Monday, July 29, 2013

Mass Hunger Strike Update

SACRAMENTO – As of today, 561 inmates in nine state prisons are on a mass hunger strike disturbance, down from 12,421 inmates on July 11, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). An inmate is considered to be on a hunger strike after he has missed nine consecutive meals.

A total of 385 inmates have been on a mass hunger strike continuously since July 8.

CDCR is also releasing additional information on the death of California State Prison-Corcoran (CSP-Corcoran) inmate Billy Michael Sell, 32, following inaccurate and misleading statements from hunger strike advocates about the circumstances of his death.

The Kings County Sheriff’s Department Office of the Coroner conducted an autopsy and preliminarily ruled his death was a suicide from strangulation; CSP-Corcoran investigators have not found any evidence his suicide was related to his previous participation in the mass hunger strike.

Inmate Sell was admitted on May 28, 1999 from San Luis Obispo County (not Solano County as initially reported) with a life sentence for attempted first-degree murder. He began serving another life sentence consecutively from Sacramento County on June 2, 2006 for aggravated assault by someone serving a life sentence. Inmate Sell was being prosecuted and facing the death penalty in Kings County for the December 16, 2007 murder of his 21-year-old cellmate Reuben Quesada Galasso, who had been stabbed with an inmate-made weapon and strangled to death.

On July 22, CSP-Corcoran officers conducting their 30-minute welfare checks in the Security Housing Unit found inmate Sell unresponsive. He was pronounced dead in the prison’s hospital at 9:32 p.m. Sell was single-celled.

CDCR conducts 30-minute welfare checks not just for inmates on suicide watch, but all inmates in Security Housing Units, Psychiatric Services Units and Administrative Segregation Units. The purpose of the staggered and unpredictable welfare checks is to limit the opportunity an inmate has to commit acts of self-harm and is consistent with American Correctional Association standards.

Inmate Sell was documented as participating in the mass hunger strike when he missed nine consecutive meals on July 11 and was removed from the list when he resumed eating July 21.

In addition to CDCR’s ongoing investigation, the federal Receiver’s staff also investigates all deaths in custody.

CDCR is also investigating the July 27 incident in which a CSP-Corcoran inmate was assaulted by his cellmate because he refused to share food items with other inmates participating in the mass hunger strike. The inmate victim was taken to an outside hospital for treatment of facial fractures. He is expected to be returned to the prison today.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 29, 2013
Contact: Terry Thornton or
Jeffrey Callison
(916) 445-4950

Mental Health Treatment Building at California State Prison- Sacramento Receives Energy Award


Design significantly reduces consumption, increases sustainability

SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today announced a new mental health treatment building at California State Prison-Sacramento (SAC) has received top energy conservation and sustainability certification by the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED).

The mental health treatment facility at SAC, which included 16,700 square feet of renovated space, received LEED “Silver” certification for Commercial Interiors.

“I am very proud that CDCR continues to demonstrate leadership in energy and water conservation,” CDCR Secretary Jeff Beard said. “We have made significant strides in sustainable construction and look forward to more of our projects being recognized for their energy-efficiency.”

The new treatment and office space provides a place for CDCR to conduct enhanced outpatient (EOP) mental health treatment for general population inmates. It is one of eight new facilities CDCR has built at various institutions to provide treatment to mentally ill inmates.

Throughout the design and construction of this project, CDCR focused on improving the indoor environment and air quality. Only low-emitting paints and adhesives were used and ongoing access to outside air was emphasized for building occupants. Emphasis was placed on energy and water conservation, as well as on reducing construction waste. The building minimizes energy consumption by reducing lighting power density by more than 25 percent and incorporates efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. Energy Star appliances were included in the project and low-flow plumbing fixtures will reduce water consumption by more than 39 percent.

By preserving and reusing an existing building and incorporating recycled and regional materials whenever possible, the project’s impact on critical natural resources was also significantly reduced. More than 97 percent of the waste generated during construction and demolition was recycled.

A LEED criterion for a “Silver” award requires building characteristics that promote occupant well-being and reduces the building’s environmental impacts.  CDCR has previously received four LEED Silver certifications for newly constructed projects.

The United States Green Building Council (USGBC) confers LEED awards based on its review of a project’s sustainability attributes. In addition to the LEED awards already received by CDCR, two additional projects constructed by CDCR are pending certification, the new EOP Office and Treatment building at California Medical Facility in Vacaville and the new Administrative Segregation Unit EOP Office and Treatment building at California State Prison, Los Angeles County in Lancaster.

The LEED green building rating system was developed and administered by the U.S. Green Building Council, a Washington, D.C.-based, nonprofit coalition of building industry leaders. The certification program is the nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction and operation of high-performance green buildings. LEED promotes a whole-building approach to sustainability by recognizing performance in five key areas: sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection and indoor environmental quality and gives building owners and operators the tools they need to have an immediate and measurable impact on their buildings' performance.

In April 2012, Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. issued Executive Order B-18-12 directing all state agencies to take actions to reduce entity-wide greenhouse gas emissions by at least 10 percent by 2015 and 20 percent by 2020, as measured against a 2010 baseline.

The project team included CDCR, Kitchell CEM, Nacht & Lewis Architects, CYS Structural Engineers, Capital Engineering, AVS Engineers, Carlton Engineering and was constructed by the Inmate Ward Labor program of CDCR. Green Building Services assisted the project team with establishing the sustainability objectives and the LEED certification process.

Link to CDCR’s Energy Savings Website: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/CDCR_Going_Green/Energy_Savings.html
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 29, 2013
Contact: Dana Simas
(916) 445-4950

Inmate Death at Mule Creek State Prison Under Investigation

IONE– Investigators at Mule Creek State Prison (MCSP) and the Amador County District Attorney’s Office are investigating the death of an inmate as a possible homicide due to injuries received during an apparent in-cell disturbance on Friday.

Inmate Thomas Hurst, 43, was pronounced dead on July 26, 2013, at a local outside area hospital.

Prison officials have named his cellmate, Clyde Aikens Jr, 25, as a suspect in the case.

The victim, Thomas Hurst, was received by California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on October 7, 2010 from Lake County to serve a seven-year, four-month sentence for ex-felon in possession of ammunition.

The suspect, Clyde Aikens was received by CDCR on February 11, 2008 from Alameda County to serve a 15-year sentence for carjacking with the use of a firearm.

The cause of death has not yet been determined.  The Office of the Inspector General has been notified.

Mule Creek State Prison, which opened in 1987, houses approximately 2800 minimum- to medium- and maximum-custody inmates.  The prison, located in Amador County, provides educational, medical and mental health services and employs more than 1,400 people.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 29, 2013
Contact: James P. Hernandez
(209) 274-5080

Wednesday, July 24, 2013

CDCR Dedicates New Mental Health Facility in Corcoran

SACRAMENTO –The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today dedicated a newly constructed mental health treatment facility at Corcoran State Prison, the latest addition to the department’s $2 billion expansion of medical and mental health facilities to meet court-ordered improvements in the quality of care provided to inmates. Approximately 34,000 prison inmates, or about 25% of California’s total prison population, require some form of mental health treatment.

“This project is just the most recent investment CDCR has made to continue providing quality medical and mental health care to California inmates,” said Dr. Diana Toche, CDCR Undersecretary for Administration and Offender Services. “Most mentally ill inmates will eventually be released from prison and so treatment ultimately makes our communities safer.”

The two-story, 14,932 square foot building, one of seven new mental health facilities constructed by CDCR, will house rooms for group and individual counseling sessions, recreational therapy and treatment, in addition to offices for clinical professional staff.

The new facility is one of 65 projects involving the expansion or construction of new facilities within CDCR’s 34 prisons to improve medical, mental health and dental care in recent years. The largest of those, the California Health Care Facility, a 1.4 million square foot, $839 million medical and mental health complex, accepted the first of 1,722 inmate patients in Stockton this week and will provide acute care to the state’s sickest inmates that require long term care.

The new Corcoran facility is seeking Silver certification from the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for its environmental and energy-saving features. They include use of low-emitting paints to improve indoor air quality, solar panels and highly efficient heating and air conditioning units to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and features that increase natural light and conserve water. In addition, much of the excess construction material was recycled.

Approximately 75 Corcoran inmates helped to build the facility as they participated in a vocational training program that prepares them to work in the construction trades when they are released. During construction, 40 inmates earned certificates for operation of heavy equipment, welding, hazmat awareness and other construction skills that will make them more employable, which reduces recidivism. # # #

CONTACT: Bill Sessa (916) 445-4950

Monday, July 22, 2013

CDCR Provides Update on Mass Hunger Strike Disturbance

SACRAMENTO – As of today, 986 inmates in 11 state prisons are on a mass hunger strike disturbance, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). An inmate is considered to be on a hunger strike after he has missed nine consecutive meals. Today, 42 inmates in one state prison refused to participate in their work assignments.

Participation in a mass disturbance and refusing to participate in a work assignment are violations of state law, and any participating inmates will receive disciplinary action in accordance with the California Code of Regulations, Title 15, Section 3323(h)(A) and Section 3323(f)(7).

Inmates identified as leading and perpetuating the disturbance are subject to disciplinary action in accordance with the California Code of Regulations, Title 15 Section 3315(a)(2)(L) and may be removed from the general population and be placed in an Administrative Segregation Unit pursuant to CDCR’s hunger strike policy.

CDCR does not condone inmate disturbances. Mass hunger strikes, work stoppages and other disruptions have the potential to impact programs, operations, staffing, safety and security.

CDCR is making every effort to maintain normal program operations for non-participating inmates; however, if normal programming is affected, CDCR will notify inmates and their families.

CDCR may need to take additional measures to effectively monitor and manage hunger strikers and their nutritional intake. CDCR is continuing to offer state-issued meals to all inmates.

CDCR has revised its gang validation and Security Housing Unit (SHU) confinement policies and procedures. The new revisions were implemented as a pilot program on October 18, 2012. The new comprehensive strategy supports CDCR’s goals of reducing long-term SHU confinement for offenders who do not engage in gang behavior.

The reforms place an emphasis on documented behavior, provide individual accountability of offenders, incorporate additional elements of due process to the validation system and provide a Step-Down Program as an alternative for offenders to demonstrate their commitment and willingness to refrain from criminal gang behavior. Moreover, gang associates – a majority of inmates housed in SHUs – are no longer placed in a SHU based solely upon their validation unless there is a corresponding confirmed disciplinary behavior at the time of the original validation.

Since last October, CDCR has conducted 382 case-by-case reviews of validated inmates housed indefinitely in SHUs. As of June 28, 208 inmates housed in SHUs have either been transferred or are approved for transfer to a general population facility and 115 inmates were placed in various phases of the Step-Down Program, an incentive-based, multi-step program that provides graduated housing, enhanced programs, interpersonal interactions and increased privileges for validated inmates who refrain from criminal gang behavior.

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The “Security Threat Group Identification, Prevention and Management Strategy” can be found at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/STG/

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 22, 2013
Contact: Jeffrey Callison
(916) 445-4950

Thursday, July 18, 2013

CDCR Provides Update on Mass Hunger Strike Disturbance

SACRAMENTO – As of today, 1,457 inmates in 15 state prisons are on a mass hunger strike disturbance, down from 12,421 inmates on July 11, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). An inmate is considered to be on a hunger strike after he has missed nine consecutive meals.

Today, 48 inmates in three state prisons refused to participate in their work assignments.

On July 16, 2,493 inmates were on a mass hunger strike and 201 had refused to go to work.

On July 17, 2,327 inmates were on a mass hunger strike; 229 had refused to go to work.

CDCR is not identifying how many inmates are or are not participating in specific prisons. The mass hunger strike is organized by prison gangs and publicizing participation levels at specific prisons could put inmates who are not participating in extreme danger.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JULY 18, 2013
CONTACT: TERRY THORNTON
(916) 445-4950


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Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Minimum-security inmate who walked away from Pelican Bay State Prison is apprehended

CRESCENT CITY – Pelican Bay State Prison’s Crisis Response Team apprehended inmate Tore Digirolamo, 44, on July 15 at approximately 7:30 p.m. Digirolamo had walked away from the prison’s Minimum Support Facility (MSF) earlier yesterday.

Pelican Bay administrators had initiated its escape apprehension procedures after the inmate was found missing from his assigned bunk in the MSF dorm.

The Del Norte County Sheriff’s Office, the California Highway Patrol, the Crescent City Police Department and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife helped Pelican Bay officers in the search for the missing inmate, who was found hiding in the nearby woods.

Digirolamo was received from Los Angeles County on July 7, 2011 with a four-year sentence for second-degree burglary.

He was returned to Pelican Bay without incident and was re-housed in the Administrative Segregation Unit. The Del Norte County District Attorney’s office was notified.

As of 2012 there have been 19,342 escapes from adult prisons, camps, and in-state contract beds since 1977. Of those escapes, 19,059 (98.5 percent) have been apprehended as of December 31, 2012.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JULY 16, 2013
CONTACT: LT. CHRISTOPHER ACOSTA
(707) 465-9040



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Monday, July 15, 2013

CDCR Updates Information on Mass Hunger Strike Disturbance

No incidents of violence reported

SACRAMENTO – As of today, 2,572 inmates in 17 state prisons are on a mass hunger strike disturbance, down from 12,421 inmates on July 11, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). An inmate is considered to be on a hunger strike after he has missed nine consecutive meals.

Today, 258 inmates refused to participate in their work assignments or attend educational classes.

On Saturday, July 13, 6,370 inmates were on a mass hunger strike and 714 had refused to go to work.

On Sunday, July 14, 4,487 inmates were on a mass hunger strike; 731 had refused to go to work.

CDCR is not identifying how many inmates are or are not participating in specific prisons. The mass hunger strike is organized by prison gangs and publicizing participation levels at specific prisons could put inmates who are not participating in extreme danger.

There have been no reports of violence or unrest related to this mass disturbance.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 15, 2013
Contact: Terry Thornton
(916) 445-4950

# # # #

Minimum-security inmate walks away from Pelican Bay State Prison

Crescent City – An inmate walked away from Pelican Bay State Prison’s Minimum Support Facility (MSF) this afternoon.

Inmate Tore Digirolamo, 44, was found missing from his assigned bunk in the MSF dorm.

Digirolamo is a white male with brown hair and brown eyes. He is 5’ 6” and weighs 193 pounds.

Digirolamo was received from Los Angeles County on July 7, 2011 with a four-year sentence for second-degree burglary.

Pelican Bay State Prison has initiated its escape apprehension procedures and is working with local law enforcement officials to apprehend the escapee. Anyone who may know the whereabouts of this inmate is asked to call (707) 465-1280 or call 911.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 15, 2013
CONTACT: Lt. Christopher Acosta
(707) 465-9040


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EEL RIVER CONSERVATION CAMP WALKAWAYS APPREHENDED

Redway, CA – Prison Inmates Dennis Rene Welch and Glen Martin Whiteside, both minimum security inmates who escaped from the Eel River Conservation Camp CC#31 in Redway, California were apprehended this afternoon in Santa Cruz, California.  Welch and Whiteside were taken into custody by Special Agents from the Richmond and Rancho Cordova Special Services Unit of the Office of Correctional Safety along with the Santa Cruz’s Sheriff’s Department.
 
At approximately 2 p.m., on July 14, 2013, the escapees were captured, arrested and taken into custody.  They were medically cleared and transported to Salinas Valley State Prison in Soledad, California without incident.  This matter will be referred to the Humboldt County District Attorney’s Office for prosecution.


Welch was serving a state prison sentence for Burglary 1st from Santa Cruz County and was scheduled to be paroled in January 2014.  Whiteside was serving a state prison sentence for Robbery 2nd from Sacramento County and was scheduled to be paroled December 2014.

Of all offenders who have escaped from an adult institution, camp or community-based program since 1977, 99.1 percent have been apprehended.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                        
July 14, 2013
Contact: Margaret Pieper                                                                                                    
530-257-2181 x4110

Friday, July 12, 2013

CDCR Updates Information on Mass Hunger Strike Disturbance

4,754 inmates discontinue their hunger strike since July 11

SACRAMENTO – As of today, 7,667 inmates in 24 state prisons and one out-of-state contract facility are on a mass hunger strike disturbance, down from 12,421 inmates on July 11, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). An inmate is considered to be on a hunger strike after he has missed nine consecutive meals.

Today, 1,196 inmates refused to participate in their work assignments or attend educational classes.

CDCR is not identifying how many inmates are or are not participating in specific prisons. The mass hunger strike is organized by prison gangs and publicizing participation levels at specific prisons could put inmates who are not participating in extreme danger.

Visiting at state prisons will not be impacted. Pre-approved visitors can use the Visitor Processing Appointment Scheduling System (VPASS), CDCR’s online visiting reservation system, to make or confirm a visit with their loved one or to be notified of any changes.

The Visitor Processing Appointment Scheduling System can be accessed at http://visitorreservations.cdcr.ca.gov/

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JULY 12, 2013
CONTACT: TERRY THORNTON
(916) 445-4950

Thursday, July 11, 2013

CDCR Releases Information on Mass Hunger Strike Disturbance

Hunger strikers could face disciplinary action under state law

SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) is responding to a mass hunger strike disturbance by thousands of inmates in several correctional facilities. As of today, 12,421 inmates in 24 state prisons and four out-of-state contract facilities have missed nine consecutive meals since Monday, July 8, 2013. An inmate is considered to be on a hunger strike after he has missed nine consecutive meals.

CDCR is not identifying how many inmates are or are not participating in specific prisons. The mass hunger strike is organized by prison gangs and publicizing participation levels at specific prisons could put inmates who are not participating in extreme danger.

In addition, 1,336 inmates have refused to participate in their work assignments or attend educational classes.

Participation in a mass disturbance and refusing to participate in a work assignment are violations of state law, and any participating inmates will receive disciplinary action in accordance with the California Code of Regulations, Title 15, Section 3323(h)(A) and Section 3323(f)(7).

Inmates identified as leading and perpetuating the disturbance will be subject to disciplinary action in accordance with the California Code of Regulations, Title 15 Section 3315(a)(2)(L) and may be removed from the general population and be placed in an Administrative Segregation Unit pursuant to CDCR’s hunger strike policy.

CDCR does not condone inmate disturbances. Mass hunger strikes, work stoppages and other disruptions have the potential to impact programs, operations, staffing, safety and security.

CDCR will make every effort to maintain normal program operations for non-participating inmates; however, if normal programming is affected, CDCR will notify inmates and their families.

CDCR may need to take additional measures to effectively monitor and manage hunger strikers and their nutritional intake. This could include the possible removal of canteen items from the cells of participating inmates. CDCR is continuing to offer state-issued meals to all inmates.

CDCR has revised its gang validation and Security Housing Unit (SHU) confinement policies and procedures. The new revisions were implemented as a pilot program on October 18, 2012.

The new comprehensive strategy supports CDCR’s goals of reducing long-term SHU confinement for offenders who do not engage in gang behavior.

The reforms place an emphasis on documented behavior, provide individual accountability of offenders, incorporate additional elements of due process to the validation system and provide a Step-Down Program as an alternative for offenders to demonstrate their commitment and willingness to refrain from criminal gang behavior.

Moreover, gang associates – a majority of inmates housed in SHUs – are no longer placed in a SHU based solely upon their validation unless there is a corresponding confirmed disciplinary behavior at the time of the original validation.

Since last October, CDCR has conducted 382 case-by-case reviews of validated inmates housed indefinitely in SHUs. As of June 28, 208 inmates housed in SHUs have either been transferred or are approved for transfer to a general population facility and 115 inmates were placed in various phases of the Step-Down Program, an incentive-based, multi-step program that provides graduated housing, enhanced programs, interpersonal interactions and increased privileges for validated inmates who refrain from criminal gang behavior.

The “Security Threat Group Identification, Prevention and Management Strategy” can be found at http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/STG/


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 11, 2013 
CONTACT: Terry Thornton
(916) 445-4950


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CDCR Secretary Jeff Beard’s Appointment Confirmed by Senate 23-6

SACRAMENTO — The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today announced that CDCR Secretary Dr. Jeffrey Beard, 66, was confirmed by the California Senate with a 23-6 vote

Beard has served as acting CDCR Secretary since being appointed by Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. in December 2012.

“I am honored to be working for the people of California and the Brown Administration, said Secretary Beard. “I am committed to ensuring California’s prison system holds offenders accountable, provides safe and secure facilities for staff as well as inmates, and expands innovative rehabilitative programs. I will continue to work  with local law enforcement to make California’s Public Safety Realignment Law a success and look forward to California getting out from under costly federal court oversight and regaining full control of its prison system.”

Beard, a licensed psychologist who has a doctorate in counseling, previously served as Secretary for the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections from 2001 until he retired in 2010. In that position he oversaw approximately 51,000 inmates and 16,000 employees.

He has advised state agencies, private companies, and the National Institute of Corrections on security and mental health issues of inmates. In 2007, Beard served on an expert panel whose report on rehabilitation served as a tool for implementing historic corrections reforms signed into law by Governor Schwarzenegger. Beard served as a consultant for CDCR in 2011, advising the department on ways it could improve its medical and mental health care for inmates in order to get out from federal court oversight.

"The California State Sheriffs’ Association (CSSA) is pleased that the Senate has confirmed Secretary Beard to lead the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, and we would like to congratulate the Secretary for being entrusted with this extremely important office during this very critical time,” said CSSA President and Alameda County Sheriff Gregory Ahern. “The Secretary has met with sheriffs throughout the state and has toured many of our jails. He has demonstrated his strong commitment to public safety and we look forward to continuing to work with Secretary Beard and CDCR to ensure the ongoing success of Realignment.”

CDCR is California's correctional agency, consisting of the Division of Adult Operations, the Division of Adult Programs and the Division of Juvenile Justice. Additionally, CDCR oversees the functions of the Board of Parole Hearings, the Commission on Juvenile Justice, the Council on Mentally Ill Offenders, the Prison Industry Authority Board, the Council for Interstate Adult Offender Supervision, the Joint Venture Policy Advisory Board, and the Prison Industry Board.

CDCR consists of 33 adult prisons, 45 conservation camps, and three youth facilities, as well as various boards and commissions. CDCR currently has approximately 52,524 employees and is responsible for 132,764 inmates.

The statutory salary for the Secretary of CDCR is $225,000 a year. 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 11, 2013                                        
Contact: Dana Simas                                                 
916) 445-4950


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Wednesday, July 10, 2013

North Kern State Prison Escapee Captured

DELANO – An inmate who escaped from North Kern State Prison (NKSP) Minimum Support Facility was captured this morning.  Inmate Hatem Hassoun, a minimum-custody inmate, was noticed missing during an unscheduled security inspection at approximately 1:30 am today.  Escape procedures were immediately activated.

Inmate Hassoun was captured at approximately 10:45 a.m. today by NKSP Investigative Services Unit and CDCR Special Security Unit, six miles north of the institution near Allensworth.  No force was used in the apprehension.

Hassoun was serving a two-year sentence for Possession of a Controlled Substance with a Firearm from Los Angeles in December 2012. 

NKSP opened in April 1993, houses approximately 4600 inmates and is located in Delano Ca. NKSP has a two-fold mission. First, it functions as a reception center for the processing of incoming inmates from southern and northern counties. Secondly, it functions as the Central California Transportation Hub for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JULY 10, 2013
CONTACT:  LT. GEORGE BECERRA
(661)721-2345


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North Kern State Prison Escapee

DELANO – An inmate assigned to North Kern State Prison (NKSP) Minimum Support Facility was discovered missing by custody staff on July 10, 2013, at approximately 1:30 a.m.  Inmate Hatem Hassoun, a minimum-custody inmate, could not be located by custody staff during an unscheduled security inspection.  Escape procedures were immediately activated.

Inmate Hassoun was serving a two-year sentence for Possession of a Controlled Substance with a Firearm from Los Angeles in December 2012.  Hassoun is described as a 42-year-old Caucasian male with brown hair and eyes and weighing approximately 160 pounds.

Kern County law enforcement agencies and surrounding residents have been notified.

Anyone with information on Hassoun’s whereabouts or who sees him is urged to notify local authorities or North Kern State Prison, or call 911.

NKSP opened in April 1993, houses approximately 4600 inmates and is located in Delano Ca. NKSP has a two-fold mission. First, it functions as a reception center for the processing of incoming inmates from southern and northern counties. Secondly, it functions as the Central California Transportation Hub for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JULY 10, 2013
CONTACT:  LT. GEORGE BECERRA
(661)721-2345




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