Tuesday, April 24, 2012

CDCR Responds to Video about Realignment


Sacramento – A video released Tuesday by the California Republican Party asserts that offenders, including Aaron Suggs, are being released – or are being released early – from prison because of Public Safety Realignment. In fact, Suggs was not released early from prison, nor was his release related to Public Safety Realignment.

He was released after serving his full sentence for being in possession of a controlled substance. There is also no indication that the Sacramento County Probation Department could have done anything more to stop Suggs from choosing to commit another crime.

The California Police Chiefs Association, the California State Sheriffs’ Association and the Chief Probation Officers of California have done an excellent job of implementing Public Safety Realignment. The administration continues to fully support local law enforcement and its ability to effectively protect our communities.

The reality of Realignment is that state inmates are only released upon serving their legally required time in prison. All offenders are subject to supervision upon their release, typically in their county of last legal residence. 

Monday, April 23, 2012

Inmate Death at California Men’s Colony Under Investigation


Homicide suspect has been identified and segregated

SAN LUIS OBISPO – A California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) inmate assigned to California Men’s Colony (CMC) died of presumed injuries resulting from a one-on-one physical altercation with another inmate Saturday morning while at his work assignment in a facility dining room.

A suspect has been identified and is currently housed in the Administrative Segregation Unit.  CMC Facility C has been placed on a modified program pending further investigation.

The deceased inmate, Michael Walsh, 51, was at his assigned job in the Facility C Dining Room on April 21 when he was found by a correctional officer lying face down and unresponsive.  Walsh was transported by ambulance to a local hospital where he was pronounced dead at 9:05a.m.

Walsh was received from Kern County on June 30, 1997, with a life sentence for multiple charges including assault with a deadly weapon on a peace officer, false imprisonment, sexual assault with force, and assault with a deadly weapon.

His death is being investigated as a homicide by the CMC Investigative Services Unit and the San Luis Obispo County District Attorney’s Office. The Office of the Inspector General’s Bureau of Independent Review was also notified of the incident.

CMC is a multi-mission institution that houses more than 5,500 inmates, employs nearly 1,800 people, and includes a general acute care hospital, CAL-Fire fire camp, substance abuse treatment programs, an accredited school, and an extensive Prison Industries Authority program.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 23, 2012
Contact: Lt. Dean Spears
(805) 547-7900 ext. 7948

CDCR Releases Plan to Cut Billions in Prison Spending and Meet Federal Court Mandates


Federal health-care oversight should end by 2013

SACRAMENTO – In the wake of a declining prison population resulting from Realignment, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today released a plan to cut billions in spending, comply with multiple federal court orders for inmate medical, mental health and dental care, and significantly improve the operation of California’s prison system. The plan is titled “The Future of California Corrections: A Blueprint to Save Billions of Dollars, End Federal Oversight, and Improve the Prison System.”

“My goal is to end federal court oversight of medical, mental health and dental care by next year,” said CDCR Secretary Matthew Cate. “This plan builds on the improvements made possible by Realignment. It will go a long way towards making our correctional system more efficient and secure and, at the same time, lower our high recidivism rates.”

CDCR’s plan will:

·         Reduce CDCR’s annual budget by more than $1.5 billion upon full implementation, including $160 million dollars in savings from closing the California Rehabilitation Center;
·         Eliminate $4.1 billion in construction projects that are no longer needed because of population reductions;
·         Eliminate $2.2 billion annually that would have been spent had Realignment not been implemented;
·         Return all out-of-state inmates to California by 2016 to bring back jobs and manage offenders closer to home while saving millions in taxpayer dollars;
·         Satisfy the U.S. Supreme Court’s order to lower the state’s prison population;
·         Satisfy the federal courts that CDCR has achieved and maintained constitutional levels of medical, mental health and dental care to avoid costly oversight;
·         Incorporate a standardized staffing formula to better manage staff levels and cost;
·         Improve the classification system to provide proper inmate housing placement and reduce the reliance on costly high-security facilities.

This plan ends a long-term uptick in corrections costs. CDCR accounted for just three percent of General Fund spending 30 years ago, which increased to 11 percent in FY 2008-09. CDCR’s plan will lower it to 7.5 percent in FY 2015-16. When realignment is fully implemented, CDCR expenditures will drop by 18 percent overall.

CDCR has responded to a string of class-action lawsuits dating back to 1990 challenging the levels of medical, mental health and dental care for inmates. In 2006, federal courts appointed a federal court-appointed Receiver to bring health care up to constitutional standards. Mental health care is overseen by a Special Master and dental care is monitored by Court Experts.

“CDCR has made substantial progress in assuring the courts that it is providing Constitutionally-mandated levels of care to inmates,” said Cate. “We are committed to ending federal oversight of our prisons’ healthcare systems.”

The courts have indicated that California is making vast improvements and is on track to end the Receivership. Earlier this year, a federal judge cited “significant progress” in medical care delivery and wrote that “the end of the Receivership appears to be in sight.” The court also called for negotiations to take place on returning health care authority to CDCR.  

Similar progress is being made in other aspects of prison health care. Mental health bed waiting lists that were once hundreds of patients long have fallen sharply or been eliminated. Dental care has improved markedly as well, with 30 out of 33 prisons having passed audits of their dental program and the remainder expected to pass soon.

Many of the improvements are due to the reduction in prison overcrowding made possible by Public Safety Realignment signed into law by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. last year.

Since Public Safety Realignment took effect, CDCR’s offender population has dropped by approximately 22,000 inmates and 16,000 parolees. Overcrowding has been reduced from a high of more than 200 percent of design capacity to just 155 percent today. The thousands of makeshift beds in gymnasiums and dayrooms that CDCR had been forced to use for years are now gone.

“Realignment has given California a historic opportunity to invest in a prison system that is not just less crowded, but more efficient, while saving billions of state taxpayer dollars,” said Cate.

CDCR’s spring population projections suggest that the department may fall just short of meeting the final court-ordered crowding-reduction benchmark. In June 2013, the department’s prison population is projected to be at 141 percent of design capacity rather than the 137.5 percent goal set by the federal Three-Judge Court and affirmed by the Supreme Court. The measures proposed in this plan will allow the state to seek and obtain a modification of the order to raise the final benchmark to 145 percent of design capacity. In its order, the Supreme Court anticipated this as a possibility and said the state “will be free to move” the court for modification.
“We are confident that this plan will satisfy the court’s order,” said Cate.
To read or download a copy of the plan “The Future of California Corrections: A Blueprint to Save Billions of Dollars, End Federal Oversight, and Improve the Prison System”, go to www.cdcr.ca.gov.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 23, 2012
Contact: Jeffrey Callison
(916) 445-4950

Friday, April 20, 2012

State Inmate Mistakenly Released From County Jail Apprehended

LOS ANGELES-- The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) took inmate Larry Darnell Howard, 21, a state inmate who was mistakenly release from Los Angeles County Jail on April 17,
into custody after he was arrested by CDCR Special Service Unit agents on April 19.

Howard was apprehended at approximately 11 p.m. near his residence in Los Angeles. 

On April 20, 2012, at approximately 1 a.m. Howard was transported to California Institution for Men, pending transfer to Wasco State Prison-Reception Center to complete his Reception Center processing. 

Howard was received from Los Angeles County on January 5, 2012, to serve a two-year sentence for first-degree burglary. He was not scheduled to parole until November 2012.   

CDCR’s Special Service Unit (SSU) is charged with the apprehension of escapees. On April 15, SSU agents apprehended an inmate who had walked away from Alder Conservation Camp two days before. And on April 18, SSU agents apprehended a juvenile offender who had escaped from a Sacramento-area hospital the night before.





Of all offenders who have escaped from an adult institution, camp or community-based program since 1977, 98.7 percent have been apprehended.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 20, 2012
Contact: Henry Cervantez
(661) 758-7029

Thursday, April 19, 2012

CDCR Agents Looking for State Inmate Mistakenly Released From County Jail While Out-to-Court

LOS ANGELES-- On April 19, 2012, at approximately 10 a.m., officials at Wasco State Prison were notified by the Los Angeles Police Department that a state prison inmate, who had been housed in the county jail since March 26, 2012, to attend court proceedings, had been mistakenly released. 

Inmate Larry Darnell Howard, 21, was mistakenly released on April 17, 2012, by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department despite an active hold in place by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. Law enforcement agencies are responding to the incident as an escape and are searching for Howard.

Howard was received from Los Angeles County on January 5, 2012, to serve a two-year sentence for first-degree burglary. He was not scheduled to parole until November 2012.  

Howard is described as a black male, 5 feet 11 inches, 185 pounds, medium build, with black hair and brown eyes.

Anyone with information about this inmate is encouraged to call 911. 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 19, 2012
Contact: Henry Cervantez
(661) 758-7029

Juvenile Offender Escapee from Hospital Returned to Custody

Sacramento – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today announced that a juvenile offender who escaped from a hospital in Sacramento County on Monday night was captured early Tuesday morning and has been returned to custody.

Joshua Ryen Govea, 15, was taken into custody without incident by CDCR’s Special Services Agents at approximately 2 am in Sacramento County and has been returned to the N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility in Stockton.  The Sacramento Police Department, Stocton Police Department, the California Highway Parol and U.S. Marshal's Service assisted in the search.

On April 18 at approximately 7 p.m. Govea got keys during a struggle with staff at Sierra Vista Hospital, pushed his way past nurses and escaped from the hospital wearing only a gray hospital gown.

Govea will be charged with escape.

Govea was committed to the Division of Juvenile Justice from Kings County Juvenile Court with a conviction for first-degree burglary.

at 11:25 AM

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Walk-Away from California State Prison-Sacramento Apprehended

REPRESA -- The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) took inmate Marco Cabrera, 32, a minimum-security inmate who walked away from the Minimum Support
Facility at California State Prison-Sacramento on April 15, into custody after he was arrested by Folsom Police Department officers on April 16.

Cabrera was apprehended at approximately 6:30 p.m. near Green Valley Rd. in El Dorado Hills on April 16 by Folsom Police Department officers who had responded to a 911 call from a local resident. The officers arrested Cabrera and transported him to the Folsom Police Station where he was processed. He could possibly face additional charges of vehicle theft and robbery.

Cabrera was committed from Tulare County on August 4, 2011, to serve a five-year sentence for assault with a firearm, transportation/sale of marijuana, corporal injury on a spouse, possession of an assault weapon, and possession of a firearm and ammunition by an ex-felon. This matter will be referred to the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office for prosecution.

Of all offenders who have escaped from an adult institution, camp or community-based program since 1977, 98.7 percent have been apprehended.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 17, 2012
Contact: Sgt. Levance Quinn
(916) 294-3012

Monday, April 16, 2012

CDCR Awards System-wide Telephone Contract That Will Restrict Cellular Phones in Prisons

No cost to the State for technology to reduce contraband cell phone use 

SACRAMENTO—The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today announced a “groundbreaking and momentous” contract awarded to Global Tel*Link (GTL) designed to eliminate the contraband cell phone use by inmates.

Under the contract, GTL will also provide the Inmate/Ward Telephone System (IWTS) for inmates to make domestic and international calls from an authorized phone network.

“Inmates have used cell phones to commit more crimes, organize assaults on staff, and terrorize victims,” CDCR Secretary Matthew Cate said. “This groundbreaking and momentous technology will enable CDCR to crack down on the potentially dangerous communications by inmates.” 

Managed Access technology uses a secure cellular umbrella over a specified area blocking unauthorized cellular communication transmissions, such as e-mails, texts, phone calls, or Internet access. 

Implementation of the Managed Access System will come at no cost to taxpayers. GTL is responsible for all implementation costs, including new installation of equipment and services, as well as the costs of operating this technology at CDCR institutions. GTL, in return, receives the revenue generated from the ITWS services.

CDCR anticipates the Managed Access System to be operational at its first institution by the end of the year with other institutions to follow.

The Federal Communications Commission supports Managed Access technology as a lawful means to effectively stop the use of contraband cell phones in prisons.

In October 2011, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. signed Senate Bill (SB) 26 (Padilla) into law. Under SB 26 it is a misdemeanor, with a possible fine of up to $5,000 per device, for possessing or attempting to introduce an unauthorized cell phone in a prison. The misdemeanor prosecution and fines apply to staff, contractors and visitors. Penalties for inmates include up to 90 days loss of good-time credits.

SB 26 prohibited the company from raising rates for collect calls on the Inmate/Ward Telephone System. In fact, called parties will realize a reduced rate under the new contract. The new IWTS will provide additional enhancements including multiple payment options for inmates and their families. The California Technology Agency, which owns and administers the contract, will monitor service to ensure there are no additional charges applied to calls. 

In 2011, CDCR tested the Managed Access technology at two institutions. The test was conducted over an 11-day period for approximately eight hours a day. During the test, the equipment detected a total of 2,593 unique wireless devices.  The equipment blocked more than 25,000 unauthorized communication attempts, such as calls, texts, emails, and efforts to log on to the Internet from a smart phone.

In 2007, CDCR staff discovered nearly 1,400 contraband cell phones. In 2008, it was 2,800; in 2009, 6,995; in 2010, approximately 10,760; in 2011, more than 15,000; and to date this year, 2,181 contraband cell phones have been discovered in prisons and Conservation Camps. 

For more information about managed-access technology and other efforts by CDCR to reduce contraband cell phones inside California’s prisons, visit CDCR’s Contraband Cell Phone webpage here: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Contraband-Cell-Phones/index.html

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For Immediate Release
April 16, 2012
Contact: Dana Simas
(916) 445-4950

Alder Conservation Camp Walkaway Apprehended

Klamath-- The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) announced that inmate Justine William Hardin, a minimum security inmate who walked away from the Alder Conservation Camp in Klamath, CA. on April 13, 2012, was apprehended near the camp on April 15, 2012 by special agents from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.
  
Hardin was captured at approximately 9:00 a.m., on April 15, 2012, the walkaway was captured, arrested and taken into custody.  He was medically cleared and transported to the California Correctional Center in Susanville, California.

Hardin was serving a conviction for corporal injury on spouse from Santa Clara County and was scheduled to be paroled in November 2013.  This matter will be referred to the Del Norte County District Attorney’s Office for prosecution.

Of all offenders who have escaped from an adult institution, camp or community-based program since 1977, 99.1 percent have been apprehended.
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 15, 2012
Contact: Margaret Pieper
(530) 257-2181 extension 4110

Inmate walks away from Alder Creek Conservation Camp/Klamath California

SUSANVILLE-- On April 13, 2012, a minimum-security inmate walked away from Alder Creek Conservation Camp which is located just outside Klamath, CA. 
  
Justin William Hardin, 35, is described as a white male, 155 pounds, with green eyes, brown hair and medium complexion.  He stands approximately 5’10” tall with a medium build.  He was last seen wearing grey sweat pants, grey shirt and a light color beanie. 

Hardin was committed to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation on September 7, 2010, from Santa Clara County for Corporal Injury on Spouse.  He was scheduled to be paroled in November 2013.

He was last seen approximately 11:30 p.m. 

Apprehension efforts are continuing.  Anyone seeing him should contact 9-1-1 or law enforcement authorities immediately.

Anyone having information about or knowledge of the location of Justin William Hardin should contact the CCC Watch Commander at 530-257-2181x4173.  All media inquiries should be directed to Margaret Pieper, Public Information Officer, at the California Correctional Center at (530) 257-2181 extension 4110.




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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 13, 2012
Contact: Margaret Pieper
(530) 257-2181 extension 4110

Minimum Security Inmate Walks Away from California State Prison-Sacramento

Inmate discovered missing during institutional count

REPRESA –On April 15, 2012, at approximately 9:05 p.m. A minimum-security inmate was discovered missing during an institutional count from the Minimum Support Facility (MSF) at California State Prison-Sacramento (SAC).
  
Marco Cabrera, 32, was received from Tulare County on August 4, 2011, to serve a five-year sentence for assault with a firearm, transportation/sell of marijuana, corporal injury on a  spouse, possession of an assault weapon, and possession of a firearm and ammunition by an ex-felon.  

Cabrera is described as a Hispanic male five feet nine inches tall with brown hair and brown eyes. He is medium build and weighs approximately 200 pounds.

Cabrera is one of the 222 minimum security inmates housed in a dormitory-style setting, located outside of the maximum security perimeter of the institution. Minimum security inmates normally serve sentences of three to five years and are convicted of non-violent, non-serious, and non sex-offenses.

The institution’s Investigative Services Unit, Crisis Response Team (CRT), Special Services Unit, local law enforcement agencies and the California Highway Patrol have been notified to assist in the search for Cabrera. Pursuit efforts have been activated and anyone seeing Cabrera should contact their local law enforcement agency immediately.

CSP-Sacramento is a multi-mission institution that houses approximately 2,800 inmates and employs more than 1,700 staff. Opened in 1986, the institution houses minimum-security inmates in its Minimum Support Facility which does not have a secure perimeter. The institution houses maximum-security inmates inside of its secure perimeter who are serving long sentences and have proved to be management problems at other institutions.

 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 16, 2012
Contact: Sgt. Levance Quinn
(916) 294-3012