Thursday, June 28, 2012

Governor Signs Sweeping Plan to Save Billions in Corrections Costs and End Court Oversight of State Prisons


Sacramento – Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. on Wednesday signed into law an historic reform of California’s penal system. Known as the blueprint, the plan will cut billions in spending, comply with multiple federal court orders for inmate medical, mental health and dental care, and significantly improve the operation of California’s prison system. The Governor’s approval of the blueprint follows its release by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) in April and its approval by the State Legislature yesterday.

The multi-year plan for CDCR will cut billions in spending, enable the State to comply with multiple federal court orders concerning inmate health care, and significantly improve the operation of California’s prison system.

“We appreciate the confidence of the Legislature in our plan for a safer and more efficient correctional system,” said CDCR Secretary Matthew Cate. “The passage of our blueprint will show the federal courts that California is serious about ending the long-standing lawsuits overseeing much of our operations.”

Highlights of the CDCR blueprint include:

·         Spending less taxpayer money on prisons. The operational General Fund budget of CDCR falls next year to $8.55 billion, nearly half-a-billion dollars less than the current year. When the blueprint is fully implemented, CDCR’s budget will fall by more than $1.5 billion.

·         Improving and expanding health care facilities and rehabilitative programming. CDCR has achieved and will maintain constitutional levels of medical, mental health and dental care, thus ending the significant cost of litigation and court oversight.

·         Building and staffing a more efficient prison system. CDCR is changing its staffing levels and ratios to take into account the falling inmate population. In the 2012-13 budget, CDCR also gets authority to start work on more cost-effective prison housing. Infill projects will replace California Rehabilitation Center, and old and costly prison in Norco to be closed by 2016.

Many of the improvements in California prisons are due to the reduction in overcrowding made possible by Public Safety Realignment signed into law by Governor Brown last year. Since Realignment took effect, CDCR’s offender population has dropped by approximately 23,000 inmates. Overcrowding has been reduced from a high of more than 200 percent of design capacity to approximately 152 percent today. These declines are projected to continue through further implementation of Public Safety Realignment.

The blueprint, titled “The Future of California Corrections,” can be read at www.cdcr.ca.gov.

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

CDCR Meets Second Court Benchmark to Reduce Prison Crowding



SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today announced that it has met an important benchmark to reduce the state’s prison population.

A Three-Judge Court order, affirmed by the U.S. Supreme Court, requires CDCR to cut its prison population to 124,000 by June 27, 2012 and ultimately reduce overcrowding by 34,000 inmates. On June 20, the most recent count, California’s prison inmate population was 121,129. This achievement is the result of Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr.’s public safety Realignment policy, which ensures that many lower-level offenders are punished and managed at the local level.

“We are ahead of schedule. We were required to get down to 124,000 inmates by the end of June and we actually reached that number in mid-April,” said CDCR Secretary Matthew Cate. “The population drop is increasing our savings while allowing us to more strongly emphasize rehabilitation.”  

Public safety Realignment (Assembly Bill 109) was implemented October 1, 2011. Realignment shifts responsibility and funding for non-serious, non-violent, non-sex offenders from the State of California to counties, which can more effectively sanction and rehabilitate offenders.

The reduction of crowding enables other improvements at CDCR, including a renewed commitment to rehabilitation. CDCR’s overall plans for the next five years are laid out in “The Future of California Corrections,” a blueprint that was released in April. Once implemented, it will save California billions in spending, end costly federal oversight of inmate medical, mental health and dental care, and significantly improve the operation of the state’s prison system.

Under the Three-Judge Court’s prisoner reduction order, affirmed by the U.S. Supreme Court in May 2011, the inmate population in California’s 33 prisons must be no more than:

•         167 percent of design capacity by December 27, 2011(133,016 inmates)

•         155 percent by June 27, 2012 (124,000 inmates)

•         147 percent by December 27, 2012 (117,000 inmates)

•         137.5 percent by June 27, 2013 (110,000 inmates)

Although it is fairly standard for prisons to house two inmates in a cell, a prison’s design capacity is calculated based on one inmate per cell, single-level bunks in dormitories, and no beds in places not designed for housing. Current design capacity in CDCR’s 33 institutions is 79,650. Realignment enables the State to safely reduce the inmate population as a percentage of design capacity without either quickly building a number of new prisons or resorting to early release of inmates.



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Copies of monthly status reports (including the documents filed for the six-month benchmark), a graph tracking the prison population and other information are on CDCR’s Three-Judge Court webpage: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/News/3_judge_panel_decision.html.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, June 25, 2012
Please Contact: Jeffrey Callison
(916) 445-4950

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

INMATE RIOT WASCO STATE PRISON – RECEPTION CENTER UNDER CONTROL


WASCO – On June 26, 2012, approximately 10:02 a.m., a riot involving approximately 80 reception center inmates erupted on the Facility A yard at Wasco State Prison-Reception Center.  Responding staff used pepper spray, blast grenades and exact impact munitions to bring the incident under control; however, the less-lethal munitions did not stop the inmates from rioting and they ignored staff orders and continued to fight.  Officers fired three warning shots from the Ruger Mini 14 rifle to quell the incident. No inmates were struck by the lethal rounds.

Two inmates were transported to local hospitals as a result of injuries they sustained during their involvement in the riot.

No employees were injured.

Staff recovered numerous inmate-made weapons.

Prison officials are currently assessing the cause of the riot. Reception center inmates were placed on a modified program as a result of the riot.  An investigation is currently ongoing.

WSP-RC’s primary mission is to provide short-term housing necessary to process, classify, and evaluate new inmates physically and mentally, and determine their security level, program requirements and appropriate institutional placement.  WSP-RC was opened February 1991, houses approximately 5,200 inmates and employs approximately 1,700 people.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 26, 2012 
Contact:  Lt. R. Mazuka 
(661) 758-8400 ext. 5013

Monday, June 25, 2012

WALK AWAY FROM OWENS VALLEY CONSERVATION CAMP


BISHOP – On June 22, 2012, at approximately 10:10 PM, two Sierra Conservation Center inmates assigned to Owens Valley Conservation Camp in Inyo County were discovered missing during a camp count.  Inmates Jessy Lopez and Otoniel Aldana, minimum custody inmates could not be located by camp staff at the completion of the 2210 camp count.  Escape procedures were immediately activated.

Inmate Lopez was serving a six year sentence for Grand Theft Auto from Los Angeles County.  Lopez was scheduled to parole in September of 2012.  Lopez may be wearing orange pants and an orange shirt, black boots and an orange prison jacket with prison lettering.  Lopez is a Hispanic male with black short length hair and brown eyes with a medium build.  Lopez is approximately 5’ 6” tall and weighs approximately 175 pounds.

Inmate Aldana was serving a seven year sentence for Assault with a firearm from Los Angeles County.  Aldana was scheduled to parole in July of 2016.  Aldana may be wearing orange pants and an orange shirt, black boots and an orange prison jacket with prison lettering.  Aldana is a Hispanic male with black short length hair and brown eyes with a medium build.  Aldana is approximately 5’ 8” tall and weighs approximately 165 pounds.

A search for inmates Lopez and Aldana was immediately initiated and Officials have notified surrounding residents as well as local Law Enforcement Agencies.  If anyone sees Lopez or Aldana, please notify your local authorities, Owens Valley Camp, or call 911.

Owens Valley Conservation Camp, CC #26, which opened in 1963, houses approximately 128 minimum security inmates and is located approximately ten miles north of Bishop on Highway 395.  Owens Valley Camp is jointly operated by CAL FIRE and CDCR and is under the jurisdiction of Sierra Conservation Center.  The primary mission of this camp is to respond to statewide Wildfire emergencies and fire prevention conservation projects within Inyo and Mono Counties.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 23, 2012
CONTACT:  J. FROHREICH
CORRECTIONAL LIEUTENANT 
(760)  387-2686

Friday, June 22, 2012

Inmate Apprehended After Walking Away from Fenner Canyon Conservation Camp in Los Angeles County


Valyermo-- California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) Special Service Unit (SSU) agents apprehended a minimum-security inmate who walked away last night from the Fenner Canyon Conservation Camp, located near the community of Valyermo in Los Angeles Count. 

At approximately 8:30 am, CDCR's SSU- Rancho Cucamonga agents identified Tom Williams III, 31, at a known residence in Lancaster and took inmate  into custody after he walked away from the camp Thursday night.
Williams was committed to CDCR on August, 9, 2011 from Los Angeles County to serve a three-year, four-month sentence for possession of a firearm by an ex-felon.  He was scheduled to parole in January 2013.

Of all offenders who have escaped or walked away from an adult institution, camp or community-based program since 1977, 98.7 percent have been apprehended.
 
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Juvenile Offender Graduates Earn Diplomas, GEDs In Ventura


SACRAMENTO---Fifty-five youth from the Mary B. Perry High School, located inside the Ventura Youth Correctional Facility in Camarillo, today received high school diplomas or GEDs, approximately one-third of the youthful offenders who will complete their education this year in the state Division of Juvenile Justice.

The graduations continue a trend of increasing academic achievement even as the offender population in DJJ has decreased, while data compiled for courts overseeing the education program show math and reading scores similar to those of students in public school districts.

“Rehabilitation is the primary objective of our juvenile justice program and a high school education is the foundation for building a successful life,” noted Matthew Cate, CDCR Secretary.   “Over the last seven years, with guidance from court-appointed experts, we have strengthened our education program to ensure that when these youth return to the community, they are more prepared to be constructive citizens.”

The DJJ operates high schools in each of its three correctional facilities that are accredited by the Western Association of Colleges and Schools and with curriculum that meets all California Department of Education Standards.  DJJ students attend the same full day of school as students in public high school.   In addition, students received supplemental services, such as English Learner curriculum or individual special education plans. 

Recent data compiled for the court that oversees DJJ’s programs show a steady increase in the proportion of youth receiving diplomas or GED’s despite a significant decrease in the youthful offender population over the same amount of time. 
 In the 2004/05 academic year, when a reform plan was developed in response to a lawsuit (Farrell) over substandard education, 250 youth earned diplomas or GED’s, out of a population of 3,133.  By comparison, in the 2010/11school year, 375 youth earned that level of academic achievement in a population that had dropped to 1,042.
 
In addition, 205 youth were enrolled in college courses in the 2010/11 school year, compared to 363 in 2004/05 when the DJJ population was three times larger.

That progress also is revealed in math and English scores for DJJ youth in the California High School Exit Exam.  Recent test scores show that DJJ youth passed the math and English portion of the exam at 32 percent and 24 percent, respectively.  Scores for students in the Fresno Unified School District were 19 percent in both subjects while students at Grant Union High School District near Sacramento passed at a rate of 30 and 33 percent, respectively. 

Forty-four youth received graduation diplomas from the N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility in Stockton earlier this month and those from the O.H. Close Youth Correctional Facility, also in Stockton, will receive diplomas in October.
  

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 22, 2012
Contact: Bill Sessa    (916) 445-4950
Karette Fussell           (805) 485-7951 

Inmate Walks Away from Fenner Canyon Conservation Camp in Los Angeles County


Valyermo-- California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) officials are looking for a minimum-security inmate who walked away last night from the Fenner Canyone Conservation Camp, located near the community of Valyermo in Los Angeles County

Inmate Tom Williams III, 31, was last seen in his assigned bed at approximately 8:55 pm during a camp count.

Camp staff searched the inmate dormitory area, surrounding buildings and the camp perimeter after he was discovered missing.  All local law enforcement agencies and the California Highway Patrol have been notified and are assisting in the search for Williams.  Apprehension efforts are continuing. 

Inmate Tom Williams is described as a Black Male, 6’01”, 180 pounds, with black hair and brown eyes.  He was committed to CDCR on August, 9, 2011 from Los Angeles County to serve a three-year, four-month sentence for possession of a firearm by an ex-felon.  He was scheduled to parole in January 2013.

Anyone with information on the location of Inmate Tom Williams or having other relevant information is asked to contact the Fenner Canyon Conservation Camp Commander at (661) 944-0173, or the Sierra Conservation Center Watch Commander at (209) 984-5291, extension 5439.
















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Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Officials Continue Investigation into Riot at Salinas Valley State Prison

Remaining hospitalized inmates in stable condition


SOLEDAD-- Officials from Salinas Valley State Prison's (SVSP) Investigative Services Unit are continuing to look into the cause of a riot that occurred Tuesday morning on one of the institution's maximum-security, general population facilities.

Initial investigation shows 69 inmates participated in the riot. Eleven inmates had injuries requiring ambulance transportation to outside hospitals with one inmate being airlifted to a local hospital and who remains in stable condition. Two inmates were admitted to the hospital and are in stable condition. The remaining nine were treated and sent back to the institution the same day. An additional eight inmates were treated at the institution’s medical treatment center.

Staff recovered eight stabbing/slashing weapons from the incident area.

Correctional peace officers used pepper spray and non-deadly force options to quell the riot that broke out at 11:10 am Tuesday.

One staff member was injured while responding to the incident but the injury was not inflicted by an inmate.

The facility is on modified program pending an administrative review into the cause of the riot.

Salinas Valley State Prison opened in May 1996 and is located on approximately 300 acres in Monterey County.  The institution’s mission is to provide long-term housing for both minimum- and maximum-custody male inmates.

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Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Officials Investigating Riot at Salinas Valley State Prison

More than 150 inmates involved

SOLEDAD-- Officials from Salinas Valley State Prison's (SVSP) Investigative Services Unit are investigating the cause of a riot that occurred this morning on one of the maximum-security, general population facilities.  

Correctional peace officers used pepper spray and less-than-lethal force options to quell the riot that broke out at 11:10 am.

One inmate was airlifted to a local hospital. Initial numbers show 159 inmates were involved in the riot.

In total, 18 inmates suffered injuries from stab wounds, slash wounds, and head trauma. One inmate was airlifted to a local hospital; another ten were taken by ambulance. Seven inmates were treated at the institution’s medical facility. 

Medical and custody staff are continuing their assessments of all inmates on the yard to ensure no one is missed that has an injury. A supervisor from American Medical Response is on site assisting institutional staff in determining where to best send the inmates for medical care.

One staff member was injured while responding to the incident but the injury was not inflicted by an inmate.

The facility is on modified program pending an administrative review into the cause of the riot.

Salinas Valley State Prison opened in May 1996 and is located on approximately 300 acres in Monterey County.  The institution’s mission is to provide long-term housing for both minimum- and maximum-custody male inmates.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 19, 2012
Contact: Lt. Michael Nilsson
(831) 678-5500 ext. 5554

Frequent Prison Miles

Professor takes 103rd tour of California facilities

Since coming to California in 1983, Paul Sutton, a retired criminal justice professor at San Diego State University (SDSU), has seen the inside of more prisons than many CDCR employees who have spent their entire careers with the department.

Sutton just recently concluded his 103rd tour of a California prison. Over the past 30 years he has taken more than two thousand criminal justice administration students from SDSU on what the students describe as a “fascinating and mind-blowing” experience.

Being able to view the different way each facility ran and it's different parameters regarding level of security was fascinating,” said Barbara Rudd, a fourth-year criminal justice major at SDSU.I enjoyed every bit of it, but the most amazing part was being able to view our state's history of prisons all in one week.” 

When Sutton moved to California to teach at SDSU he became the resident expert on prisons – although he hadn’t actually been to a California prison. He was known for his Emmy-winning documentary “Doing Time,” based on a New Mexico penitentiary, that he made while a sociology professor at the University of New Mexico.

His first class of students asked to tour a California prison, and so began the weeklong tradition. In the spring of 1983, Sutton took his first class of students to eight California institutions. They carpooled in six cars, Sutton described it as “one of the worst, but an incredible tour.” In the days before portable GPS devices or smart phones they relied on paper maps, which sometimes didn’t show the prison, resulting in some wrong turns.

Despite the challenges of the first tour, Sutton continued the tradition and eventually graduated to 15-passenger vans. Today’s tours now travel in executive buses, which makes for a much more enjoyable excursion. The tour typically leaves at 5:20 a.m. on a Monday from San Diego and returns about 8 p.m. on Friday.

In the early days of the tours the students visited all of California’s institutions. Now that CDCR has expanded to 33 institutions, the five-day tour hits about 18 prisons. The institutions include both male and female facilities, minimum-, medium-, and maximum-security institutions, and the Delancey Street Foundation in San Francisco. 

“I’m big on getting these students exposed to the reality of the situation that they will one day deal with and they’ll be a direct or even indirect part of,” Sutton said. “They need to know what goes on inside prison and understand the complexities that make it much different than the ‘lockup’ world we see on TV.”

The tour has settled into a schedule that accommodates two prison tours a day. The institutions include San Quentin, Folsom, California Men’s Colony in San Luis Obispo, Central California Women’s Facility in Chowchilla, and Correctional Training Facility in Soledad.

At CMC, the tour is conducted by some of the inmates, usually lifers, who have shown good behavior. The students “are scared to death going in because all they see of prisons is what’s on TV and shows like ‘Lockup.’ By the end, they’re amazed by what actually happens inside the prison walls,” said Sutton.

“It was a wonderful experience, a true eye-opener of prison in California. The whole prison tour was a stand-out moment” said recent Criminal Justice graduate Magdalena Hernandez. 

A couple of years ago Sutton filmed a documentary, “Prisons Through Tomorrow’s Eyes,” in which he interviewed students before, during and after the tours to capture their changing perspectives.
“Typically, by the end of the tour, they’re at 180 degrees from their original viewpoint,” said Sutton. The film is now an official selection at the Cannes Film Festival in France.

Although Sutton is retired he plans to continue offering students the opportunity to tour CDCR facilities.

Check out more Inside CDCR Newsletter stories here: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/News/inside-CDCR/index.html

 

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Inmates Graduate from Construction Training Program


Inmates Graduate from Construction Training Program

SACRAMENTO – A dozen inmates from the California Institution for Men (CIM) in Chino are the first to complete a new academic program that makes them eligible to become apprentice craftsmen when they are released.

The CIM graduates will join approximately 500 inmates since 2002 who have earned certificates in the Inmate Ward Labor Construction Program.  The Pre-Apprenticeship curriculum that teaches a basic overview of the building and trades industry, health and safety regulations, CPR and first aid, as well as how to read blueprints, and other topics.

“Few things motivate a former inmate more than getting a job,” said Deborah Hysen, Chief Deputy Secretary for the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, who manages construction and maintenance of CDCR facilities.  “These men have taken an important step toward getting a career and leading a more constructive life.”

Inmates eligible for the program must have a high school diploma or be in the process of obtaining a General Education Development (GED) certificate.  The seven-segment curriculum includes four hours of academic work and 36 hours of field training each week. Inmates must complete 120 hours of study in the classroom to earn a certificate of completion.

During their training, the inmates have worked on many remodel and repair projects at CIM to increase mobility and access for impaired inmates, including repairing broken sidewalks and installing curb cuts and ramps, and repairing a medical dispensary, infirmary, the gym and several inmate housing units.

The Pre-Apprenticeship Program, a collaboration with the State Building and Construction Trades Council of California and local Southern California trade unions, was created to increase the rehabilitative value of a training program in construction established by CDCR in 1983.    

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 12, 2012
Contact: Bill Sessa
(916) 445-4950 
      

Monday, June 11, 2012

Missing Inmate from Miramonte Conservation Camp Back in Custody

MIRAMONTE, CA- California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) staff took inmate Jose Garcia, 39, into custody after he turned himself in at approximately 11:00 p.m. on Friday, June 8, 2012.

Inmate Garcia, a minimum-custody inmate, walked away from the Miramonte Conservation Camp in Fresno County at approximately 11:30 pm on Wednesday, June 6. 

He was committed to CDCR on February 24, 2012 from Santa Clara County to serve a seven-year sentence for disregard for safety. He was scheduled to be released to parole in May 2015.

Of all offenders who have escaped or walked away from an adult institution, camp or community-based program since 1977, 98.7 percent have been apprehended.
 
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Friday, June 8, 2012


Juvenile Offender Graduates Receive Diplomas, GEDs In Stockton
Graduation Rates increase even as DJJ population decreases 

SACRAMENTO---Forty two youth from the N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility in Stockton today received high school diplomas or GEDs, approximately one-third of the youthful offenders who will complete their education this year in the state Division of Juvenile Justice.

The graduations continue a trend of increasing academic achievement even as the offender population in DJJ has decreased, while data compiled for courts overseeing the education program show math and reading scores similar to those of students in public school districts.

“Rehabilitation is the primary objective of our juvenile justice program and a high school education is the foundation for building a successful life,” noted Matthew Cate, CDCR Secretary.   “Over the last seven years, with guidance from court-appointed experts, we have strengthened our education program to ensure that when these youth return to the community, they are more prepared to be constructive citizens.”

The DJJ operates high schools in each of its three correctional facilities that are accredited by the Western Association of Colleges and Schools and with curriculum that meets all California Department of Education Standards.  DJJ students attend the same full day of school as students in public high school.   In addition, students received supplemental services, such as English Learner curriculum or individual special education plans. 

Recent data compiled for the court that oversees DJJ’s programs show a steady increase in the proportion of youth receiving diplomas or GED’s despite a significant decrease in the youthful offender population over the same amount of time. 

In the 2004/05 academic year, when a reform plan was developed in response to a lawsuit (Farrell) over substandard education, 250 youth earned diplomas or GED’s, out of a population of 3,133.  By comparison, in the 2010/11school year, 375 youth earned that level of academic achievement in a population that had dropped to 1,042.
 
In addition, 205 youth were enrolled in college courses in the 2010/11 school year, compared to 363 in 2004/05 when the DJJ population was three times larger.

That progress also is revealed in math and English scores for DJJ youth in the California High School Exit Exam.  Recent test scores show that DJJ youth passed the math and English portion of the exam at 32 percent and 24 percent, respectively.  Scores for students in the Fresno Unified School District were 19 percent in both subjects while students at Grant Union High School District near Sacramento passed at a rate of 30 and 33 percent. 

Approximately 45 youth will receive graduation diplomas from the Ventura Youth Correctional Facility on June 22 and those from the O.H. Close Youth Correctional Facility in Stockton will hold a graduation ceremony in October.
  

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 8, 2012
Contact: Bill Sessa 
916-445-4950

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Inmate Walks Away from Miramonte Conservation Camp in Fresno County


MIRAMONTE-- California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) officials are looking for a minimum-security inmate who walked away from the Miramonte Conservation Camp in Fresno County last night. 

Inmate Jose Garcia, 39, was last seen at his assigned bed at approximately 11:30 pm during a camp count.

Staff searched the inmate dorm area, surrounding buildings and the camp perimeter after he was discovered missing. All local law enforcement agencies and the California Highway Patrol have been notified and are assisting in the search for Lopez.  Apprehension efforts are continuing. 
Inmate Jose Garcia is described as a Hispanic male, 5'11", 155 pounds, with black hair and brown eyes. He was committed to CDCR on February 24, 2012 from Santa Clara County to serve a seven-year sentence for disregard for safety. He was scheduled to be released to parole in May 2015.

Anyone knowing the location of Inmate Jose Garcia or having other relevant information is asked to contact the Miramonte Conservation Camp Commander at (559) 336-2312 or the Sierra Conservation Center Watch Commander at (209) 984-5291, extension 5439.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 7, 2012
Contact: Lt. Alyce von Savoye
(209) 984-5291 ext. 5499

Monday, June 4, 2012

Missing Inmate from Deuel Vocational Institution Apprehended

TRACY, CA- California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation staff apprehended inmate Raul Edgardo Lopez, 25, at approximately 12:30 p.m. on Monday, June 4, 2012.

Inmate Lopez, a minimum-custody inmate assigned to the institution’s dairy, walked away from the Minimum Support Facility at Deuel Vocational Institution (DVI) early Monday morning.

Investigative Services Unit (ISU) Officers, acting on a tip from a Tracy resident who reported a possible sighting of Lopez, responded to the downtown area of Tracy. When they arrived, ISU staff identified Lopez and took him into custody without incident. Lopez was transported back to DVI and placed in Administrative Segregation.

Of all offenders who have escaped or walked away from an adult institution, camp or community-based program since 1977, 98.7 percent have been apprehended.
 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 9, 2012
Contact: Lt. George Paul
(209) 830-3851

Inmate Walks Away from Deuel Vocational Institution



TRACY-- On Monday June 04, 2012, at approximately 2:30 a.m. a Deuel Vocational Institution (DVI) inmate assigned to the Minimum Support Facility was discovered missing. 

Inmate Raul Edgardo Lopez, 25, a minimum-custody inmate, assigned to the institution’s dairy, was unaccounted for at the 02:30 a.m. count. 

Staff searched the facility grounds and the immediate area of the surrounding community after he was discovered missing. All local law enforcement agencies and the California Highway Patrol have been notified and are assisting in the search of Lopez.  Apprehension efforts are continuing.  Anyone seeing him should contact authorities immediately.

Inmate Lopez was received by CDCR on August 10, 2011 from Los Angeles County to serve a five-year sentence for second-degree robbery. Lopez was scheduled to parole in June 2015.

Lopez is 5’ 9” and weighs 191 pounds with a medium build, black hair and brown eyes. He was last seen wearing blue pants and blue shirt with “CDCR Prisoner” printed on the pants.

Anyone having information or knowing the location of Raul Lopez please contact DVI Escape Commander at 209-830-3856.

DVI houses reception center inmates from 22 Northern California counties, minimum and medium custody general population male inmates.  The institution houses approximately 2,500 inmates and employs 1,100.



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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 4, 2012
Contact: Lt. George Paul
(209) 830-3851