Monday, December 30, 2013

Condemned Inmate Albert Ruiz, 51, Dies of Natural Causes

VACAVILLE -- Condemned inmate Albert Ruiz, 51, was pronounced dead early Sunday morning, December 29, 2013. He died of natural causes in the On-Site Acute Hospital Unit at the California Medical Facility (CMF) in Vacaville, CA. 

Ruiz was sentenced to death on January 27, 2003, by a Merced County jury for the May 22, 1998, murder and robbery of a Merced liquor and grocery store owner, Abdo Muhammed, 42, and the murder of Antonio Cruz, a 74-year-old customer in the store.  Ruiz had been on death row since January 28, 2003.
Since 1978 when California reinstated capital punishment, 62 condemned inmates (including Ruiz) have died from natural causes, 22 have committed suicide, 13 have been executed in California, one was executed in Missouri, six have died from other causes, and for one of them, the cause of death is pending. There are 746 offenders on California’s death row.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
DECEMBER 30, 2013
CONTACT: SAM ROBINSON
(415) 455-5008


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Monday, December 23, 2013

New Study Shows Post-Prison Arrests are Down, Convictions Static under Realignment

CDCR tracked inmates released from prison pre- and post-Realignment

SACRAMENTO, CA – One-year arrest rates are down and conviction rates are virtually static for offenders released after completing their state prison sentences post-Realignment, according to a report released today by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR).

“The results here are very encouraging, especially when you consider they reflect the very beginning of Realignment, when counties were in the early stages of implementing rehabilitative programs.” said CDCR Secretary Jeff Beard. “As we move forward and both CDCR and the counties utilize state funds to invest more in rehabilitation efforts, I’m confident we will see fewer former inmates re-offending.”

For this Realignment Report, CDCR indentified all offenders who had served their full sentence and were released from prison during the first year after the implementation of Realignment (October 2011 through September 2012). Researchers then tracked the offenders, which include those released to state parole supervision and those released to county probation supervision, for one year to see if they were re-arrested, convicted of a new crime, or returned to state prison. CDCR then compared those results with all offenders released during October 2010 to September 2011 (pre-Realignment) and tracked them for one year in the same manner.

Key findings include:

• Post-Realignment offenders were arrested at a lower rate than pre-Realignment offenders (58.9 percent pre-Realignment and 56.2 percent post-Realignment).

• The rate of post-Realignment offenders convicted of new crimes is nearly the same as the rate of pre-Realignment offenders convicted of new crimes (20.9 percent pre-realignment and 21.0 percent post realignment).

• Post-Realignment offenders returned to prison at a significantly lower rate than pre-Realignment offenders, an intended effect of Realignment as most offenders are ineligible to return to prison on a parole violation. (32.4 percent pre-Realignment and 7.4 percent post-Realignment)

Under California’s Public Safety Realignment Act of 2011 (AB 109), no offenders receive an early release from state prison. The law, which was passed by the Legislature in response to a federal court order to reduce California’s prison population, has achieved dramatic reductions by stemming the flow of low-level inmates and parole violators into prison. The intent of Realignment is to encourage counties to develop and implement evidenced-based practices and alternatives to incarceration to limit future crimes and reduce victimization.

Prior to Realignment, more than 60,000 felon parole violators returned to state prison annually, with an average length of stay of 90 days. Beginning on October 1, 2011, most parole violations are now served in county jails. Also, offenders newly convicted of certain low-level offenses serve their time in county jail. Under another component of Realignment, inmates who have served their full state prison sentence for a non-serious, non-violent or non-sexual offense are now supervised upon their release by county probation rather than state parole.

To view a copy of the report, visit: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Adult_Research_Branch/Research_Documents/Realignment_1_Year_Report_12-23-13.pdf

To view a fact sheet on Realignment, go to: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/realignment/docs/Realignment-Fact-Sheet.pdf

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For Immediate Release

December 23, 2013

Contact: Jeffrey Callison

(916) 445-4950

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Psychologist at Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison, Corcoran Recovering After Inmate Attack

CORCORAN – A staff psychologist is recovering from injuries she suffered from an attack by a Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison, Corcoran (SATF) inmate yesterday.

At approximately 11:45 a.m., a staff psychologist was escorting inmate Ryan Sanchez, 30, out of her office when inmate Sanchez turned around and struck the psychologist in her face with his fist, causing her to fall to the ground and lose consciousness. 

Inmate Sanchez was subdued and subsequently transported to the Administrative Segregation Unit.

The psychologist was taken to an area hospital and treated for head trauma. She was released and is at home recovering.

Inmate Sanchez was committed to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation on September 11, 2012 from Fresno County to serve a two-year, eight-month sentence for indecent exposure, his second strike.

The matter will be referred to the Kings County District Attorney’s Office for prosecution.

SATF opened August 1997 on approximately 280 acres in Kings County. The institution provides long-term housing for 5,518 minimum- and maximum-custody male inmates and employs 1,828 people.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE.

December 18, 2013

Contact: Lt. Lupe Cartagena

(559) 992-7154

Friday, December 13, 2013

Inmate Death Being Investigated as a Homicide

JAMESTOWN – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) officials are investigating the death of an inmate this evening.

Inmate Andrew Tisnado, 31, died this evening at a valley hospital.  Inmate Tisnado was found by staff in his assigned bed on December 11, 2013, with severe head injuries.  He was transported by air ambulance to a valley hospital, where he was placed on life support.  No other information is available at this time as CDCR is currently investigating Inmate Tisnado’s death as a homicide.   

Inmate Tisnado was a Hispanic male and was committed to CDCR on January 31, 2013 from Los Angeles County to serve a 4 year sentence for Possession of Ammunition by an Ex-Felon.  He was scheduled to parole in November 2015.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 13, 2013
Contact: Lt. von Savoye
(209) 984-5291 ext. 5499

Tuesday, December 3, 2013

CDCR to Hire Approximately 7,000 Correctional Officers

SACRAMENTO— The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) expects to hire approximately 7,000 correctional officers over the next three years due to the increase in retirements.

Currently more than 1,800 CDCR peace officers retire annually. This outflow has led to an increased-  and in some cases urgent- need to fill peace officer positions statewide.

New cadets are paid a monthly salary while attending the CDCR Basic Correctional Officer Academy (BCOA). CDCR peace officers are offered very competitive health, dental, vision and retirement benefits. Job requirements include:

•    High school diploma
•    Proof of U.S. citizenship
•    At least 20 years of age; must be 21 at time of appointment
•    Pass a drug test screening
•    Provide history of law-abiding behavior

•    Legally be able to own, posses and have custody or control of a firearm or other weapons     authorized by CDCR 

Potential candidates must also pass a written test, qualifications assessment, physical fitness test, vision screening, psychological evaluation, pre-employment medical examination and a background investigation.

The application and selection process can take between nine and 12 months. Once the selection process is completed, candidates are offered positions throughout the state and can select their location based on institutional need and availability.

Once the candidate accepts the job, they go to a 16-week academy training at the Richard A. McGee Correctional Training Center in Galt.

During the academy, cadets can earn $3,050 a month as well as benefits. Following graduation, correctional officers can earn $3,774 a month to start, not including wages for overtime worked.

After a couple of years as a correctional officer, there are numerous opportunities for promotion and advancements to correctional sergeant, lieutenant, captain and higher.

There are many different types of positions for correctional officers while working at an institution including, transportation, tower watch, visiting, inmate programs and housing units.

For more information on how to become a correctional officer, visit CDCR’s Careers website here: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Career_Opportunities/POR/Index.html. To access the online application visit: https://pass.cdcr.ca.gov/application.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 3, 2013
CONTACT:   DANA SIMAS
916) 445-4950




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Monday, November 25, 2013

California State Prison-Sacramento Correctional Officer Recovering From Inmate Assault

FOLSOM– A California State Prison-Sacramento (CSP-SAC) correctional officer is recovering from injuries suffered during an unprovoked attack by an inmate Saturday night.

The assault occurred on November 23 at approximately 5:30 p.m. while staff attempted to conduct a random search of inmate Delvin E. Cottingham’s assigned cell.  Inmate Cottingham exited his cell and unexpectedly walked toward the officer and punched the officer in his face, knocking him to the ground. 

Inmate Cottingham then straddled the officer’s chest and repeatedly struck the officer in his face with his fists.  A second officer came to the aid of the first officer and fended off the inmate’s attack.

The officer was taken to a local hospital for treatment.

The officer, a nearly eight-year veteran of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR), suffered a left orbital fracture, a bi-lateral fracture to both sides of his nasal cavity, and abrasions to his forehead, nose, cheeks and eyes. The abrasions to the officer’s face required nine sutures. He is currently at home recovering.

Inmate Cottingham, 39, was received from San Diego County on August 4, 1997, with a 42-years-to-life sentence for first-degree murder, battery with serious bodily injury, second-degree robbery, and an ex-felon in possession of a firearm.

Inmate Cottingham was transferred to the Administrative Segregation Unit at CSP-SAC pending investigation.

The incident is being investigated by the prison’s Investigative Services Unit and will be referred to the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office.

California State Prison-Sacramento is a multi-mission institution that houses more than 2,100 inmates and employs more than 1,700 people.  Opened in 1986, the institution houses maximum security inmates serving long sentences or those who have proved to be management problems at other institutions.  CSP-SAC also houses inmates requiring specialized mental health programming and inmates with high-risk medical concerns. CSP-SAC promotes rehabilitative opportunities via work assignments, vocational training, self-help programming, and educational opportunities.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
NOVEMBER 25, 2013
CONTACT:   BRYAN DONAHOO
(916) 294-3012

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Monday, November 18, 2013

Attempted Murder of a Peace Officer at California State Prison-Sacramento Under Investigation

FOLSOM – California State Prison-Sacramento (CSP-SAC) officials are investigating the attempted murder of a correctional officer that occurred this morning in one of the maximum-security units.

On November 18, 2013, at approximately 8 a.m., inmate Alberto Cortez, 22, tried to murder a 40-year-old correctional officer by repeatedly slashing him with an inmate-made weapon.  A second inmate tried to attack officers who responded to the incident. Cortez who has been in prison since December 23, 2010, is serving a 15-years-to-life sentence from Los Angeles County for attempted first-degree murder and receiving stolen property.

The officer, a 15-year veteran of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, was slashed on his neck.  He was taken to an outside hospital by ambulance for treatment and is in fair condition at this time.

CSP-SAC’s Investigative Services Unit is investigating the incident as an attempted murder.  The Office of the Inspector General’s Bureau of Independent Review was notified of the incident.

California State Prison-Sacramento is a multi-mission institution that houses more than 2,100 inmates and employs more than 1,700 people.  Opened in 1986, the institution houses maximum-security inmates serving long sentences or those who have proved to be management problems at other institutions.  CSP-SAC also houses inmates requiring specialized mental health programming and inmates with high-risk medical concerns. CSP-SAC promotes rehabilitative opportunities through work assignments, vocational training, self-help programs and educational opportunities.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
NOVEMBER 18, 2013
CONTACT:  BRYAN DONAHOO
(916) 294-3012


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Monday, November 4, 2013

CDCR’s Checks on 1,267 Sex-Offenders during Operation Boo

Sweep results in 90 arrests statewide; weapons, drugs and child porn confiscated

SACRAMENTO – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) parole agents arrested 90 of the 1,267 sex-offender parolees who were contacted during compliance checks or searches as part of the 20th annual Operation Boo Child Safety Project on Halloween night 2013.  Most of the arrests were for violations of special conditions of parole; however some offenses were more serious, prompting new charges to be filed against six of the sex-offender parolees.  Six other parolees were found to be out of compliance with their requirements to register as sex offenders.

“The 90 arrests among sex-offender parolees – for possession of child pornography, narcotics, weapons, and other parole violations – and the six new charges, prove that our statewide efforts with Operation Boo on Halloween night are well-founded and necessary,” said Dan Stone, Director of the Division of Adult Parole Operations. 

In addition to the traditional compliance checks, this year Operation Boo included two other features:

•    Parent Empowerment:  CDCR provided a free downloadable brochure with helpful information about ways to talk to children about dangerous behavior in adults, and Internet links for parents to check for sex-offenders in their area. 

•    Transient Sex-Offender Curfew Centers:  Because a significant number of sex-offenders are homeless, transient sex-offenders in most regions were ordered to report to a center to spend the curfew under supervision. Statewide, several special transient sex-offender curfew centers were operated Halloween night.  

For more information about Operation Boo please visit: www.cdcr.ca.gov


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
NOVEMBER 4, 2013
CONTACT: LUIS PATINO
(916) 445-4950

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Friday, November 1, 2013

Inmate Death at Kern Valley State Prison Being Investigated as a Homicide

DELANO – Officials at Kern Valley State Prison (KVSP) are investigating the death of an inmate as a homicide after he was found unresponsive in his cell.

Inmate Carmen T. Guerrero, 48, was pronounced dead at 12:39 a.m. Preliminary reports indicate inmate Guerrero died from strangulation.

Prison officials have named Inmate Guerrero’s cellmate, Miguel Crespo, 42, as a suspect in the case.  Inmate Crespo has been placed in the Administrative Segregation Unit pending an investigation by KVSP investigators, the Kern County Coroner and the Kern County District Attorney.

Inmate Guerrero was serving a life sentence from Kings County for second-degree murder.  Inmate Crespo, is currently serving a life sentence from Los Angeles County for first-degree murder.

KVSP opened in 2005 and houses 3,707 minimum-, medium-, maximum-, and high-security custody inmates.  KVSP offers academic classes and vocational programs and employs approximately 1,800 people.

For more information about KVSP, visit CDCR’s website at www.cdcr.ca.gov.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
NOVEMBER 1, 2013
CONTACT: JEFF SMITH
(661) 721-6314

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Thursday, October 31, 2013

Juvenile Offenders Donate To Stockton Victims Group

Funds will help San Joaquin County Victim Witness Program

SACRAMENTO – Juvenile offenders from the N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility in Stockton have donated 20 percent of their earnings from a work project inside the institution to support a San Joaquin County victim assistance program.

The youth presented a check for $8,235 to the District Attorney’s Victim Witness Program during a late afternoon ceremony yesterday at the facility, the second time in recent years that the program has been chosen by the youth.  The program assists victims and witnesses during crime investigations and court proceedings and helps them to file claims for compensation under the California Victim Compensation Program.  It provided help to 5,198 crime victims last year.

“Donations like this give us extra money to help crime victims with needs that aren’t covered by our grant funds, which have specific, dedicated purposes,” said Gabriela Jaurequi, Program Coordinator.  That can include such expenses as rent, utility bills, transportation costs, and other everyday expenses that squeeze the budgets of crime victims.
  
The youth, all of them high school graduates, earned the funds working for Merit Corporation, a private company that recycles computer equipment in a partnership with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and the California Prison Industry Authority.

"This program teaches youth many skills to help them be successful when they return to their families and communities,” explained Michael Minor, director of the Division of Juvenile Justice.  “They learn responsibility and interpersonal techniques that enable them to work with others, as well as life skills, such as financial planning, resume preparation and goal setting.

“Supporting victim organizations teaches these youth the most important lesson of all, which is compassion for the people who were affected by their crimes,” said Minor.  “That sensitivity toward others is a key to living a constructive life in the community."

In addition to supporting victim groups, a second portion of the youths’ earnings is used to pay for room and board and a third portion is deposited in a savings account that is accessible to the youth when they leave the institution. 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
OCTOBER 31, 2013                                                                                        
CONTACT: BILL SESSA
916) 445-4950

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Juvenile Offenders Donate To Stockton Victims Group

Funds will help San Joaquin County Victim Witness Program

SACRAMENTO – Juvenile offenders from the N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility in Stockton have donated 20 percent of their earnings from a work project inside the institution to support a San Joaquin County victim assistance program.

The youth presented a check for $8,235 to the District Attorney’s Victim Witness Program during a late afternoon ceremony yesterday at the facility, the second time in recent years that the program has been chosen by the youth.  The program assists victims and witnesses during crime investigations and court proceedings and helps them to file claims for compensation under the California Victim Compensation Program.  It provided help to 5,198 crime victims last year.

“Donations like this give us extra money to help crime victims with needs that aren’t covered by our grant funds, which have specific, dedicated purposes,” said Gabriela Jaurequi, Program Coordinator.  That can include such expenses as rent, utility bills, transportation costs, and other everyday expenses that squeeze the budgets of crime victims.  

The youth, all of them high school graduates, earned the funds working for Merit Corporation, a private company that recycles computer equipment in a partnership with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation and the California Prison Industry Authority.

"This program teaches youth many skills to help them be successful when they return to their families and communities,” explained Michael Minor, director of the Division of Juvenile Justice.  “They learn responsibility and interpersonal techniques that enable them to work with others, as well as life skills, such as financial planning, resume preparation and goal setting.

“Supporting victim organizations teaches these youth the most important lesson of all, which is compassion for the people who were affected by their crimes,” said Minor.  “That sensitivity toward others is a key to living a constructive life in the community."

In addition to supporting victim groups, a second portion of the youths’ earnings is used to pay for room and board and a third portion is deposited in a savings account that is accessible to the youth when they leave the institution. 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
OCTOBER 31, 2013
CONTACT: BILL SESSA
(916) 445-4950

Friday, October 25, 2013

CDCR Signs Contract with San Diego County to Allow County Offenders to Participate in State Fire Camps

Housing county offenders in fire camps will provide additional beds for the county and bolster the state’s firefighting force

SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) and San Diego County finalized a contract earlier this month that will allow the county to house some of its inmates in the state’s fire camps.

“This agreement with San Diego County is a win for everyone,” CDCR Secretary Jeff Beard said. “Housing county offenders in conservation camps will provide additional space to the county, contribute to the state’s trained firefighting workforce, protect public safety and provide rehabilitation.”

Up to 100 San Diego County offenders will join the approximately 4,000 other inmates participating in CDCR’s Conservation Camp program. Since 1946, able-bodied inmates in the program have helped with fire suppression and other emergencies, such as floods and earthquakes. Only low-level offenders, both male and female, may participate.

According to the contract, San Diego County will pay the state $46.19 per inmate per day, which covers housing and supervision costs by CDCR as well as the costs of training by the California Department of Forestry and Fire Prevention (CAL FIRE).
CDCR jointly manages 39 adult and juvenile camps with CAL FIRE and five adult camps with the Los Angeles County Fire Department. In an average year, the fire crews provide more than 2.5 million hours of emergency response work and save taxpayers more than $100 million annually. The crews are available year-round and respond to wildfires, floods, heavy snows, search and rescue operations, earthquakes and other emergencies.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
OCTOBER 25, 2013
CONTACT: JONATHAN PARSLEY
(916) 445-4950


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Wednesday, October 23, 2013

California State Prison-Corcoran Officer Attacked by a SHU Inmate

Three other correctional officers also injured in attack

CORCORAN – A California State Prison-Corcoran (CSP-Corcoran) correctional officer was stabbed by an inmate this afternoon.

The incident happened at 3:22 p.m. as officers were escorting inmates from the small management yards to their Security Housing Unit (SHU) cells. Inmate Dan Felix, 35, used a handmade handcuff key to break free from his cuffs. Using an inmate-made weapon, he stabbed a correctional officer several times in his neck, head and shoulder.

Officers responded to the scene. One responding officer was kicked by inmate Steven Rivera, 25. Two other officers incurred injuries to their wrists, backs and knees when they responded to gain control of the combatants.

The first officer was airlifted to a hospital for treatment of several puncture wounds. He is in good condition. The other three officers were also taken to a hospital for treatment.

The prison’s Investigative Services Unit is investigating this incident.

Inmate Felix was admitted from Los Angeles County on April 3, 1997. He is serving life with the possibility of parole for attempted murder.

Inmate Rivera was admitted from Los Angeles County on November 5, 2010. He is serving life without parole for two counts of first-degree murder.

CSP-Corcoran opened in 1988 and houses 4,379 minimum-, medium-, maximum- and high-security custody inmates. The Kings County prison offers academic classes and vocational programs as well as community programs and work crews. The prison employs approximately 2,300 people.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
OCTOBER 22, 2013
CONTACT:  ANTHONY BAER
(559) 992-6104


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Wednesday, October 16, 2013

High Desert State Prison Sergeant Injured from Inmate Attack

SUSANVILLE – A High Desert State Prison (HDSP) sergeant is recovering from injuries suffered during an unprovoked attack by an inmate Monday night.

The assault occurred on October 14 at 6 p.m. after staff completed a clothed body search of inmate Bernard L. Wildee. Staff found contraband and ordered the inmate to submit to handcuffs. Instead, inmate Wildee repeatedly struck a correctional sergeant in his face and head.

Responding staff used physical force to subdue inmate Wildee.

Two HDSP custody staff members were taken to a local hospital for treatment.

The sergeant, a nearly 17-year veteran of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR), suffered a concussion, three lacerations to his right eye and bruises to his face. He is at home recovering.

A correctional officer, a five and a half-year veteran of CDCR, was also taken to a hospital and treated for minor injuries to his right knee and right hand incurred while using physical force to stop inmate Wildee’s attack. He has returned to work.

Inmate Wildee, 39, was received from Sacramento County on September 12, 2005 with a 26-years-to-life sentence for being an ex-felon in possession of a firearm, his third strike. Wildee served a prior commitment from Sacramento County for voluntary manslaughter and assault with a deadly weapon and a 1995 conviction from Solano County for battery on a peace officer.

Inmate Wildee was transferred to the Administrative Segregation Unit at California Correctional Center in Susanville pending investigation.

The incident is being investigated by the prison’s Investigative Services Unit and will be referred to the Lassen County District Attorney’s Office.

High Desert State Prison located in Lassen County opened in 1995 and houses 3,343 minimum-, medium-, and maximum-security Inmates. The institution provides academic classes and vocational instruction and employs approximately 1,210 people.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
OCTOBER 16, 2013
CONTACT: LT. GREGORY CROWE
(530) 251-5100 EXT. 5501

Monday, October 14, 2013

Two Calipatria State Prison Correctional Officers Recovering from Inmate Assault

CALIPATRIA – Two correctional officers are being treated for injuries they suffered from an attack by a Calipatria State Prison inmate Sunday.

On October 13 at 9:45 a.m., a correctional officer approached inmate Anthony J. Martin to escort him to a program office to speak to a sergeant. The inmate turned and unexpectedly punched the officer in his face, knocking him to the ground.

Inmate Martin then picked up a metal chair and was standing over the officer on the ground. A second officer came to the aid of the first officer and fended off the inmate’s attack. Inmate Martin threw the metal chair at the responding officer.

Inmate Martin was subdued by responding staff and subsequently re-housed in the Administrative Segregation Unit pending investigation into the incident.

The officers were taken to an area hospital and treated for their injuries.

The first officer, a 20-year veteran of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR), suffered a split upper lip and broken teeth. Some of his teeth are lodged in his upper palate. He will need to undergo specialized surgery and is at home recovering.

The second officer, a 22-year veteran of CDCR, suffered bruising to his arms and legs caused when the inmate threw the metal chair at him. He is at home recovering as well.

Martin was committed to CDCR on July 22, 1999, from San Diego County with an 11-year sentence for assault with a deadly weapon on a peace officer. He suffered injuries to his right fist and was treated at the prison.

The incident is being investigated by the prison’s Investigative Services Unit and will be referred to the Imperial County District Attorney’s Office.

Facility D, where the incident occurred, is under a modified program that limits inmate movement to absolutely necessary travel such as trips to the infirmary, law library and the showers as prison officials investigate the cause of the attack.

The prison opened in 1992 and houses 3,707 inmates, 1,700 of whom are serving life and 594 serving life without the possibility of parole. There are 1,280 people employed at the prison.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 14, 2013
CONTACT: Lt. Everardo Silva
(760) 604-1618

Friday, October 11, 2013

Inmate Death at California State Prison-Corcoran Investigated as a Homicide

CORCORAN – Investigators at California State Prison-Corcoran (CSP-Corcoran) and the Kings County District Attorney’s Office are investigating the death of a 48-year-old inmate as a homicide.  Today at 12:36 p.m., staff found the inmate unresponsive in his Security Housing Unit cell. He was pronounced dead at 1:02 p.m.

The deceased inmate, admitted from Alameda County on October 24, 2011, was serving a 17-year sentence for first-degree burglary with priors. His name is being withheld pending next-of-kin notification.

The inmate’s cellmate, Tyrone Robinson, 49, has been identified as the suspect.

Robinson, admitted from Alameda County on December 9, 1991, is serving 32-years-to-life for several convictions including first-degree murder and robbery.

The Kings County Coroner will perform an autopsy.

The Office of the Inspector General’s Bureau of Independent Review was notified.

CSP-Corcoran opened in 1988 and houses 4,399 minimum-, medium-, maximum- and high-security custody inmates. The Kings County prison offers academic classes and vocational programs as well as community programs and work crews. The prison employs approximately 2,300 people.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
OCTOBER 11, 2013
CONTACT: MARY KIMBRELL
(559) 992-6174

Monday, October 7, 2013

Condemned Inmate Timothy Michael Russell’s Death Investigated as a Suicide

SAN QUENTIN – Condemned inmate Timothy Russell, 53, who was on California’s death row from Riverside County, was found unresponsive in his cell late Friday evening in San Quentin State Prison.  Subsequently, he was pronounced dead at the prison at 12:48 a.m., on October 5, 2013. The death is being investigated as a suicide.  Russell was single-celled.

Russell was sentenced to death on January 8, 1999, by a Riverside County jury for the January 5, 1997, ambush slaying of Riverside County Sheriff's Deputies, James Lehmann Jr., 41, of Apple Valley, and Michael Haugen, 33, of San Jacinto, outside Russell's residence in a remote desert area of Whitewater, an unincorporated area of the county.  Russell had been on death row since January 14, 1999.

Since 1978 when California reinstated capital punishment, 60 condemned inmates have died from natural causes, 22 have committed suicide, 13 have been executed in California, one was executed in Missouri, six have died from other causes, and one cause is pending. There are 741 offenders on California’s death row.


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For Immediate Release
October 7, 2013
Contact: Lt. Sam Robinson
(415) 455-5008


Friday, October 4, 2013

Salinas Valley State Prison Homicide Under Investigation

SOLEDAD – Salinas Valley State Prison (SVSP) officials are investigating the death of an inmate as a homicide after he was found unresponsive in his cell on Friday, October 4, 2013.

The victim, age 31, whose name is being withheld pending next-of-kin notification, was pronounced dead at the institution at 11:15 a.m. today from apparent blunt force trauma to the head.

The inmate victim was received from Santa Clara County on August 17, 2011, with a 7-year sentence for carjacking. He was a second-strike offender who had served a 2-year term from Santa Clara County in 2006 for assault with force causing great bodily injury.

Prison officials have identified inmate Brandon Scott Keen, 28, as the suspect in the case. He has been placed in the Administrative Segregation Unit pending the investigation.

Inmate Keen was received from Riverside County on April 4, 2013, with a 26-year term for mayhem and assault with a deadly weapon. Inmate Keen is also a second-strike offender who served a prior prison term from Riverside County in 2008 for arson.

Salinas Valley State Prison opened in May 1996, is located on approximately 300 acres in Monterey County, and houses approximately 3,500 inmates. The institution’s mission is to provide long-term housing for both minimum- and maximum-custody male inmates.

For more information about SVSP, visit CDCR’s website at www.cdcr.ca.gov.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE               
October 4, 2013                                      
Contact: Lt. Darren Chamberlain
(831) 678-5554

In-custody Homicide Under Investigation

CORCORAN – Investigators at the California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison in Corcoran (CSATF) and the Kings County District Attorney’s Office are investigating a September 20, 2013, stabbing assault incident as a homicide.

Inmate William Salazar, 36, is the suspect in the murder of inmate Lawrence Lozano, 34, who succumbed to the wounds he suffered on September 20 and was pronounced dead on October 3, 2013 at 10:27 p.m.

Lozano was committed from Los Angeles County on November 16, 2000, with a 35-year sentence for lewd and lascivious acts with a child under 14 with force and violence.

Inmate Salazar was committed from San Bernardino County on July 2, 2002 with a life sentence for second-degree murder. He was re-housed in the Administrative Segregation Unit pending the homicide investigation.

The Kings County Coroner will conduct an autopsy.

CSATF houses minimum-, medium- and maximum-security male inmates. The prison opened in Kings County in 1997, houses 5,787 inmates and employs approximately 1,900 people.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 4, 2013
(559) 992-7154
Contact: Lupe Cartagena

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

CDCR Investigators Track Down Escapee From 1977

SACRAMENTO – Michael R. Morrow, 70, who escaped from a California state prison in 1977, was apprehended on September 23 in Garland County, Arkansas, said the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR).

CDCR’s Special Service Unit, assisted by the department’s Criminal Intelligence and Analysis Unit, developed new leads in the 36-year-old case. Morrow had been using the alias Carl Frank Wilson and agents located his whereabouts in Arkansas.

CDCR agents requested an Unlawful Flight to Avoid Confinement warrant from federal authorities. The FBI in Little Rock, Arkansas, and the Garland County Sheriff’s Department arrested Morrow without incident at a residence in Jessieville, Arkansas.

Morrow had escaped from California Institution for Men in Chino on August 27, 1977. He was four years into a five-years-to-life sentence from Los Angeles County for two counts of first-degree robbery with the use of a firearm.

Morrow is currently in the Garland County Jail. CDCR has begun the process to extradite Morrow back to its custody to finish serving his sentence. CDCR will also refer the case to the San Bernardino County District Attorney’s Office.

Between 1977 and 2012, 98.5 percent of all CDCR escapees have been apprehended.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 25, 2013
Contact: Terry Thornton
(916) 445-4950



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Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Walkaways from California State Prison-Corcoran Captured in Oxnard


Minimum-security inmates arrested without incident

Oxnard, CA - Special Service Unit agents from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s Office of Correctional Safety (OCS) in cooperation with the Ventura County Sheriff’s Department apprehended minimum-security walkaways Alejandro Flores and Isidro Sanchez on Saturday, September 21, 2013 at 3:15 a.m. Both were later returned to California State Prison (CSP)-Corcoran.

Flores and Sanchez had walked away from the minimum-security Prison Industry Authority dairy at CSP-Corcoran Sunday, September 15, 2013 at approximately 9:30 p.m. Institutional staff immediately notified local law enforcement and OCS. A search was initiated and continued until the inmates' capture on Saturday.

Since 1977, 98.7 percent of all CDCR escapees and walkaways have been apprehended.

CSP-Corcoran opened in 1988 and houses nearly 4,400 minimum-, medium-, maximum- and high-security custody inmates. The Kings County prison offers academic classes and vocational programs as well as community programs and work crews. The prison employs approximately 2,100 people.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 24, 2013
Contact: Lt. Anthony Baer
(559) 992-6104

Thursday, September 19, 2013

CDCR, Caltrans Expand Parolee Work Program

Roadside clean-up crews learn work skills, save tax dollars

FRESNO - A joint program between the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) and Caltrans that helps parolees cultivate job skills is expanding to Los Angeles, Fresno, Stockton and San Bernardino.

This year, the Caltrans Work Crew program will give 136 parolees an opportunity to earn a wage cleaning up roadside litter and to learn basic skills that will help them make a successful return to their communities. The work crew program has been running in Sacramento and the Bay Area for the last five years.

“This program is about a lot more than picking up trash,” said Colleen Curtin, CDCR Chief of Reentry and Community Services.  “Many parolees have never had a regular job, and they learn skills that many of us take for granted, such as the reward of earning a wage, the discipline of being on time, the teamwork to get a job done working with other people, and the motivation to come back at 6 a.m. the next day and do it all over again.”

Curtin noted that parolees on the work crews, who are paid $10 per hour, save taxpayers money that Caltrans can use for highway maintenance or construction.  The program also reduces recidivism, breaking the cycle of repeat crime, which also saves tax dollars. 

Parolees are selected for the program only after a review of their criminal history and an assessment of their willingness to do the job.  Those who are chosen receive safety training to prepare them for working adjacent to traffic, and to avoid injury and roadside hazards that can range from toxic material to wasp nests.

The litter-abatement program began as a pilot in Sacramento in 2009. Since then, 697 parolees have worked there, 70 percent of them going on to get part- or full-time employment, or to attend college or vocational programs full time. The City of Oakland’s Golden State Works Program, which has operated since 2011, has enrolled 302 parolees, 87 of whom have moved on to full time employment.

Statewide, Caltrans spends $52 million a year on litter removal. Enough trash is collected from roadsides to fill more than 10,000 garbage trucks. Parked end-to-end, those trucks would stretch more than 50 miles.

For Immediate Release
September 19, 2013
Contact:  Bill Sessa
(916) 445-4950



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Wednesday, September 18, 2013

CDCR and L.A. County Sign Contract to Allow County Jail to House Inmates in State Fire Camps

Utilizing inmates in camps will ease L.A.County’s jail population and improve prospects for inmate rehabilitation

LOS ANGELES – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) and the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors finalized a contract Tuesday that allows the county to house more than 500 jail inmates in CDCR firefighting camps.

“This agreement is a great example of the state working with counties to protect public safety,” CDCR Secretary Jeff Beard said. “This partnership will continue to allow us to provide fire protection during what has been one of the most destructive fire seasons in state history while at the same time rehabilitating lower level offenders.”

The contract allows Los Angeles County to ease its jail population and ensures enough able-bodied inmates are available to help with fire suppression and in other emergencies, such as floods and earthquakes. Only low-level offenders may participate in such programs.  Under the law, offenders convicted after October 1, 2011 of non-serious, non-violent, and non-sex crimes stay in county jail to serve their sentence.  The low-level inmates that will be housed in the camps will be trained to work with state firefighters.

The $27-million, three-year deal will send 528 county inmates serving long-term sentences to five fire camps throughout the county.  The camps are jointly operated with the state prison system and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Prevention (CALFIRE).  This cost covers housing/supervision costs by CDCR as well as the inmate training costs by CAL FIRE.

CDCR jointly manages 39 adult and juvenile camps with CAL FIRE and five adult camps with the Los Angeles County Fire Department. Approximately 3,800 offenders currently participate in the Conservation Camps Program. In an average year, the fire crews provide more than 2.5 million hours of emergency response work and save the state more than $100 million annually. The crews are available year-round, and have helped to contain and mitigate all of California’s major disasters since 1946, including wildfires, floods, heavy snows, search and rescue operations, and earthquakes.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 17, 2013    
Contact: Jonathan Parsley 
(916) 445-4950

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Inmate Death at Kern Valley State Prison Being Investigated as a Homicide

DELANO – Officials at Kern Valley State Prison (KVSP) are investigating the death of an inmate as a homicide after he was found unresponsive in his cell.

Inmate Steven Brenneman, 40, was pronounced dead at 2:14 p.m. Preliminary reports indicate inmate Brenneman died from blunt force trauma to the head.

Prison officials have named inmate Brenneman’s cellmate, Inmate Walter Tamayo, 40, as a suspect in the case. Inmate Tamayo has been placed in Administrative Segregation pending an investigation by KVSP investigators, the Kern County Coroner and the Kern County District Attorney.

Inmate Brenneman, was serving an 18-year sentence from Riverside County for rape with force and violence and penetration with a foreign object.

Inmate Tamayo, is currently serving a life sentence from Los Angeles County for first-degree murder and attempted first-degree murder.

KVSP opened in 2005 and houses 3,782 minimum-, medium-, maximum-, and high-security custody inmates.  KVSP offers academic classes and vocational programs and employs approximately 1,800 people.

For more information about KVSP, visit CDCR’s website at www.cdcr.ca.gov.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 17, 2013
CONTACT: Jeff Smith
(661) 721-6314

Monday, September 16, 2013

Minimum Security Inmates Missing from CSP-Corcoran


CORCORAN, CA - On Sunday, September 15, 2013 at approximately 9:30 p.m. two Level I (Minimum Custody) inmates assigned to work at the Dairy (which is outside of the electrical fence perimeter) were discovered missing.  Inmates Alejandro Flores and Isidro Sanchez were last seen at approximately 7:30 p.m. during an informal count at their job site.

Inmate Flores is a Hispanic inmate with a medium build, dark complexion, brown eyes and brown hair.  He was last seen wearing a white jumpsuit with “CDCR Prisoner” printed on the clothing.  Flores is 27 years old, 5’ 6” and weighs 138 pounds.  He is serving a five-year sentence for Second-degree Robbery.  He was scheduled to parole in July 2016.

Inmate Sanchez is a Hispanic inmate with medium build, light complexion, brown eyes and brown hair.  He was last seen wearing a white jumpsuit with “CDCR Prisoner” printed on the clothing.  Sanchez is 36 years old, 5’ 6” and weighs 172 pounds.  He is serving a two-year sentence for Possession of Marijuana for Sale. Sanchez was scheduled to parole in November 2013.

Prison officials are continuing the search for inmates Flores and Sanchez, and local law-enforcement agencies have been notified.  If anyone sees the inmates, or knows of their whereabouts, please notify local law enforcement officials and California State Prison Corcoran at (559) 992-6120, or call 9-1-1.

CSP-Corcoran opened in 1988 and currently houses approximately 4,300 minimum-, medium-, maximum- and high-security custody inmates.  The Kings County prison offers academic classes and vocational programs as well as community programs and work crews.  The prison employs approximately 2,100 people.




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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 16, 2013
Contact: Lt. Anthony Baer
(559) 992-6104

Senate Confirms Two Top CDCR Executive Appointments

SACRAMENTO — The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today announced that the California State Senate has confirmed Dan Stone as the Director of Adult Parole Operations and Jay Virbel as Associate Director of Female Offender Programs, Services and Special Housing.

“During these times of unprecedented public safety changes, both within our prisons and out, CDCR must have strong leadership,” CDCR Secretary Beard said. “Both men have shown great dedication and I am looking forward to working together to make California’s prison system a model for the country.” 

Stone, 49, of Folsom, has served as Director of the Division of Adult Parole Operations since being appointed by Governor Brown on November 13, 2012.  Since being appointed, Stone has continued to implement public safety realignment.  He has overseen the transition of the revocation process to the county courts, and has worked to expand offender reentry programs.  Stone was confirmed by the California Senate with a bipartisan vote 36-0.  He has served in multiple positions within CDCR since 1987, including Regional Parole Administrator, Associate Director, Parole Administrator, Parole Agent I, II and III, at the Division of Adult Parole Operations, and Correctional Counselor, Correction Sergeant, and Correctional Officer within the Division of Adult Institutions.  

Virbel, 46, of Sacramento has served as Associate Director of Female Offender Programs, Services and Special Housing since being appointed by Governor Brown on September 26, 2012. He has served in multiple positions within CDCR since 1993, including chief deputy of program operations and chief of investigations at the Board of Parole Hearings and senior special agent and special agent in the Office of Internal Affairs. He also served as assistant deputy director, correctional lieutenant, sergeant and officer for the Division of Adult Institutions. Virbel was confirmed by the State Senate with a bipartisan vote 38-0.

CDCR is California's correctional agency, consisting of the Division of Adult Operations, the Division of Adult Programs and the Division of Juvenile Justice. Additionally, CDCR oversees the functions of the Board of Parole Hearings, the Commission on Juvenile Justice, the Council on Mentally Ill Offenders, the Prison Industry Authority Board, the Council for Interstate Adult Offender Supervision, and the Joint Venture Policy Advisory Board.

CDCR consists of 34 adult prisons, 45 conservation camps, and three youth facilities, as well as various boards and commissions. CDCR has approximately 41,500 employees, houses 119,837 inmates, and supervises 51,267 parolees.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 16, 2013
Contact: (916) 445-4950

Friday, September 13, 2013

Inmate Walkaway Apprehended, Returned to North Kern Prison

KERN – On September 12, 2013, at approximately 1:30 am, officials at North Kern State Prison (NKSP) received information that inmate Michael Valdez, 27, who had walked away from the institution’s minimum support facility on September 1, was apprehended and in police custody.

Valdez was arrested by the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department in Lynwood, California. He was later transferred to NKSP.

Inmate Valdez was serving a two-year sentence for Possession of a Controlled Substance from Los Angeles in January 2013. 

NKSP opened in April 1993, houses approximately 4600 inmates and is located in Delano Ca. NKSP has a two-fold mission. First, it functions as a reception center for the processing of incoming inmates from southern and northern counties. Secondly, it functions as the Central California Transportation Hub for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.



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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 13, 2013
Contact: Lt. George Becerra
(661)721-2345 x5006     

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Governor, Legislative Leaders Reach Agreement on Prison Plan

SACRAMENTO – Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. and legislative leaders today agreed on amendments to SB 105 that allow the state to comply with a federal court order to limit the prison population to 137.5 percent of capacity, avoid the early release of thousands of prisoners and protect public safety.

While the legislation provides an immediate path to compliance, it reflects the state’s preference that the court modify its order to provide the state additional time to continue to develop and implement a more balanced and cost-effective prison policy.

As amended, SB 105:

• Authorizes up to $315 million in immediate in-state and out-of-state capacity.
• Lays the foundation for longer-term changes to the criminal justice system, in collaboration with the Legislature and stakeholders.
• Strengthens existing local efforts (SB 678) to manage offenders by increasing the amount of funding that county probation departments receive if they can serve felony probationers locally and keep them from coming to prison.
• Requires that if the court modifies the order in a way that reduces the cost of compliance, the first $75 million in savings will go to reducing recidivism.

The audio of today’s media availability with Governor Brown and Senate President Pro tem Darrell Steinberg, Assembly Speaker John A. PĂ©rez, Senate Republican Leader Bob Huff and Assembly Republican Leader Connie Conway is here. The bill language submitted today to the Office of Legislative Counsel is here.

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FOR ADVISORY PURPOSES ONLY
September 9, 2013

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

CDCR Inmate Firefighter Hospitalized During Mt. Diablo Blaze

SACRAMENTO – A California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) inmate was hospitalized yesterday due to heat exhaustion suffered while fighting the Mount Diablo wildfire.

 “Because of the rough terrain, the inmate had to be airlifted by helicopter to an ambulance for transport to a local hospital for treatment,” said Lt. Lawrence Rodriguez of the Salt Creek Conservation Camp where the inmate is based. 

The inmate was treated for heat exhaustion and severe dehydration. Fortunately, due to the quick reactions of the inmate fighting crew, the victim was able to recover quickly and was returned to the camp by 9:30 p.m.

CDCR has deployed nearly 450 youth and adult firefighters and department staff to help combat the wildfire burning in the Mount Diablo canyons. Another 1,215 inmates are currently battling blazes elsewhere in the state.

Since 1946, CDCR’s Conservation Camp Program has provided California with a well-trained, well-equipped work force for fire suppression.  More than 4,000 male and female inmates (200 fire crews) participate in the program annually.  The crews respond to nearly every type of emergency, including wildfires, floods, search-and-rescue operations and earthquakes.  They also log millions of hours annually on fire-reduction and conservation projects and provide forest, range and watershed enhancement on public lands. Their work saves the state hundreds of millions of dollars every year.

CDCR jointly manages 38 adult and juvenile camps with CAL FIRE and five adult camps with the Los Angeles County Fire Department.  Only minimum-custody inmates may participate in the program.  They must be physically fit and have no history of sex offenses, kidnapping, arson or escape.  Offenders earn their way into camp placement and must be free of major rules infractions.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
SEPTEMBER 10, 2013
CONTACT: Lt. Lawrence Rodriguez (916) 806-0660
OR Jonathan Parsley (916) 445-4950





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Thursday, September 5, 2013

CDCR Secretary Jeff Beard Issues Statement on End of Hunger Strike

SACRAMENTO— As of this morning, all participants of the prison hunger strike have started taking state-issued meals or have otherwise begun the process of re-feeding. California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Secretary Jeff Beard issued the following statement today regarding the end of the strike:

“We are pleased this dangerous strike has been called off before any inmates became seriously ill. I’d like to commend my staff and the staff with the federal Receiver’s Office for working together to ensure the health and safety of all employees and inmates was a top priority. CDCR will continue to implement the substantive reforms in California’s Security Housing Units that we initiated two years ago.”

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Tuesday, September 3, 2013

North Kern State Prison Escapee

DELANO – An inmate assigned to North Kern State Prison (NKSP) Minimum Support Facility was discovered missing by custody staff on September 1, 2013, at approximately 5:00 p.m.  Inmate Michael Valdez, a minimum-custody inmate, could not be located by custody staff during an Institutional Count.  Escape procedures were immediately activated.

Inmate Valdez was serving a two-year sentence for Possession of a Controlled Substance from Los Angeles in January 2013.  Valdez is described as a 27-year-old Hispanic male with a bald head, brown eyes and weighing approximately 160 pounds. 

Kern County law enforcement agencies and surrounding residents have been notified.

Anyone with information on Valdez’s whereabouts or who sees him is urged to notify local authorities or North Kern State Prison, or call 911.

NKSP opened in April 1993, houses approximately 4600 inmates and is located in Delano Ca. NKSP has a two-fold mission. First, it functions as a reception center for the processing of incoming inmates from southern and northern counties. Secondly, it functions as the Central California Transportation Hub for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. 
 
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
SEPTEMBER 2, 2013
CONTACT:  LT. GEORGE BECERRA
(661)721-2345

Thursday, August 29, 2013

CDCR Honors Employees at 29th Annual Medal of Valor Ceremony

Department recognizes more than 100 employees for heroism, outstanding service

SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) honored 116 employees today during the department’s annual Medal of Valor Ceremony. Employees were recognized for extraordinary bravery and conduct above and beyond the call of duty, often in life-saving incidents where public safety was at risk.


“CDCR employees statewide are committed to protecting public safety,” said CDCR Secretary Jeff Beard. “Today we are honoring the bravery and performance that goes well above the call of duty. These dedicated employees gave of themselves, and some even placed their own lives in jeopardy to save another.”

Awards were presented by Secretary Beard and senior department executives at the 29th annual ceremony, which was sponsored by the California Correctional Supervisors Organization.

In many instances, the recipients saved the life of other employees, inmates or private citizens as they responded to emergencies. Among the actions recognized by the awards were quick responses that saved the lives of traffic-accident victims and actions by a parole agent that saved the life of a wounded fellow agent. Also honored was the distinguished service of men and women to CDCR over a period of time.


The awards presented ranged from the Distinguished Service Award to the Gold Star.  For the second year, Employee of the Year awards were presented by various divisions within CDCR.
A complete list of 2013 award winners follows:

GOLD STAR MEDAL

The Corrections Star (Gold) medal is the department’s second-highest award for heroic deeds under extraordinary circumstances. The employee shall display courage in the face of immediate peril in acting to save the life of another person.

Correctional Officer Jason Parkhurst, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Charles Contreras, California Correctional Institution


Parole Agent I Henrik Agasyan, California Parole Apprehension Team, Los Angeles

SILVER STAR MEDAL

The Corrections Star (Silver) medal is the department’s third-highest award for acts of bravery under extraordinary or unusual circumstances. The employee shall display courage in the face of potential peril while saving or attempting to save the life of another person or distinguish themselves by performing in stressful situations with exceptional tactics or judgment.

Correctional Officer Angela Hazewood, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Officer Jeff Gold, Mule Creek State Prison


Correctional Officer Joann Burnias, California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility/
State Prison, Corcoran


Correctional Counselor Martin Hernandez, California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility/ State Prison, Corcoran


Special Agent Steve Epperson, Office of Correctional Safety, Special Service Unit, San Diego


Correctional Lieutenant Christopher Paris, Office of Correctional Safety, Headquarters


Correctional Lieutenant Cris Caldwell, Office of Correctional Safety, Headquarters

BRONZE STAR MEDAL

The Corrections Star (Bronze) is the department’s award for saving a life without placing oneself in peril. The employee shall have used proper training and tactics in a professional manner to save, or clearly contribute to saving, the life of another person.

Correctional Lieutenant Harold Hughes, Sierra Conservation Center


Parole Agent I Michael Williams, Oakland Parole Unit #2


Correctional Sergeant Anthony Morales, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Thomas Quezada, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Officer Jason Murillo, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Sergeant Charles Finnegan, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Sergeant Larry Holloway, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Officer Haydel Mitchell, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Sergeant Larry Dotterman, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Mario Alonzo, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Cresencio Alpuche, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Fire Captain Mark Del Barba, Deuel Vocational Institution


Parole Agent I Bartolo Siino, Parole Region I, Hanford Unit


Correctional Officer Sandra Copeland, California Correctional Institution


DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL

The Distinguished Service Medal is for an employee’s exemplary work conduct with the department for a period of months or years, or involvement in a specific assignment of unusual benefit to the Department.

 
Dr. Timothy McCarthy, Chief of Mental Health, Pelican Bay State Prison (Posthumously)


Dr. Elaina Jannell, Psychologist, California State Prison, Solano


Dr. Steven Sherman, Clinical Psychologist, N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility


Parole Agent I Roger Gold, Redwood City Parole Unit


Parole Agent III Gregory Weber, Redwood City Parole Unit


Correctional Lieutenant Tom Langford, Folsom State Prison


Parole Agent I Beth Bowens, O.H. Close Youth Correctional Facility


Special Agent Karen Mory, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Special Agent Brian Docherty, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Special Agent John Castanedo, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Special Agent Jeff Faust, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Special Agent Steve Gutierrez, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Special Agent Jason Marks, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Special Agent Guillermo Moreno, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Office Technician Gener Santiago, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Parole Agent II Gordon Lee, Redwood City Parole Unit


UNIT CITATION


The Unit Citation is for great courage displayed by a departmental unit in the course of conducting an operation in the face of immediate life-threatening circumstances.

 
Correctional Officer Gabriel Aguilar, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Officer Joseph Bailey, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Officer Angela Hazewood, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Officer Marsell Johnson, California State Prison, Sacramento
Correctional Officer Michael Platt, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Edward Shew, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Daniel Torres, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Michael Rivera, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Michael Smith, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Saul Lopez, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Monica Milke, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Eddie Nunez, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Hugh McFarlane, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer David Morales, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Scott Patterson, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Juan Garcia, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Tyler Healy, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Todd Levesque, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Adam Garvey, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Rick Jones, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer David Linch, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Paul Birdsong, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Larry Dotterman, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Michael Foster, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Reginald Burks, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Dennis Duffield, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Mark Aguilar, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Mario Alonzo, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Rodolfo Alaniz, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Felipe Alvarez, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Lieutenant Michael Calhoun, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Gary Turner III, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Stacie Henley, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Harold Weaver, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Bobby Wheeler, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Charles Hougland, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Kenneth Harper, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Richard Kemp, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Counselor I Dave Tamplen, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Oscar Smith, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Ricardo Cisneros, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer James Whittaker, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Garrett Giessner, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Jeff Ammon, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Troy Parker, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Terry Barron, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Jim Herring, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Bryan Jeanes, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Johnny Lee, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Gary Lowry, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Christopher Nason, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Cheryl Nichols, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Michael Oatman, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Darrel Ulbricht, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Brian Von Rader, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Joseph White, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Jason Harrell, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Cal Huskey, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Merle Murchison, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Robert Rivera, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Dennis Ruble, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Greg Watkins, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Scott Proffer, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer James Kline, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Bobby Lee, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Steven Wood, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Diana Oliva, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Shayna Robertson, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Fallon Shelton, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Devon Rainwater, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Anthony Pickens, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Evan Zahniser, High Desert State Prison


EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR AWARDS


ADMINISTRATOR OF THE YEAR


Sirisha Gullapalli, Senior Information Systems Analyst, Enterprise Information Services


MEDICAL/DENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONAL OF THE YEAR


Dr. Gregory Tarasoff, Chief Psychiatrist, San Quentin State Prison


REHABILITATION PROFESSIONAL OF THE YEAR


Carlos Ramirez, Correctional Counselor III, California Institution for Men


DIVISION OF JUVENILE JUSTICE OFFICER OF THE YEAR


Quincy Elloie, Treatment Team Supervisor, O.H. Close Youth Correctional Facility


CORRECTIONAL SUPERVISOR OF THE YEAR

Sergeant Elijah Caron, California State Prison, Sacramento

CORRECTIONAL PEACE OFFICER OF THE YEAR

Correctional Officer Eli Davis, Chuckawalla Valley State Prison


EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR


Warden Ronald Rackley, California Health Care Facility, Stockton


For Immediate Release
August 29, 2013
Contact Jeffrey Callison or
Terry Thornton
(916) 445-4950




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