical condition by BPH panel members. Discussion of his medical condition by other principals at the hearing, however, may be included in the transcript. The transcript is expected to be transcribed and ready in approx. 30 days.

If you have further questions, please contact Luis Patino or the Office of the Receiver for Prison Health Care.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 16, 2011
Contact: Luis Patino
(916) 445-4950

2nd Incapacitated Inmate Granted Medical Parole Under New Law

The Board of Parole Hearings has granted Medical Parole to inmate John Swesey CDCR# F53834 this morning. ( Thurs. June 16, 2011)

The Board, meeting at Wasco State Prison, determined that the conditions under which Swesey would be released would not reasonably pose a threat to public safety.

The board has up to 120 days, if necessary, to review his case. However, the board plans an expedited review of the decision in light of the uniqueness of the medical parole hearing process. During that time period, the board could uphold, modify, rescind or reverse their decision. If the board upholds that decision, they could order his parole and order the transfer of the custody of his care at an appropriate time within the 120 days.

Due to privacy laws regarding medical information, CDCR cannot comment on inmate Swesey’s medical condition. Additionally, because there was no authorization for release of medical information, the board was instructed to discuss Swesey’s Medical condition in private.

The board hearing transcript will serve as the official record and it will not include a discussion of his medical condition by BPH panel members. Discussion of his medical condition by other principals at the hearing, however, may be included in the transcript. The transcript is expected to be transcribed and ready in approx. 30 days.

If you have further questions, please contact Luis Patino or the Office of the Receiver for Prison Health Care.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 16, 2011
Contact: Luis Patino
(916) 445-4950

Phillip and Nancy Garrido Now in CDCR Custody

SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) now have custody of Phillip and Nancy Garrido, who were sentenced on June 2, 2011 in El Dorado County for the kidnapping and rape of Jaycee Lee Dugard and holding her captive for 18 years.

On June 15, Nancy Garrido was received at Central California Women’s Facility (CCWF) in Chowchilla to begin serving a 36-years-to-life sentence. She is currently single-celled in the prison’s Reception Center, where she will be processed and her long-term housing needs will be determined.
On June 16, Phillip Garrido was received at California State Prison-Corcoran (COR) in Kings County to begin serving a 431-years-to-life sentence for numerous kidnapping and sexual assault charges. Garrido is currently in a segregated cell while he is being processed, but he is expected to be housed in the Protective Housing Unit at COR. The unit houses inmates whose safety would be endangered by general population placement.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 16, 2011
Contact: Terry Thornton (916) 445-4950

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

1st Incapacitated Inmate Granted Medical Parole Under New Law

The Board of Parole Hearings granted the first Medical Parole to inmate Craig Lemke F98203 on Wed. June 15, 2011.

The board found that due to his greatly impaired medical condition, he was deemed ‘not to be a public safety risk.’

The board has up to 120 days, if necessary, to review his case. However, the board plans an expedited review of the decision in light on uniqueness of med parole hearing. During that time period, the board could uphold, modify, rescind or reverse their decision. If the board upholds that decision, they could his parole and order the transfer of the custody of his care at an appropriate point within the 120 days.

Due to privacy laws regarding medical information, CDCR cannot comment on inmate Lemke’s medical condition.

However, the board hearing transcript will serve as the official record and may include a discussion of his medical condition. The transcript is expected to be transcribed and ready by July 15, 2011.

 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 15, 2011
Contact: Luis Patino
(916) 445-4950

INMATE ESCAPE AT NORTH KERN STATE PRISON

An inmate housed at North Kern State Prison has been reported missing.

Staff discovered inmate Ricky Lynn Wallis missing from the Minimum Support Facility portion of the prison at 9:15 p.m. on June 14, 2011. Prison staff implemented escape procedures at 9:30 p.m.

Wallis is a 52 year old white male, 5’11” tall and weighing 150 pounds. Wallis has an average build with hazel eyes, a moustache,¬ and short grey/blond hair. Wallis may have recently shaved his hair. Wallis was committed from Tulare County and was serving a 3 year term for the purchase of a stolen vehicle. Wallis arrived at North Kern State Prison on July 22, 2010, and was housed within the Minimum Support Facility portion of the prison in a 200-man dormitory. Wallis was due to parole November 2011.

North Kern State Prison staff are working closely with local law enforcement agencies on the matter.

North Kern State Prison is located in Delano, California, opened in April 1993 and has a population of approximately 5,300 inmates. The prison has a Reception Center, a General Population Medium Custody Facility, and a Minimum Support Facility. The Reception Center processes incoming inmates from various county jails and determines the inmate's custody classification and prison placement.

Requests for further information should be directed to Lieutenant Patrice Davis, Public Information Officer, North Kern State Prison, at (661) 721-2345 extension 5006 or (661) 203-2283.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Wednesday, June 15, 2011
Contact Person: Patrice Davis
Telephone: (661) 721-2345 ext. 5006

Contractor Selected for Phase 2 of Stockton Health Care Facility

STOCKTON – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) and California Prison Health Care Services (CPHCS) today announced the selection of the joint venture of Clark Construction Group, LLC and McCarthy Building Companies, Inc. in association with HDR architects to build the second phase of the California Health Care Facility (CHCF) Stockton.

Clark/McCarthy will be responsible for construction of housing for 1,722 patient-inmates, a diagnostics and treatment center, program spaces, and administrative support buildings. The contract is valued at approximately $512 million.

Mike Meredith, CDCR project director, said there was significant competition for the contract. “We had several competent firms compete for this contract. We are pleased to welcome the Clark/McCarthy team to the project.”

The facility is an intermediate-level medical and mental health care facility for patient-inmates within the California state prison system. The total project is approximately 1.2 million square-feet. The first phase of construction, including on- and off-site utilities, road work, grading, secure perimeter fencing, and a central utilities plant was previously awarded to a joint venture of Granite and Hensel Phelps construction companies.

CHCF Stockton will result in a significant positive impact for the Stockton/San Joaquin community, creating more than $1 billion in economic activity associated with construction, and adding approximately 2,400 permanent jobs once the facility is complete.

Construction is anticipated to last approximately two years.

For information on CDCR please see http://www.cdcr.ca.gov

For information on CPHCS, please see http://www.cphcs.ca.gov

For additional information on the construction project, please see http://www.chcfstockton.com/.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Contact:
Terry Thornton, CDCR, (916) 445-4950
Nancy Kincaid, CPHCS, (916) 445-0496

Monday, June 13, 2011

CDCR To Close Southern California Facility for Juvenile Offenders

Will Ultimately Save State an Estimated $44 Million a Year

SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today announced that it will close one of two facilities for juvenile offenders in Southern California by early next year.

The Southern Youth Reception Center and Clinic in Norwalk (Los Angeles County) is scheduled to close by January 2012 to reduce costs and improve the fiscal efficiency of the Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ).

“In these tight fiscal times, we must take every step possible to operate in a cost-effective manner and make every tax dollar count,” said CDCR Secretary Matthew Cate, who noted that the closure is possible because the youthful offender population is expected to remain steady or decline in the coming years.

Opened in 1954, the Southern Youth Correctional Reception Center and Clinic currently houses 209 male juveniles. DJJ staff will take all necessary steps to ensure youths are transitioned appropriately to other DJJ facilities in Camarillo, Ventura County, and Stockton, San Joaquin County. Living units will be added at the Camarillo facility.

The closure is estimated to reduce overall costs by $17 million by mid-2012 and $44 million in the following fiscal year. Recent staffing reductions and DJJ’s reduced responsibility for supervising youth on parole are expected to save an additional $14.2 million in the 2012-13 fiscal year.

The Norwalk facility will be the third DJJ facility closed in the past 24 months. DJJ will continue the cost effectiveness of operating two facilities in Northern California. The O.H.Close and N.A. Chaderjian youth correctional facilties are side-by-side in one complex and managed by one administrative team.

In recent years, DJJ has seen a declining number of youthful offenders committed to state facilities. At its peak in 1996, the DJJ population was approximately 10,000 youth committed for a wide range of offenses. Financial incentives to counties, based on the belief that most juvenile offenders benefit from being housed closer to their families and communities, increased the number of offenders housed locally. Subsequently, legislation (Senate Bill 81) adopted in 2007 reserved DJJ’s population to only those youths committed for the most serious and violent crimes. As a result of these changes, DJJ’s current population is about 1,200, or less than 1 percent of all youthful offender arrests in California each year. That population is not projected to increase significantly.

Also, beginning in January 2011, county probation departments gradually began to assume responsibility for supervising youth released to parole, a move that is expected to further reduce DJJ’s population over the next three years.

DJJ also will retain youths who have exceptional treatment needs that county programs often cannot address. California also retains jurisdiction of youthful offenders to the age of 25, rather than 18 or 21.

Fast Facts:
Below is a list of DJJ facilities closed in recent years and those that will remain operating after the closure of the Southern Youth Reception Center and Clinic.

Closures:

September 2003:
Karl Holton Drug and Alcohol Abuse Treatment Center, Stockton

February 2004:
Northern Youth Correctional Reception Center and Clinic, Sacramento

May 2004:
Fred C. Nelles Youth Correctional Facility, Whittier

July 2008:
El Paso de Robles, Paso Robles
Dewitt Nelson Youth Correctional Facility, Stockton

February 2009:
Heman G. Stark Youth Correctional Facility, Chino

June 2011 (scheduled):
Preston Youth Correctional Facility, Ione

January 2012 (projected):
Southern Youth Correctional Reception Center and Clinic, Nowalk

Remaining DJJ facilities:
N.A.Chadjerian Youth Correctional Facility, Stockton
O.H. Close Youth Correctional Facility, Stockton
Ventura Youth Correctional Facility, Camarillo

DJJ-operated conservation camps:
Pine Grove Youth Conservation Camp, Pine Grove (Amador County)
S. Carraway Public Service and Fire Center, Camarillo (Ventura County)


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Bill Sessa
(916) 205-9193

Tuesday, June 7, 2011

CDCR Statement in Response to Correctional Officer Andrew Johnson’s Request

"The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation embraces the diversity of the people of California. CDCR understands its responsibility to ensure that its officers and staff treat all Californians equally and encourages cultural awareness of the many facets of our state’s society.

CDCR did not intend to offend any segment of the population with its recent refusal to allow a correctional officer from participating in a Gay Pride Parade while wearing the department’s official uniform. The decision was made solely on an interpretation of an admittedly ambiguous section of the Department Operation Manual (DOM) as it relates to unauthorized use of the CDCR uniform.

Upon review, CDCR acknowledges that the DOM is outdated and requires careful revision. Therefore, Correctional Officer Andrew Johnson will be allowed to wear the CDCR uniform in the upcoming Gay Pride Parade in Los Angeles on June 12, 2011. CDCR apologizes to Officer Johnson and any Californian who may have been offended by the original decision.

It must also be noted that while CDCR is evaluating the ambiguity of its regulations, and permitting the officer to participate in this particular event, it is not CDCR’s intent to permit staff to wear the official uniform for individual off-duty events. CDCR will clarify this policy in the regulatory process.”

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 7, 2011
Contact: Felix Figueroa
(909) 606-4921

State Responds to Three-Judge Court's Order Requiring a Reduction in Prison Crowding

Calls on Legislature to Protect Public Safety by Funding Realignment

SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today submitted a report to the federal Three-Judge Court updating it on prison crowding reduction measures that the state has taken, or plans to take, in response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on May 23, 2011. This decision requires California to reduce inmate crowding within its 33 adult institutions to 137.5 percent of design capacity within two years, or by May 24, 2013.
“California has already reduced its prison population significantly over the past several years. Today, we have the lowest crowding levels in California’s prisons since 1995,” said CDCR Secretary Matthew Cate. “Our goal is to meet the Court’s order by continuing to reduce prison crowding while still holding offenders accountable.
“Our current reduction plan does not include the early release of inmates. But it is absolutely critical that the Legislature understand the seriousness of the Supreme Court’s decision and support a variety of measures that will allow us to lower our inmate population in the safest possible way,” Cate added. “AB 109 is the cornerstone of the solution, and the Legislature must act to protect public safety by funding Realignment.”
On May 23, 2011, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Three-Judge Court’s determination that medical and mental health care for inmates falls below a constitutional level of care and that the only way to meet the requirements is by reducing prison crowding. Complying with the Court’s decision will require implementing and funding of Realignment, as well as new prison construction, to achieve the 137.5 percent goal set by the Court.
Crowding Reduction Deadlines
Today, the number of inmates in the state’s 33 prisons is approximately 143,000 inmates—a reduction of about 19,000 inmates since plaintiffs filed their motions to convene the Three-Judge Court on November 13, 2006. At that time, California’s prisons were at 202 percent of design capacity. Today, the state’s 33 prisons operate at approximately 179 percent of design capacity. California’s 33 prisons were designed to hold 79,858 inmates.
According to the Supreme Court’s decision, effective May 24, 2011, the inmate population statewide in California’s 33 adult prisons must be no more than:
• 167 percent of design capacity by November 28, 2011,

• 155 percent of design capacity by May 24, 2012,

• 147 percent of design capacity by November 26, 2012,

• 137.5 percent of design capacity by May 24, 2013.

Today’s filing outlines the following measures to reduce prison crowding:

Realignment – The Cornerstone of California’s Solution

On April 4, 2011, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. signed Assembly Bill 109, historic legislation that will enable California to close the revolving door of low-level inmates cycling in and out of prison.

Under Realignment, the state will continue to incarcerate offenders who commit serious, violent, or sexual crimes and counties will supervise, rehabilitate and manage low-level offenders using a variety of tools. It is anticipated that realignment will reduce the prison population by tens of thousands of low-level offenders over the next three years.

As Governor Brown said in his AB 109 signing message, Realignment cannot and will not be implemented without necessary funding. The Governor also signed Assembly Bill 111, which gives counties additional flexibility to access funding to increase local jail capacity for the purpose of implementing Realignment.

Realignment is supported by law enforcement including the California Police Chiefs Association, Peace Officers Research Association of California, California Peace Officers’ Association, California State Sheriffs’ Association, Chief Probation Officers of California, Association for Los Angeles County Deputy Sheriffs and Los Angeles County Deputy Probation Officers Union and Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca.

Legislative Reforms

Legislative reforms already implemented include the passage of Senate Bill (SB) x3 18, which, in part, established the California Community Corrections Performance Incentives Act, created credit-earning enhancements for inmates who complete certain rehabilitation programs, and reformed parole supervision by creating a Non-Revocable Parole category for low-level, lower-risk offenders.

CDCR also transferred about 10,000 inmates to out-of-state facilities. This program would continue as operationally needed. Since 2009, the department has also discharged more than 27,000 parolees who were deported to foreign countries by the federal government.


Increasing Capacity

CDCR has made efforts to increase prison capacity through Assembly Bill 900, passed in a bipartisan vote of the Legislature and signed into law on May 3, 2007. The department has increased design capacity by adding beds as well as treatment space.

Under AB 900, the state is currently planning, designing or constructing:

• A new 1.2 million-square-foot health-care facility in Stockton.

• New high-security prison facilities to be built on existing prison sites.

• New mental health facilities at the California Medical Facility and the California Institution for Women.

• Conversions of former juvenile facilities to adult facilities.

• New re-entry facilities.

In addition to projects that will add design capacity, under AB 900, the state has completed and is planning upgrades that add health care treatment and clinical space.

The full report filed with the Three-Judge Court, as well as other information regarding population reduction measures, is available on CDCR’s web site at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JUNE 7, 2011
CONTACT: OSCAR HIDALGO (916) 445-4950