Thursday, September 29, 2011

CDCR Releases Information on Inmate Initiated Hunger Strike

Hunger strikers could face disciplinary action under state law

SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) is responding to a hunger strike disturbance by thousands of inmates in several correctional facilities. As of today, 4,252 inmates in eight state prisons have missed nine consecutive meals since Monday, September 26, 2011.

The following facilities have reported inmate participation:

• Calipatria State Prison

• Centinela State Prison

• California State Prison-Corcoran

• Ironwood State Prison

• Pelican Bay State Prison

• California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison in Corcoran

• San Quentin State Prison

• Salinas Valley State Prison

On September 28, CDCR informed hunger strike participants that the department will not condone organized inmate disturbances. Participation in mass hunger strikes and other disturbances will result in CDCR taking the following action:

• Participation in a mass disturbance is a violation of state law, and any participating inmates will receive disciplinary action in accordance with the California Code of Regulations; and

• Inmates identified as leading the disturbance will be subject to removal from the general population and be placed in an Administrative Segregation Unit.

CDCR may need to take additional measures to effectively monitor and manage hunger strikers and their nutritional intake. This could include the possible removal of canteen items from the cells of participating inmates. CDCR is continuing to offer state-issued meals to all inmates.

CDCR will take every effort to maintain normal program operations for non-participating inmates; however, a large-scale disturbance has the potential to impact programs, operations, staffing, safety and security. If normal programming is affected, CDCR will notify inmates and their families.

In May 2011, CDCR began conducting a thorough evaluation of its gang validation and Security Housing Unit (SHU) confinement policies and procedures. CDCR has already received input from other state correctional departments, the federal correctional system, consultants, experts, and internal and external stakeholders. A draft policy is under review and includes behavior-based components, increased privileges for SHU inmates who remain disciplinary free, a step-down process for SHU inmates, and a better defined validation process.

In addition, CDCR has authorized offering watch caps, sweat pants, hobby craft items and wall calendars for purchase; provided exercise equipment in SHU yards; authorized annual photographs for disciplinary-free SHU inmates; approved use of proctors for college examinations; and audited food-service operations at Pelican Bay State Prison.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
SEPTEMBER 29, 2011
CONTACT: TERRY THORNTON
(916) 445-4950

Monday, September 26, 2011

Incapacitated Inmate Granted Medical Parole

CORCORAN – The California Board of Parole Hearings (BPH) on September 23, 2011 granted medical parole to inmate Kenneth Bryan Holcomb. Inmate Holcomb was referred to the Board because he met the criteria of Penal Code Section 3550. The Board determined at a hearing Friday at California State Prison, Corcoran, that the conditions under which inmate Holcomb would be released on medical parole would not reasonably pose a threat to public safety.

Inmate Holcomb is serving a 22-years-to-life sentence for second-degree murder, with an 8-year sentence for a firearm enhancement. He was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on September 25, 1992 from San Mateo County.

Due to privacy laws regarding medical information, CDCR cannot comment on inmate Holcomb’s medical condition. The Board hearing transcript will serve as the official record. The transcript is expected to be transcribed and ready in approximately 30 days.

PC Section 3550, Medical Parole, became effective on January 1, 2011. The intent of the medical parole program is to allow inmates, who are permanently medically incapacitated and require 24-hour care, to be released to community medical care, if they do not require custody supervision or pose a risk to public safety. The law prohibits inmates convicted to life in prison without the possibility of parole, or those condemned to death from eligibility for medical parole. The Board of Parole Hearings reviews cases referred by institution medical staff and determines who is suitable for release.

For more information, please refer to the Board of Parole Hearings website: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/BOPH/index.html

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
SEPTEMBER 26, 2011
CONTACT: PAUL VERKE
(916) 445-4950

Friday, September 23, 2011

Incapacitated Inmate Granted Medical Parole

SAN QUENTIN– The California Board of Parole Hearings (BPH) granted medical parole today to inmate Nestor Gallegos Zepeda. Inmate Zepeda was referred to the Board because he met the criteria of Penal Code Section 3550. The Board determined at a hearing today at San Quentin State Prison that the conditions under which inmate Zepeda would be released on medical parole would not reasonably pose a threat to public safety.

Inmate Zepeda is serving a 13-year sentence for assault with a deadly weapon, a 2-year 8-month sentence for failure to register a specific sex offense, and an 8-year sentence for two counts of lewd and lascivious acts with a child under 14. He was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on June 19, 2008 from Los Angeles County.

Due to privacy laws regarding medical information, CDCR cannot comment on inmate Zepeda’s medical condition. The Board hearing transcript will serve as the official record. The transcript is expected to be transcribed and ready in approximately 30 days.

PC Section 3550, Medical Parole, became effective on January 1, 2011. The intent of the medical parole program is to allow inmates, who are permanently medically incapacitated and require 24-hour care, to be released to community medical care, if they do not require custody supervision or pose a risk to public safety. The law prohibits inmates convicted to life in prison without the possibility of parole, or those condemned to death from eligibility for medical parole. The Board of Parole Hearings reviews cases referred by institution medical staff and determines who is suitable for release.

For more information, please refer to the Board of Parole Hearings website: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/BOPH/index.html
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 23, 2011
CONTACT: Paul Verke
(916) 445-4950

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Incapacitated Inmate Granted Medical Parole

CORCORAN – The California Board of Parole Hearings (BPH) granted medical parole today to inmate Robert William Kimble. Inmate Kimble was referred to the Board because he met the criteria of Penal Code Section 3550. The Board determined at a hearing today at California State Prison, Corcoran, that the conditions under which inmate Kimble would be released on medical parole would not reasonably pose a threat to public safety.

Inmate Kimble is serving a 37-years-to-life sentence for first-degree murder with the use of a firearm, attempted first-degree murder with great bodily harm, assault and two counts of assault with a deadly weapon with the use of a firearm. He was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on February 7, 1983 from Los Angeles County.

Due to privacy laws regarding medical information, CDCR cannot comment on inmate Kimble’s medical condition.

The Board hearing transcript will serve as the official record and it will not include a discussion of his medical condition by BPH panel members. Discussion of his medical condition by other principals at the hearing, however, may be included in the transcript. The transcript is expected to be transcribed and ready in approximately 30 days.

PC Section 3550, Medical Parole, became effective on January 1, 2011. The intent of the medical parole program is to allow inmates, who are permanently medically incapacitated and require 24-hour care, to be released to community medical care, if they do not require custody supervision or pose a risk to public safety. The law prohibits inmates convicted to life in prison without the possibility of parole, or those condemned to death from eligibility for medical parole. The Board of Parole Hearings reviews cases referred by institution medical staff and determines who is suitable for release.

For more information, please refer to the Board of Parole Hearings website: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/BOPH/index.html

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
SEPTEMBER 21, 2011
CONTACT: PAUL VERKE
(916) 445-4950

Friday, September 16, 2011

Incapacitated Inmate Granted Medical Parole

VACAVILLE – The California Board of Parole Hearings (BPH) yesterday granted medical parole to inmate Michael Joseph Tungate. Inmate Tungate was referred to the Board because he met the criteria of Penal Code Section 3550. The Board determined at a hearing at California Medical Facility in Vacaville that the conditions under which inmate Tungate would be released on medical parole would not reasonably pose a threat to public safety.

Inmate Tungate is serving a 20-year sentence for assault with a deadly weapon and shooting at an inhabited dwelling. He was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on March 27, 2003 from Siskiyou County.

Due to privacy laws regarding medical information, CDCR cannot comment on inmate Tungate’s medical condition.

The Board hearing transcript will serve as the official record. The transcript is expected to be transcribed and ready in approximately 30 days.

PC Section 3550, Medical Parole, became effective on January 1, 2011. The intent of the medical parole program is to allow inmates, who are permanently medically incapacitated and require 24-hour care, to be released to community medical care, if they do not require custody supervision or pose a risk to public safety. The law prohibits inmates convicted to life in prison without the possibility of parole, or those condemned to death from eligibility for medical parole. The Board of Parole Hearings reviews cases referred by institution medical staff and determines who is suitable for release.

For more information, please refer to the Board of Parole Hearings website: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/BOPH/index.html

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, September 16, 2011
Contact: Paul Verke
(916) 445-4950

Incapacitated Inmate Granted Medical Parole

VACAVILLE – The California Board of Parole Hearings (BPH) on September 15, 2011 granted medical parole to inmate Alex Navarro. Inmate Navarro was referred to the Board because he met the criteria of Penal Code Section 3550. The Board determined at a hearing at California Medical Facility in Vacaville that the conditions under which inmate Navarro would be released on medical parole would not reasonably pose a threat to public safety.

Inmate Navarro is serving an 11-years, 8-month sentence for two counts of first-degree burglary. He was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on June 19, 2006 from San Diego County.

Due to privacy laws regarding medical information, CDCR cannot comment on inmate Navarro’s medical condition.

The Board hearing transcript will serve as the official record and it will not include a discussion of his medical condition by BPH panel members. Discussion of his medical condition by other principals at the hearing, however, may be included in the transcript. The transcript is expected to be transcribed and ready in approximately 30 days.

PC Section 3550, Medical Parole, became effective on January 1, 2011. The intent of the medical parole program is to allow inmates, who are permanently medically incapacitated and require 24-hour care, to be released to community medical care, if they do not require custody supervision or pose a risk to public safety. The law prohibits inmates convicted to life in prison without the possibility of parole, or those condemned to death from eligibility for medical parole. The Board of Parole Hearings reviews cases referred by institution medical staff and determines who is suitable for release.

For more information, please refer to the Board of Parole Hearings website:
http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/BOPH/index.html

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, September 16, 2011
Contact: Paul Verke
(916) 445-4950



Thursday, September 15, 2011

Incapacitated Inmate Granted Medical Parole

VACAVILLE – The California Board of Parole Hearings (BPH) today granted medical parole to inmate Ramon Llanez Garcia. Inmate Garcia was referred to the Board because he met the criteria of Penal Code Section 3550. The Board determined today at a hearing at California Medical Facility in Vacaville that the conditions under which inmate Garcia would be released on medical parole would not reasonably pose a threat to public safety.
Inmate Garcia is serving a 17-years-to-life sentence for second-degree murder. He was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on February 23, 1988 from Kings County.

Due to privacy laws regarding medical information, CDCR cannot comment on inmate Garcia’s medical condition.

The Board hearing transcript will serve as the official record and it will not include a discussion of his medical condition by BPH panel members. Discussion of his medical condition by other principals at the hearing, however, may be included in the transcript. The transcript is expected to be transcribed and ready in approximately 30 days.

PC Section 3550, Medical Parole, became effective on January 1, 2011. The intent of the medical parole program is to allow inmates, who are permanently medically incapacitated and require 24-hour care, to be released to community medical care, if they do not require custody supervision or pose a risk to public safety. The law prohibits inmates convicted to life in prison without the possibility of parole, or those condemned to death from eligibility for medical parole. The Board of Parole Hearings reviews cases referred by institution medical staff and determines who is suitable for release.

For more information, please refer to the Board of Parole Hearings website:
http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/BOPH/index.html

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, September 15, 2011
Contact: Paul Verke
(916) 445-4950

Incapacitated Inmate Denied Medical Parole

VACAVILLE -- The California Board of Parole Hearings (BPH) denied medical parole today to inmate Arnold Kenneth Brown. Inmate Brown was referred to the Board because he met the criteria of Penal Code Section 3550. The Board determined at a hearing today at California Medical Facility in Vacaville, that the conditions under which inmate Brown would be released on medical parole could reasonably pose a threat to public safety.
Inmate Brown is serving a 30-years-to-life sentence for first-degree murder and assault with a deadly weapon. He was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on October 27,1981from San Francisco County.

Due to privacy laws regarding medical information, CDCR cannot comment on inmate Brown’s medical condition.

The Board hearing transcript will serve as the official record. The transcript is expected to be transcribed and ready in approximately 30 days.

PC Section 3550, Medical Parole, became effective January 1, 2011. The intent of the medical parole program is to allow inmates who are permanently medically incapacitated and require 24-hour care to be released to community medical care if they do not require custody supervision or pose a risk to public safety. The law prohibits inmates sentenced to “life in prison without the possibility of parole” or those condemned to death from eligibility for medical parole. The Board of Parole Hearings reviews cases referred by institution medical staff and determines who is suitable for release.

For more information, please refer to the Board of Parole Hearings website:
http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/BOPH/index.html

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, September 15, 2011
Contact: Paul Verke
(916) 445-4950

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Incapacitated Inmate Granted Medical Parole

VACAVILLE – The California Board of Parole Hearings (BPH) today granted medical parole to inmate Charles Oliver Platt. Inmate Platt was referred to the Board because he met the criteria of Penal Code Section 3550. The Board determined today at a hearing at California Medical Facility in Vacaville that the conditions under which inmate Platt would be released on medical parole would not reasonably pose a threat to public safety.
Inmate Platt is serving a 22-years-to-life sentence for second-degree murder. He was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on August 7, 1995 from Alameda County.

Due to privacy laws regarding medical information, CDCR cannot comment on inmate Platt’s medical condition.

The Board hearing transcript will serve as the official record. The transcript is expected to be transcribed and ready in approximately 30 days.

PC Section 3550, Medical Parole, became effective on January 1, 2011. The intent of the medical parole program is to allow inmates, who are permanently medically incapacitated and require 24-hour care, to be released to community medical care, if they do not require custody supervision or pose a risk to public safety. The law prohibits inmates convicted to life in prison without the possibility of parole, or those condemned to death from eligibility for medical parole. The Board of Parole Hearings reviews cases referred by institution medical staff and determines who is suitable for release.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday, September 13, 2011
Contact: Paul Verke
(916) 445-4950

Incapacitated Inmate Granted Medical Parole

VACAVILLE – The California Board of Parole Hearings (BPH) today granted medical parole to inmate Roney Rogers Nunez. Inmate Nunez was referred to the Board because he met the criteria of Penal Code Section 3550. The Board determined today at a hearing at California Medical Facility in Vacaville that the conditions under which inmate Nunez would be released on medical parole would not reasonably pose a threat to public safety.

Inmate Nunez is serving a 25-years-to-life sentence for petty theft with a prior. He was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on November 17, 1995 from Santa Clara County.

Due to privacy laws regarding medical information, CDCR cannot comment on inmate Nunez’s medical condition.

The Board hearing transcript will serve as the official record and it will not include a discussion of his medical condition by BPH panel members. Discussion of his medical condition by other principals at the hearing, however, may be included in the transcript. The transcript is expected to be transcribed and ready in approximately 30 days.

PC Section 3550, Medical Parole, became effective on January 1, 2011. The intent of the medical parole program is to allow inmates, who are permanently medically incapacitated and require 24-hour care, to be released to community medical care, if they do not require custody supervision or pose a risk to public safety. The law prohibits inmates convicted to life in prison without the possibility of parole, or those condemned to death from eligibility for medical parole. The Board of Parole Hearings reviews cases referred by institution medical staff and determines who is suitable for release.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Tuesday, September 13, 2011
Contact: Paul Verke
(916) 445-4950

Monday, September 12, 2011

CDCR Announces Community-Based Program for Eligible Inmates

Alternative Custody Program aims to reunite inmates with their families

SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today announced the implementation of the Alternative Custody Program (ACP), aimed at reuniting low-level offenders with their families and providing inmates with rehabilitative services within the community.

In September 2010, Gov. Schwarzenegger signed Senate Bill 1266 into law, creating ACP to address the high number of inmates with dependent children in the state’s prisons. The program allows non-serious, non-violent offenders, as defined by Penal Code (PC) 1192.7(c) and 667.5(c), and non-sex offenders to serve the remainder of their sentences in the community in lieu of state prison.

“Approximately two-thirds of CDCR’s female inmates are mothers whose children are either with relatives or are in foster care,” Secretary Matthew Cate said. “ACP is a step in breaking the intergenerational cycle of incarceration, as family involvement is one of the biggest indicators of an inmate’s rehabilitation.”

Initially, the program will be offered to qualifying female inmates. Participation may be offered at a later date to male inmates, at the discretion of the Secretary of CDCR.

Effective September 12, an inmate who qualifies will be permitted to serve the remainder of their sentence in a residential home, a residential substance-abuse treatment program, or a transitional-care facility that offers individualized services based on their needs.

The program permits eligible inmates to seek and retain employment in the community, attend psychological counseling sessions, educational or vocational training classes, participate in life-skills or parenting training, and utilize substance-abuse treatment services.

Approximately 45 percent of CDCR’s female inmates are potentially eligible for ACP, but approval for participation in the program is dependent on a review of individual history and case factors.

The following eligibility criteria must be met for participation:

· Female inmate, or
· Pregnant inmate, or
· Inmate who, immediately prior to incarceration, was the primary caregiver of a dependent child.
· Have 24 months or less to serve in state prison.

The following exclusionary criteria preclude an inmate from participating:

· Current or prior serious or violent felony, as defined by the Penal Code
· Current or prior sex-offense conviction or PC 290 registration requirement
· An escape in the last 10 years
· Specific in-prison misconduct or custody levels
· Active restraining order
· Specific in-prison misconduct or custody levels
· Gang membership/affiliation
· Felony, or Immigration and Customs Enforcement hold

In addition, a case-by-case eligibility determination will be made regarding:

· Current or prior sexual convictions not requiring PC 290 registration
· Current or prior child-abuse arrests or convictions in which the offense was related to abuse or neglect of a child
· Current or prior convictions for stalking

Supervision and case management will be provided by an assigned parole agent. The ACP participant will continue to serve their full sentence and will be electronically monitored for the duration of the time they are in the program. An inmate’s participation in the program may be revoked at any time and for any reason.

An ACP participant will receive sentence-reduction credits that would have been received had they served their sentence in state prison. In addition, they are eligible to receive day-for-day earned release credits if they complete an approved rehabilitative program while participating in ACP.

CDCR will notify both local law enforcement and victims, if any, of an inmate’s participation in ACP.

SB 1266 did not appropriate funding for ACP. Since the state will not be responsible for transportation, food, or housing costs for ACP participants, CDCR anticipates a cost-savings to the state of approximately $6 million next year.

When ACP was enacted into law, several non-profit and community organizations offered their programs free of charge to ACP participants. Under ACP, participants may live in approved residences, but the state is not responsible for their housing costs.

For more information on CDCR’s female inmate population, visit the Female Offender Programs and Services page here: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Adult_Operations/FOPS/index.html.

For more information on ACP, visit CDCR’s website here: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Adult_Operations/FOPS/docs/ACP-Fact-Sheet-Final.pdf

**As of September 9, 2015, CDCR is evaluating an expansion of the Alternative Custody Program to male inmates.** 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday, September 12, 2011
Contact: Dana Toyama
(916) 445-4950

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Avenal State Prison Donates 515 Cell Phones to Soldiers

Donation made in honor of ten-year September 11th anniversary

AVENAL, CA. -- In recognition of the ten-year anniversary of September 11th, Avenal State Prison (ASP) donated 515 cell phones to the Cell Phones for Soldiers program.

“The job of our troops is never-ending.” ASP Warden James Hartley said. “They remain in foreign lands as peacekeepers, guarding those who wish to realize the liberties of freedom. Our servicemen continue to be removed from their family units and limited in their abilities to maintain their family ties. As such, Avenal State Prison wants to support the troops by giving them the opportunity to hear that precious and familiar voice when they call home.”

The phones collected came from staff donations as well as those recovered during contraband searches. Approximately 450 of the donated cell phones were recovered either in drops outside the prison that were intended for inmates, or in the inmate housing units where no suspects could be tied to the cell phones.

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) has seen a rise in the use of contraband cell phones. Cell phone use by inmates poses a security risk as it circumvents the monitoring process and compromises security in prisons. So far this year, 9,935 contraband cell phones have been discovered in CDCR’s prisons and Conservation Camps.

Cell Phones for Soldiers collects cell phones, recycles them and uses the profits to purchase pre-paid calling cards for the soldiers in far away areas so that they may call home to their parents, children or spouses. The phones are sent to ReCellular, which pays Cell Phones for Soldiers for each donated phone – enough to provide an hour of talk time to soldiers abroad.

Cell Phones for Soldiers was founded in 2004 by teenagers Robbie and Brittany Bergquist from Norwell, Mass., with $21 of their own money. Since then, the registered 501c3 non-profit organization has, to date, collected 7.5 million cell phones, which they have turned into 90 million prepaid calling card minutes distributed to soldiers serving overseas.

ASP opened in January 1987, the facility covers 640 acres and is designated as a low-medium security institution to provide housing for approximately 5,700 general population inmates. The prison employs 1,629 people and provides academic classes, vocational instruction, a substance abuse program and work programs to include a Prison Industries Authority plant.



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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

SEPTEMBER 11 2011
CONTACT: ED BORLA

(559) 386-0674 EXT. 5028

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Governor Brown Joins CDCR to Honor Employees at 27th Annual Medal of Valor Ceremony

Forty-eight employees recognized for heroism, outstanding service


SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) and Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr. today honored 48 employees during the department’s annual Medal of Valor Ceremony. Employees were recognized for extraordinary bravery and conduct above and beyond the call of duty, often in lifesaving incidents where public safety was at risk.

Governor Brown had praise for the award winners and their tireless dedication to public safety.

“These men and women exemplify what it means to serve the people of California,” said Governor Brown. “On behalf of all Californians, we honor their courage, commitment and resolve.”

Awards were presented by CDCR Secretary Matthew L. Cate and senior department executives at the 27th annual ceremony, which was sponsored by the California Correctional Supervisors Organization.

“CDCR employees statewide are truly committed to protecting public safety,” said Secretary Cate. “That commitment is embodied by the employees honored today for acts of true heroism. These brave employees gave of themselves, and some even placed their own lives in jeopardy to save another.”

The awards presented ranged from the Distinguished Service Award to the prestigious Medal of Valor.

In many instances, the recipients saved the life of other employees, inmates or private citizens as they responded to emergencies. Among the actions recognized by the awards were an unselfish kidney donation that spared the life of a stranger; a quick response that saved the life of three children involved in a car accident and; decisive action by parole agents in subduing an attacker, preventing harm to juvenile offenders attending a rehabilitation classroom exercise.

Correctional Lt. Jesus S. Coronado of Calipatria State Prison was awarded the department’s Medal of Valor, the department’s highest award, bestowed upon an employee who displays “great courage in the face of immediate life-threatening peril, and with full knowledge of the risk involved.”

While driving home from work, Coronado witnessed a vehicle plunge into a canal. As the car and occupants floated toward a dangerous drop off point, Coronado entered the swift-moving water and pulled three small children and their mother from the vehicle.

The responding California Highway Patrol Officer said that had it not been for his heroic actions, the lives of the children and their mother would have been lost. Coronado placed his own personal safety at risk, exemplifying selfless service, bravery and courage, meeting the criteria for the Medal of Valor.

A complete list of 2011 award winners follows:

MEDAL OF VALOR

The Medal of Valor is CDCR’s highest award, earned by employees distinguishing themselves by conspicuous bravery or heroism above and beyond the normal demands of correctional service. The employee shall display great courage in the face of immediate life-threatening peril and with full knowledge of the risk involved. The act should show professional judgment and not jeopardize operations or the lives of others.

Correctional Officer Jesus S. Coronado, Calipatria State Prison

GOLD STAR MEDAL

The Corrections Star (Gold) medal is the department’s second-highest award for heroic deeds under extraordinary circumstances. The employee shall display courage in the face of immediate peril in acting to save the life of another person.

Correctional Officer Jose F. Marron, Correctional Training Facility

Parole Agent Margarita R. Montoya-Ortiz, Bakersfield Juvenile Parole Office

SILVER STAR MEDAL

The Corrections Star (Silver) medal is the department’s third-highest award for acts of bravery under extraordinary or unusual circumstances. The employee shall display courage in the face of potential peril while saving or attempting to save the life of another person or distinguish themselves by performing in stressful situations with exceptional tactics or judgment.

Assistant Supervising Parole Agent Lisa Aceves, Bakersfield Juvenile Parole Office

Correctional Lieutenant Jeremy W. Austin, Mule Creek State Prison

Special Agent Michael L. Brodie, Office of Correctional Safety

Correctional Officer Jason De La Torre, California State Prison, Los Angeles County

Correctional Officer Julian V. Garcia, Calipatria State Prison

Clinical Psychologist Scott Johnson, North Kern State Prison

Correctional Officer Danny A. Ramirez, California Medical Facility

Parole Agent Robert D. Story, Parole Region I

Instructor Danny Trout, Bakersfield Juvenile Parole Office

Correctional Officer Britt L. Watts, California Medical Facility

Correctional Officer Mark S. Yates, California Institution for Men

BRONZE STAR MEDAL

The Corrections Star (Bronze) is the department’s award for saving a life without placing oneself in peril. The employee shall have used proper training and tactics in a professional manner to save, or clearly contribute to saving, the life of another person

Licensed Vocational Nurse Anthony Andreola, California Correctional Institution

Correctional Officer Mannie N. Christensen, Folsom State Prison

Correctional Sergeant Wade D. Davey, Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility

Correctional Officer Thomas R. Davies, California Correctional Institution

Correctional Officer German J. Jimenez, Centinela State Prison

Correctional Lieutenant Denise M. Laguna, California Out-of-State Facilities

Correctional Sergeant Caesar V. Padua, Central California Women’s Facility

Correctional Officer Rebecca Rutledge, Sierra Conservation Center

Correctional Lieutenant Joseph Stewart, California State Prison, Sacramento

Correctional Counselor I Crystal M. Wood, California Correctional Institution

Correctional Sergeant David G. Villegas, Central California Women’s Facility

Correctional Lieutenant Michael C. Villegas, Central California Women’s Facility

DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL

The Distinguished Service Medal is for an employee’s exemplary work conduct with the department for a period of months or years, or involvement in a specific assignment of unusual benefit to the Department.

Parole Agent I Milton J. Chew, Parole Region III

Statewide K-9 Coordinator Wayne W. Conrad, California State Prison, Solano

Parole Agent I Martin V. Figueroa, Parole Region II

Correctional Officer Joseph E. Hartl, California State Prison, Sacramento

Correctional Officer Raphael Heredia, California State Prison, Sacramento

Parole Agent III George S. Horiuchi, Division of Adult Parole Operations

Automotive Technician Gary M. Martinez, California Institution for Women

Correctional Officer Myisha R. Milsap, California State Prison, Sacramento

Correctional Officer Susanne R. Neely, California State Prison, Sacramento

Correctional Officer Arti D. Parmar, California State Prison, Sacramento

Correctional Officer Thomas M. Quezada, California State Prison, Sacramento

Correctional Sergeant Le’Vance A. Quinn, California State Prison, Sacramento

Correctional Officer Simon A. Ramirez, California State Prison, Sacramento

Chief Deputy Regional Administrator Maritza J. Rodriguez, Region IV

Parole Agent I Charlotte A. Sullivan, Parole Region II

Correctional Officer Develyn J. Till, California State Prison, Sacramento

Correctional Officer Carlos E. Villasenor, California State Prison, Sacramento

Correctional Officer Eric L. Walker, California State Prison, Sacramento

Parole Agent III Ken H. Wong, Parole Region II

Correctional Officer Chris B. Wuest, California State Prison, Sacramento

CORRECTIONAL SUPERVISOR OF THE YEAR

Lieutenant Michael Patrick West, North Kern State Prison

CORRECTIONAL PEACE OFFICER OF THE YEAR

Correctional Officer Christine Boyd, High Desert State Prison

DIRECTOR’S SPECIAL RECOGNITION AWARD

Correctional Officer Luis Hernandez, Calipatria State Prison



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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
SEPTEMBER 1, 2011
CONTACT: Terry Thornton (916) 445-4950