Thursday, August 29, 2013

CDCR Honors Employees at 29th Annual Medal of Valor Ceremony

Department recognizes more than 100 employees for heroism, outstanding service

SACRAMENTO – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) honored 116 employees today during the department’s annual Medal of Valor Ceremony. Employees were recognized for extraordinary bravery and conduct above and beyond the call of duty, often in life-saving incidents where public safety was at risk.


“CDCR employees statewide are committed to protecting public safety,” said CDCR Secretary Jeff Beard. “Today we are honoring the bravery and performance that goes well above the call of duty. These dedicated employees gave of themselves, and some even placed their own lives in jeopardy to save another.”

Awards were presented by Secretary Beard and senior department executives at the 29th annual ceremony, which was sponsored by the California Correctional Supervisors Organization.

In many instances, the recipients saved the life of other employees, inmates or private citizens as they responded to emergencies. Among the actions recognized by the awards were quick responses that saved the lives of traffic-accident victims and actions by a parole agent that saved the life of a wounded fellow agent. Also honored was the distinguished service of men and women to CDCR over a period of time.


The awards presented ranged from the Distinguished Service Award to the Gold Star.  For the second year, Employee of the Year awards were presented by various divisions within CDCR.
A complete list of 2013 award winners follows:

GOLD STAR MEDAL

The Corrections Star (Gold) medal is the department’s second-highest award for heroic deeds under extraordinary circumstances. The employee shall display courage in the face of immediate peril in acting to save the life of another person.

Correctional Officer Jason Parkhurst, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Charles Contreras, California Correctional Institution


Parole Agent I Henrik Agasyan, California Parole Apprehension Team, Los Angeles

SILVER STAR MEDAL

The Corrections Star (Silver) medal is the department’s third-highest award for acts of bravery under extraordinary or unusual circumstances. The employee shall display courage in the face of potential peril while saving or attempting to save the life of another person or distinguish themselves by performing in stressful situations with exceptional tactics or judgment.

Correctional Officer Angela Hazewood, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Officer Jeff Gold, Mule Creek State Prison


Correctional Officer Joann Burnias, California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility/
State Prison, Corcoran


Correctional Counselor Martin Hernandez, California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility/ State Prison, Corcoran


Special Agent Steve Epperson, Office of Correctional Safety, Special Service Unit, San Diego


Correctional Lieutenant Christopher Paris, Office of Correctional Safety, Headquarters


Correctional Lieutenant Cris Caldwell, Office of Correctional Safety, Headquarters

BRONZE STAR MEDAL

The Corrections Star (Bronze) is the department’s award for saving a life without placing oneself in peril. The employee shall have used proper training and tactics in a professional manner to save, or clearly contribute to saving, the life of another person.

Correctional Lieutenant Harold Hughes, Sierra Conservation Center


Parole Agent I Michael Williams, Oakland Parole Unit #2


Correctional Sergeant Anthony Morales, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Thomas Quezada, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Officer Jason Murillo, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Sergeant Charles Finnegan, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Sergeant Larry Holloway, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Officer Haydel Mitchell, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Sergeant Larry Dotterman, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Mario Alonzo, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Cresencio Alpuche, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Fire Captain Mark Del Barba, Deuel Vocational Institution


Parole Agent I Bartolo Siino, Parole Region I, Hanford Unit


Correctional Officer Sandra Copeland, California Correctional Institution


DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL

The Distinguished Service Medal is for an employee’s exemplary work conduct with the department for a period of months or years, or involvement in a specific assignment of unusual benefit to the Department.

 
Dr. Timothy McCarthy, Chief of Mental Health, Pelican Bay State Prison (Posthumously)


Dr. Elaina Jannell, Psychologist, California State Prison, Solano


Dr. Steven Sherman, Clinical Psychologist, N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility


Parole Agent I Roger Gold, Redwood City Parole Unit


Parole Agent III Gregory Weber, Redwood City Parole Unit


Correctional Lieutenant Tom Langford, Folsom State Prison


Parole Agent I Beth Bowens, O.H. Close Youth Correctional Facility


Special Agent Karen Mory, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Special Agent Brian Docherty, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Special Agent John Castanedo, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Special Agent Jeff Faust, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Special Agent Steve Gutierrez, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Special Agent Jason Marks, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Special Agent Guillermo Moreno, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Office Technician Gener Santiago, Rancho Cucamonga Special Service Unit


Parole Agent II Gordon Lee, Redwood City Parole Unit


UNIT CITATION


The Unit Citation is for great courage displayed by a departmental unit in the course of conducting an operation in the face of immediate life-threatening circumstances.

 
Correctional Officer Gabriel Aguilar, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Officer Joseph Bailey, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Officer Angela Hazewood, California State Prison, Sacramento


Correctional Officer Marsell Johnson, California State Prison, Sacramento
Correctional Officer Michael Platt, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Edward Shew, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Daniel Torres, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Michael Rivera, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Michael Smith, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Saul Lopez, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Monica Milke, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Eddie Nunez, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Hugh McFarlane, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer David Morales, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Scott Patterson, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Juan Garcia, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Tyler Healy, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Todd Levesque, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Adam Garvey, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Rick Jones, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer David Linch, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Paul Birdsong, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Larry Dotterman, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Michael Foster, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Reginald Burks, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Dennis Duffield, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Mark Aguilar, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Mario Alonzo, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Officer Rodolfo Alaniz, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Felipe Alvarez, Ironwood State Prison


Correctional Lieutenant Michael Calhoun, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Gary Turner III, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Stacie Henley, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Harold Weaver, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Bobby Wheeler, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Charles Hougland, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Kenneth Harper, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Sergeant Richard Kemp, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Counselor I Dave Tamplen, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Oscar Smith, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Ricardo Cisneros, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer James Whittaker, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Garrett Giessner, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Jeff Ammon, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Troy Parker, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Terry Barron, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Jim Herring, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Bryan Jeanes, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Johnny Lee, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Gary Lowry, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Christopher Nason, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Cheryl Nichols, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Michael Oatman, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Darrel Ulbricht, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Brian Von Rader, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Joseph White, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Jason Harrell, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Cal Huskey, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Merle Murchison, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Robert Rivera, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Dennis Ruble, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Greg Watkins, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Scott Proffer, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer James Kline, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Bobby Lee, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Steven Wood, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Diana Oliva, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Shayna Robertson, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Fallon Shelton, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Devon Rainwater, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Anthony Pickens, High Desert State Prison


Correctional Officer Evan Zahniser, High Desert State Prison


EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR AWARDS


ADMINISTRATOR OF THE YEAR


Sirisha Gullapalli, Senior Information Systems Analyst, Enterprise Information Services


MEDICAL/DENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONAL OF THE YEAR


Dr. Gregory Tarasoff, Chief Psychiatrist, San Quentin State Prison


REHABILITATION PROFESSIONAL OF THE YEAR


Carlos Ramirez, Correctional Counselor III, California Institution for Men


DIVISION OF JUVENILE JUSTICE OFFICER OF THE YEAR


Quincy Elloie, Treatment Team Supervisor, O.H. Close Youth Correctional Facility


CORRECTIONAL SUPERVISOR OF THE YEAR

Sergeant Elijah Caron, California State Prison, Sacramento

CORRECTIONAL PEACE OFFICER OF THE YEAR

Correctional Officer Eli Davis, Chuckawalla Valley State Prison


EXECUTIVE OF THE YEAR


Warden Ronald Rackley, California Health Care Facility, Stockton


For Immediate Release
August 29, 2013
Contact Jeffrey Callison or
Terry Thornton
(916) 445-4950




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Wednesday, August 28, 2013

Salinas Valley State Prison Correctional Officer Taken to Outside Hospital Due to Inmate Attack

SOLEDAD – A correctional officer is being treated for injuries he suffered from an attack by a Salinas Valley State Prison inmate this morning.

At 9:43 a.m., the Correctional Officer was on-duty at the institution’s Facility Medical Clinic when inmate Walter Weeks, 29, approached the officer from behind and began to assault him. The assault caused the Officer to fall, striking his head and losing consciousness.
 
Inmate Weeks was subdued and subsequently transported to the Administrative Segregation Unit.

The Officer was taken to an area hospital for treatment for his injuries, which are still unknown at this time.

Inmate Weeks was committed to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation on December 2, 2005 from Los Angeles County to serve a 24-year sentence for carjacking and second-degree robbery.

The matter will be referred to the Monterey County District Attorney’s Office for prosecution.

SVSP opened May 1996 on approximately 300 acres in Monterey County. The institution provides long-term housing for approximately 3,530 minimum- and maximum-custody male inmates and employs approximately 1,400 staff.
 

Photo of inmate Weeks, Walter

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Lt. Darren Chamberlain
August 28, 2013
(831) 678-5554

New Inmate Mental Health Facility Unveiled In San Luis Obispo

$38.6 million facility will provide 50 beds for crisis treatment 
 
Sacramento –The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today opened the doors to a new facility on the grounds of the California Men’s Colony in San Luis Obispo that will provide in-patient care to inmates in crisis situations who require 24 hour a day treatment.

The Intermediate level, in-patient care facility will house up to 50 inmates at a time and complement other mental health treatment facilities that provide out-patient treatment at the prison. The 45,700 sq. ft. facility is funded by bond financing authorized by AB 900, the Public Safety and Rehabilitation Services Act of 2007, to relieve prison overcrowding and upgrade facilities to meet court-ordered improvements in medical, dental and mental health treatment for inmates.

The new facility is one of 15 mental health treatment projects recently completed or under construction by CDCR, at a cost of $1.3 billion, to provide constitutionally required levels of care and to comply with litigation (Coleman) requiring improved mental health treatment for inmates.

“This facility and more than a dozen others we have constructed or are building are proof of CDCR’s commitment to providing the level of mental health treatment that the courts and the law require and that about one-third of our inmates need,” said Deborah Hysen, Deputy Director of Facility Planning, Construction and Management.   Approximately 32,400 male inmates (25 percent) and 2,256 female inmates (37.9 percent) require mental health treatment.  

“CDCR also is contributing to California’s environmental goals by using construction methods and materials that benefit the environment and reduce emissions that contribute to global climate change,” Hysen noted.    

The facility includes hospital style treatment rooms, nursing stations to monitor in-mate patients, space for individual and group counseling sessions, and administrative offices, behind an extension of the lethal electrified security fence that surrounds the California Men’s Colony.

The building also incorporates many conservation features to improve energy efficiency, conserve water and reduce sewage flow. They include high efficiency heating and air conditioning units that will significantly reduce electrical demand and greenhouse gas emissions.  A vacuum plumbing system will reduce sewage discharges by 70 percent and low flow fixtures and facets will reduce drinkable water use by 30 percent.   The project is a candidate for Gold certification, the highest level in the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program.

More information on CDCR is available at:  www.cdcr.ca.gov


For Immediate Release
August 28, 2013
Contact Bill Sessa (916) 445-4950 or
Monica Ayon (805) 547-7948

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Monday, August 26, 2013

CDCR’s Responses to Hunger Strikers’ Demands


In May 2011, prior to two hunger strikes that year, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) began revising its gang validation and Security Housing Unit (SHU) confinement policies and procedures. This effort resulted in the “Security Threat Group Prevention, Identification and Management Strategy,” approved and certified by the Office of Administrative Law on October 18, 2012 and filed with the Secretary of State. (http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/stg/)

The Security Threat Group (STG) policy addresses the concerns inmates raised during two hunger strikes in 2011. The STG program provides individual accountability of offenders; is behavior-based; incorporates additional elements of due process to the validation system; and provides a Step-Down Program as an alternative for inmates to demonstrate their willingness to refrain from criminal gang behavior.

Despite policy changes that had already addressed the concerns raised during the two previous hunger strikes, gang leaders initiated a third strike and made 40 additional demands. CDCR has already addressed the 40 additional issues raised by hunger strikers.

CDCR’S response to the five core demands

1. Individual Accountability.
Response: This issue has already been addressed through implementation and adoption of the STG and Step-Down programs.

2. Abolish Debriefing and Modify Active/Inactive Gang Status Criteria.
Response: This issue is partially non-negotiable and has partially been addressed via the STG program.
The debriefing program will not be abolished. CDCR will always support offenders who want to disavow or disengage from the gang lifestyle. It is rehabilitation. This issue is non-negotiable. However, CDCR has created a Step-Down program that enables an inmate serving an indeterminate SHU term to earn his way back to a general-population yard without dropping out of his gang as long as the inmate refrains from gang behavior.
The criteria for active/inactive gang status as well as the housing location for gang affiliates have been modified by the STG program.

3. End Long-Term Solitary Confinement.
Response: This issue has already been addressed via the STG program. CDCR does not utilize “solitary confinement.” Additionally, the length of an indeterminate SHU assignment is now determined by individual inmate behavior. It is now possible for an indeterminate term to be reduced to 3-4 years. Moreover, STG associates will no longer be placed in a SHU based solely upon their validation.

4. Provide Adequate Food.
Response: This issue has already been addressed. CDCR has always provided food with adequate calories and nutrition to all inmates regardless of housing assignment.  In other words, SHU inmates eat the same food and receive the same portions as other inmates. CDCR’s food menus and portions are based on nutritional guidelines established by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Academy of Science. CDCR’s Standardized Menu Review Team, made up of food managers and health care managers, meets regularly and addresses inmates’ concerns.

5. Expand and Provide Programming and Privileges for SHU inmates.
Response: This issue has already been addressed via the STG program through which more programming and privileges can be earned. CDCR has:
Approved proctors for college examinations.
Authorized requested clothing items (watch caps, sweat pants).
Authorized requested inmate property (wall calendars, art supplies and hobby items).
Authorized additional photographs for disciplinary free inmates.
Installed exercise equipment, including wheeled ab rollers and pull-up bars in the SHU yards.

Since October 2012, as part of the new STG program, CDCR has been conducting case-by-case reviews of all inmates serving an indeterminate SHU term based on their gang validation. As a result, nearly two-thirds of SHU inmates reviewed have been released to the general population.

Additional incremental privileges and programming are provided as part of the Step Down program.

CDCR’S response to the 40 supplemental demands

Note: CDCR had already addressed or was taking action on these issues before the start of the current hunger strike. For example, CDCR reviewed allowable property items for inmates housed in the SHU and authorized additional allowances in June.

1. Rescind all past Rules Violation Reports (RVR) issued during prior hunger strikes.
Response: CDCR will not rescind past RVRs.

2. Refrain from issuing RVRs during the current hunger strike.
Response: CDCR will adhere to its regulations that allow the issuance of RVRs for inmates participating in disturbances such as this which disrupt the orderly operations of an institution.

3. Refrain from moving hunger strike participants to Administrative Segregation Units (ASU) or removing their property.
Response: CDCR will adhere to its hunger strike policies and procedures to ensure the safety of the institution and contain the mass disturbance, including the re-housing of some participants and the removal of canteen items. This is non-negotiable.

4. Re-open the Facility D Visiting Room in Pelican Bay State Prison (PBSP) Security Housing Unit.
Response: This issue has already been addressed. CDCR has returned the Facility D law library back to being a visiting room and has extended visiting hours.

5. Allow SHU inmates to make one weekly phone call.
Response: Additional phone calls are provided incrementally in the Step-Down Program, which allows SHU inmates one annual phone call in Steps 1 and 2; two in Step 3; and four annual calls in Step 4. Inmates in Step 5 have phone calls in accordance with general population inmates.

6. Allow all SHU/ASU inmates to possess hobby supplies and take an annual photograph without first having to be disciplinary-free.
Response:
In August 2011, CDCR began allowing SHU inmates who remain disciplinary-free to purchase hobby craft items and to take one photo per year to send to their loved ones and family members. These items are privileges and will not be granted if an inmate’s behavior violates rules and regulations.

7. Allow all prisoners to sell or exchange artwork without being disciplined.
Response: This is non-negotiable due to safety and security concerns.

8. Annually restock all of the SHU/ASU libraries using the CDCR budget or Inmate Welfare Fund.
Response: This issue has already been addressed. Recreational libraries have been restocked annually for the past four years.

9. Provide more rehabilitation and educational programs using the CDCR budget or Inmate Welfare Fund.
Response: This issue has already been addressed. In accordance with the “Future of California Corrections Blueprint,” academic teachers and vocational instructors will be added over the next two years.  This is also provided in the Step-Down Program.

10. Revise regulations relating to the limitation on inmate-owned legal materials to provide clarity and direction to staff.
Response: This issue has already been addressed. CDCR issued a clarifying memorandum dated June 5, 2013, regarding the regulations on inmate legal materials.

11. Allow inmates to donate old appliances to other inmates when they purchase a new one.
Response: Due to safety and security concerns, this is non-negotiable.

12. Increase the maximum canteen draw for D-status inmates from $55 a month to $65 a month.
Response: This issue has already been addressed. The Step-Down program allows inmates to increase their canteen draws.

13. Allow SHU and D-status inmates to participate in “charity food drives.”
Response: This issue has already been addressed. The Step-Down program allows inmates in Steps 3 and 4 to donate funds to local charities, pursuant to a memorandum issued June 5, 2013.

14. Allow SHU D-status inmates to possess a clear-cased typewriter.
Response: This issue has already been addressed. CDCR has authorized the possession of this item pursuant to a memorandum dated June 5, 2013.

15. Allow SHU D-status inmates to possess two approved appliances.
Response: This issue has already been addressed. CDCR has authorized the possession of two appliances pursuant to a memorandum dated June 5, 2013.

16. Allow ASU inmates to possess TV/radio appliances regardless of whether their cells have fire sprinklers.
Response: This issue has already been addressed in facilities where the infrastructure supports it. (Not all ASUs have electrical outlets at this time and cannot currently accommodate appliances.) It should also be noted that CDCR does not have a policy requiring fire sprinklers in cells with appliances.

17. Allow all life-term prisoners to have “family overnight visits” and not only those who have debriefed.
Response: CDCR does not have such a policy. State law specifies which inmates are eligible to have family, or overnight, visits. Family visiting is also governed by Penal Code sections 187, 192, and 243.4.

18. Provide better quality mattresses.
Response: The California Prison Industry Authority (CalPIA) provides mattresses in accordance with industry standards.  An independent, certified testing facility tested the mattresses produced and they were found to have met or exceeded the industry standard.

19. Provide boxer shorts with longer inseams (to at least 9”).
Response: CalPIA provides clothing in accordance with industry standards. Its boxer shorts have longer inseams than many other manufacturers’.

20. Allow SHU and ASU inmates to order an additional annual non-food special-purchase package in addition to the one food package currently allowed.
Response: This issue has already been addressed. Inmates in Step 4 of the Step-Down Program are allowed to receive two packages per year.

21. Revise the property matrix to allow SHU and ASU inmates to possess specified food and property items.
Response: This issue has already been partially addressed. CDCR is in the process of revising its property matrix to add additional items.  In the interim, a memorandum dated June 5, 2013, was issued authorizing the purchase and possession of additional items.

22. Refrain from utilizing CalPIA for food products due to poor quality.
Response: CDCR’s menus are based on nutritional guidelines established by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Academy of Science and CDCR’s Standardized Menu Review Team meets regularly to address inmates’ concerns.

23. Raise food ounce servings by two additional ounces.
Response: CDCR’s food menus and portions comply with the nutritional guidelines established by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Academy of Science. Inmates in the SHU receive the same food and portion sizes as other inmates.

24. Allow uncut R-rated movies.
Response: State prison regulations do not allow films with ratings other than “G”, “PG” or “PG-13” for either general inmate viewing or within the classroom.

25. Provide a minimum of 20 “quality entertainment channels” at PBSP.
Response: The number and type of television channels varies depending upon each prison’s geographic location. PBSP already receives 23 channels, more channels than any other state prison.

26. Utilize the Inmate Welfare Fund to purchase the infrastructure to provide the channels described above.
Response: The Inmate Welfare Fund is not authorized to purchase television equipment, digital antenna towers or pay cable television fees. It is fiscally irresponsible to expend more money from CDCR’s budget for this.

27. Install the promised dip and pull-up bars on all SHU and ASU yards.
Response: This issue has already been addressed in the SHU yards, where pull-up bars have been installed. However, ASUs are temporary placements for inmates and CDCR does not anticipate installing permanent fixtures in those yards.

28. Install weightlifting equipment on all general population yards utilizing the CDCR or Inmate Welfare Fund budgets.
Response: In 1994, the California Legislature deemed weightlifting a threat to other inmates, staff and the public and restricted access to weights. (Penal Code 5010) Because of safety and security concerns, CDCR does not intend to install weightlifting equipment on all general population yards.

29. Halt all “arbitrary” contraband watches. Halt the use of PVC tubes as part of contraband watch procedures. Provide inmates placed on contraband watch with the option of first being x-rayed.
Response: The first issue here has already been addressed; PVC tubes are not used as part of contraband watch. Halting contraband surveillance watches is non-negotiable.

30. Immediately remove Dr. Sayre as the Chief Medical Officer at PBSP
Response: This is non-negotiable.

31. Paint all CDCR prison cells that are bare concrete
Response: Painting all prison cells is not fiscally responsible.

32. Fix the flawed ventilation system at PBSP
Response: Temperatures in all inmate housing units are to be maintained between 68 and 90 degrees. PBSP plant operations staff evaluated the PBSP SHU and it is operating within this range.

33. Cut one foot off the bottom of the Lexan/plexiglass cell coverings
Response: Lexan/plexiglass covered cells are necessary as they are routinely used to house inmates who have a propensity for violence against staff or other inmates. CDCR is also subject to an order by the Occupational Safety and Health Board that requires such cells to be covered in such a way that fluids and projectiles cannot be launched.

34. Reduce inmate restitution deductions from 55 percent to 33 percent
Response: Title 15 regulations dictate restitution deductions. CDCR is not willing to undergo the process of amending a Title 15 regulation in order to lower restitution deductions at the expense of crime victims.

35. Order IGI (Institution Gang Investigations) staff to “stop being so extremely petty”
Response: CDCR Institution Gang Investigators are not “extremely petty.” They are focused on investigating criminal behavior and maintaining the safety and security of prisons.

36. Amend the regulations re: Administrative Rules Violations so that no restrictions can be imposed if the hearing is not held within 30 days of issuance and that the charges be dismissed if the hearing is not held within 60 days of issuance
Response: CDCR does not intend to change existing regulatory time frames codified in state law.

37. Amend the regulations re: Serious Rules Violations so that no restrictions can be imposed if the hearing is not held within 60 days of issuance and that the charges be dismissed if the hearing is not held within 90 days of issuance
Response: CDCR does not intend to change existing regulatory time frames codified in state law.

38. Order an independent audit of the IWF covering the preceding five years
Response: The California Department of Finance is statutorily required to conduct biennial audits of the Inmate Welfare Fund pursuant to Penal Code Section 5006.

39. Order that all Associate Wardens (with full and final authority to settle issues) conduct monthly meetings with general population,  SHU, ASU, and Death Row inmate representatives
Response: Institution managers and supervisory staff are mandated to tour each ASU and SHU housing unit on a weekly basis. The Warden has the responsibility to address local issues.

40. During any hunger strike negotiations, that a member of their mediation/litigation team and the press be present.
Response: While CDCR is committed to transparency and is willing to engage in discussions with various stakeholders, it is not efficient to have a member of the press present at every discussion.

# # #

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
AUGUST 26, 2013
CONTACT: JEFFREY CALLISON
OR TERRY THORNTON
(916) 445-4950

Friday, August 16, 2013

Hunger Strike Update

SACRAMENTO – As of today, 190 inmates in eight state prisons are on a hunger strike disturbance, down from 12,421 inmates on July 11, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). An inmate is considered to be on a hunger strike after he has missed nine consecutive meals.

A total of 98 inmates have been on a hunger strike continuously since July 8.

Currently, due to the demands on staff, CDCR is conducting case-by-case reviews of validated prison gang members and associates only in institutions that have no inmates participating in the hunger strike. As of August 12, 425 reviews have been completed systemwide; 268 validated inmates have either been transferred or are approved for transfer to a general population facility and 125 inmates were placed in various phases of the Step-Down Program, an incentive-based, multi-step program that provides graduated housing, enhanced programs, interpersonal interactions and increased privileges for validated inmates who refrain from criminal gang behavior.

# # #

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
AUGUST 16, 2013
CONTACT: JEFFREY CALLISON
OR TERRY THORNTON
(916) 445-4950

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Prison Doctor Recovering from Inmate Assault

Two correctional sergeants suffered minor injuries

IONE – A staff physician is recovering from injuries she suffered yesterday from an attack by a Mule Creek State Prison inmate.

Shortly after 8 a.m. on August 12, 2013, inmate Robert Daniel Perry, 61, arrived to a medical appointment at the prison. Without warning, he grabbed the doctor by her hair and started choking her. During the struggle, she managed to activate her personal alarm device. Responding medical staff grabbed the doctor from the inmate’s hold.

Responding custody staff used physical force to subdue Perry and restrain him. One correctional sergeant suffered a cut on his arm and a second sergeant was exposed to blood.

After the incident, custody staff recovered a weapon the inmate had made from two razor blades and found another weapon in the inmate’s cell.

The 65-year-old doctor, a 20-year veteran of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, suffered redness and bruising on her neck. She is at home recovering.

The prison’s Investigative Services Unit is investigating the incident. The Amador County District Attorney’s Office was notified.

Inmate Perry was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on June 18, 1998 from Placer County with a 100-year sentence for making terrorist threats, stalking and attempted extortion. On December 5, 2006, he began serving a 50-year sentence from Kings County for two counts of battery on a non-prisoner.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 13, 2013
Contact: Terry Thornton
(916) 445-4950

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Monday, August 12, 2013

American Correctional Association Certifies Five California Prisons

Pelican Bay, Correctional Training Facility, High Desert, Mule Creek and North Kern receive near-perfect scores following rigorous audit by national experts

SACRAMENTO – Five California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) prisons were certified today by the American Correctional Association (ACA) during its 143rd Congress of Correction in National Harbor, Maryland.

Correctional Training Facility in Soledad, High Desert State Prison in Susanville, Mule Creek State Prison in Ione, North Kern State Prison in Delano and Pelican Bay State Prison in Crescent City received near-perfect scores by the ACA, the oldest, most respected and largest international correctional association in the world.

“These hard-earned accreditations are only awarded to the best of the best in corrections,” said CDCR Secretary Jeff Beard. “The ACA was aware of the class action litigation against California, so it sent its most experienced auditors to review these prisons. Their findings demonstrate these institutions are providing quality health care and inmate programs and are employing the proper use of segregation. These accreditations are a testament to the hard work and dedication of our staff.”

For more than 135 years, the ACA has been the recognized expert in establishing measurable standards in prison management and works with the Commission on Accreditation for Corrections to certify correctional facilities. The ACA is responsible for conducting the audits; the Commission is responsible for granting or denying the accreditation.

“ACA accreditation is a process to measure compliance with the U.S. Constitution, help end federal court oversight of many of our operations, improve efficiency, increase accountability, and ensure California’s prisons are safe and humane for staff and offenders,” Secretary Beard said.

ACA standards are the national benchmark for the effective operation of correctional facilities throughout the nation. The accreditation audit is a comprehensive review, encompassing every area of prison operations including administration and management, fiscal controls, the physical plant, conditions of confinement, rules and discipline, inmate programs, health care, food service, sanitation, safety and emergency procedures, use of segregation, incidents of violence, crowding, offender activity levels, staff training and development, and the provision of basic services that can affect the life, safety and health of inmates and staff.

Institutions seeking accreditation have to comply with 521 ACA standards and score 100 percent for 61 mandatory requirements and at least 90 percent on 460 non-mandatory requirements. Roughly half of the mandatory standards address health care.

Since last fall, ACA standards compliance audit teams visited the five prisons and conducted comprehensive on-site audits of all aspects of prison operations. The teams found that all five prisons met all of the mandatory requirements and all five significantly exceeded the 90 percent mark for non-mandatory items.

Correctional Training Facility received 97.91 percent, High Desert State Prison received 99.06 percent, Mule Creek State Prison received 98.8 percent, North Kern State Prison received 97.66 percent, and Pelican Bay State Prison received 97.2 percent.

CDCR began the process of seeking nationally recognized accreditation from the ACA in 2010. California State Prison-Sacramento, California State Prison-Solano and Central California Women’s Facility in Chowchilla were the first CDCR prisons to be accredited by the ACA in 2012 with each achieving 98.6 percent, 99 percent and 98.16 percent. Once accredited, a prison has to maintain accreditation for three years.

Next year, Centinela State Prison, Folsom State Prison, Kern Valley State Prison, Sierra Conservation Center and Wasco State Prison-Reception Center will be audited by the ACA for accreditation. These five prisons will begin preparation for the formal training visits by an ACA auditor and will work with CDCR’s Adult Compliance/Peer Review Branch of the Office of Audits and Court Compliance, which provides departmental oversight of the ACA review process.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 12, 2013
Contact: Terry Thornton
(916) 445-4950
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For more about CDCR: http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/

For more about the American Correctional Association: http://www.aca.org/

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

CSP-SAC uses performance talents to open door to rehabilitation

By Chau Wilson, Coach and Dale Hamad, Principal (A)

Recovery  is the covenant of my evolution.
I stopped fighting my problems,
so I can solve my solutions,
and cease the delusions
that education is elusive
and exclusive to rich kids who
never knew what the risk did,
never knew what the rest did,
got abused and arrested.
Life is a pop quiz, so you know what
a test is.

This is a stanza written by the winner, Jimmy McMillan, of California State Prison, Sacramento’s 1st Annual Spoken Word Contest.

Twenty-seven participants from all four facilities submitted their literary works which addressed the topic, “Why Education is Essential to an Effective Rehabilitation and Recidivism Reduction Program.”

A panel of judges, including the institution’s artist facilitator, Jim Carlson, poet, JoAnn Anglin, and Principal (A) Hamad, first evaluated the quality of the written submissions.  Participants were then required to recite their literary works for the judges to evaluate their performances.

All of the judges at the live performance (Jim Carlson, Zoe Boekinder, poet, and Principal (A)  Hamad) as well as the audience members agreed that all the contestants did an outstanding job, making the selection of winners a challenge.

Coach Chau Wilson organized the contest.  The performance portion of the contest was attended by outside visitors from CDCR, staff and inmates.

This display of phenomenal talent is just one example of what can happen when talent is nurtured, supported, and given an outlet in which artistry is revealed.

Many of the contest participants are active in the Creative Writing workshops offered at CSP-SAC.  In these weekly workshops, inmates have a network of supportive fellow writers who give encourage, feedback, and applaud the efforts and talents of each individual.  For the past three years, CSP-SAC’s administration has approved various contests that advocate vast inmate participation as well as artistic expression.  Prior to this year’s Spoken Word Contest, CSP-SAC has also conducted essay and poetry contests.

These contests are intended to promote inmates’ engagement in self-reflection as well as spark their interest in participating in the various rehabilitative programs and activities that foster mental, physical, social, and spiritual growth.

This is one of the highlights of correctional education.  It is wonderful when the audience and the participants have such a great artistic experience.  We all win when we experience the fun and joy of learning.
             
First place, inmate Jimmy McMillan
Second place, inmate Will Harrison



Third place, inmate Will Harrison

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Hunger Strike Update

SACRAMENTO – As of today, 364 inmates in seven state prisons are on a hunger strike disturbance, down from 12,421 inmates on July 11, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). An inmate is considered to be on a hunger strike after he has missed nine consecutive meals.

A total of 210 inmates have been on a mass hunger strike continuously since July 8.

CDCR has resumed conducting case-by-case reviews of validated inmates in prisons that have no inmates participating in the hunger strike.

Since last October, CDCR has conducted 415 case-by-case reviews of validated inmates. As of today, August 6, 230 inmates housed in SHUs have either been transferred or are approved for transfer to a general population facility and 122 inmates were placed in various phases of the Step-Down Program, an incentive-based, multi-step program that provides graduated housing, enhanced programs, interpersonal interactions and increased privileges for validated inmates who refrain from criminal gang behavior.


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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
AUGUST 6, 2013

CONTACT: Terry Thornton or Jeffrey Callison
(916) 445-4950

Friday, August 2, 2013

CDCR Responds to Supreme Court Denying a Stay

SACRAMENTO - California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) Secretary Jeff Beard made the following statement today in response to the U.S. Supreme Court denying a stay of the Three-Judge Court order to continue reducing the state’s prison population: 

“While California’s stay request was denied today, the state will pursue its appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court so that the merits of the case can be considered without delay.” 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 2, 2013

Contact: Jeffrey Callison
(916) 445-4950