Friday, February 26, 2016

Inmate Firefighter Dies from Injuries Suffered in Mulholland Fire

 SACRAMENTO  – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today announced that an inmate firefighter injured yesterday in the Mulholland Fire has died.

In the early hours of Thursday morning, Shawna Lynn Jones, 22, was struck by a boulder that had rolled down a hill. She was airlifted to UCLA Medical Center, where she was listed in critical condition with major head injuries. Jones was removed from life support after her organs were donated, in keeping with her family’s wishes.

“Her death is a tragic reminder of the danger that inmate firefighters face when they volunteer to confront fires to save homes and lives,” said CDCR Secretary Scott Kernan. “On behalf of all of us in the department, I send my deepest condolences to her family.”

Jones was a Los Angeles County jail inmate who had joined CDCR’s firefighting program in August 2015 and was assigned to the Malibu Camp, which is operated jointly with the Los Angeles County Fire Department. Malibu is one of three camps that house a total of 195 female firefighters.

CDCR maintains a network of 44 conservation camps, in partnership with CAL FIRE. Five of the camps are jointly managed with the Los Angeles County Fire Department. The camps house approximately 3,500 inmate firefighters who cut containment lines to stop the spread of wildfires and douse hot spots during clean-up.  

Jones is only the third inmate firefighter to die on a fire line since the camp program began in 1943.  Female inmates were incorporated into the firefighting program in 1983.       


Contact: Bill Sessa
(916) 445-4950     


Thursday, February 25, 2016

Class-action Lawsuit against California’s Division of Juvenile Justice Terminated after Sweeping Reforms

                                 State now national model for youth offender treatment
OAKLAND – After more than a decade of reforms in California’s juvenile justice system - including limiting use of force, involving families in the rehabilitation of youth, and greatly reducing the juvenile offender population - the Alameda County Superior Court today terminated the Farrell lawsuit against the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s (CDCR) Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ).

“The Farrell case was resolved through years of hard work to improve our juvenile justice system,” said CDCR Secretary Scott Kernan. “DJJ has transformed itself into a national leader run by a staff that believes in rehabilitation.”

On January 16, 2003, Margaret Farrell, a taxpayer in the state of California, filed a lawsuit against the director of what was then called the California Youth Authority (CYA). The suit claimed CYA was expending funds on policies, procedures and practices that were illegal under state law. Farrell also claimed that CYA failed in its statutory duties to provide adequate treatment and rehabilitation for juvenile offenders in its care. The lawsuit also alleged that the youth offenders were denied adequate medical, dental and mental health care.

On November 19, 2004, the parties entered into a consent decree in which DJJ agreed to develop and implement six detailed remedial plans in the following areas: safety and welfare, mental health, education, sexual behavior treatment, health care, dental services, and youth with disabilities. One of the most important reforms was the implementation of the Integrated Behavior Treatment Model (IBTM), a comprehensive approach to assessing, understanding and treating youth. The IBTM helps to reduce institutional violence and the risk of future criminal behavior.

“So many significant changes were made with Farrell, but I think the key would be the culture shift. We became an organization that’s built on evidence-based treatment programs that help youth build skills to be successful upon release,” DJJ Director Mike Minor said.

Separate from the Farrell remedial plans, but an important part of the overall reform, was the 2007 realignment of California’s juvenile justice system which reduced the DJJ population from 10,000 youth offenders to approximately 700. This made the living units less crowded and led to an improved staff- to-youth ratio.

One of the experts appointed by the court to assist in the transformation of DJJ was Barry Krisberg, a Senior Fellow at the UC Berkeley School of Law and a nationally known authority on juvenile justice. In a paper from 2014, Krisberg wrote that DJJ is “one of the most progressive juvenile corrections systems in the nation” and it “offers many very valuable policies and processes that could well benefit other jurisdictions.”

Now that the Farrell case has been terminated, DJJ will continue to offer and build on the services offered. These include the operation of an accredited school district providing youth with the same high school curriculum that they would receive in their home community. All non-graduates attend school Monday through Friday to work toward their high school diploma or, if they have short commitment periods, toward their GED’s. From 2010-2015, a total of 1,070 youth earned their high school diplomas or GED’s at one of the four DJJ youth facilities. Also during that time, 696 youth earned nationally recognized certificates in vocational training.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
FEBRUARY 25, 2016

CONTACT: JOE ORLANDO
(916) 445-4950
                                                               # # #

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Four California State Prison-Sacramento Employees Recovering From Inmate Attack

FOLSOM – California State Prison-Sacramento (CSP-SAC) officials have started an investigation into a staff assault incident that sent four employees to the hospital.

Shortly after 7 a.m. today, inmate Tyrone E. Owens, 32, suddenly attacked two psychiatric technicians who were dispensing medication in the unit’s dayroom. Without provocation, Owens pushed a medication cart into a psychiatric technician, knocking her to the floor. Owens then began striking a second psychiatric technician in his face and head with both of his fists. A correctional officer immediately used physical force to stop Owens’ attack. Two other officers also responded and were finally able to restrain Owens and remove him from the area.

The two psychiatric technicians and two correctional officers were injured and taken to an outside hospital. The first psychiatric technician who was knocked to the floor suffered a sprained wrist, bruised arm and swollen knees. The second psychiatric technician suffered abrasions, scratches and pain and swelling to his head and back. The first responding officer suffered pain to her head, elbow, knee and thigh and one of the responding officers was treated for scratches behind his ear. All four were treated and released.

Inmate Owens has been in prison since Dec. 31, 2007. He is serving a five-year conviction from Los Angeles County for second-degree robbery and a two-year, eight-month conviction for grand theft of a person. In February 2010, Owens received a four-year conviction from Riverside County for possession/manufacture of a deadly weapon by a prisoner, his second strike.

Officers investigating this incident searched the cell occupied by inmate Owens and his cellmate and recovered an inmate-manufactured weapon.

CSP-SAC, opened in 1986, is a maximum-security prison that houses nearly 2,300 general population inmates and employs about 1,700 people. The institution houses inmates serving long sentences and those who have proven to be management problems at other institutions. CSP-SAC also houses inmates requiring specialized mental health treatment.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
FEBRUARY 18, 2016

CONTACT: LT. L.A.  QUINN (916) 294-3012

Wednesday, February 17, 2016

California State Prison-Sacramento Inmate Death Being Investigated as a Homicide-Update

FOLSOM – Officials at California State Prison-Sacramento (CSP-SAC) and the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office are investigating the death of an inmate that occurred Monday as a homicide.

On February 15, 2016, at 8:20 p.m., correctional officers found 53-year-old Darryl Staples unresponsive in his cell. Custody and medical staff began lifesaving measures. Staples was pronounced dead at 8:48 p.m.

Staples was serving a life-with-the-possibility-of-parole sentence from Marin County for first-degree murder and had been in prison since June 10, 1983.

Staples’ cellmate, Rambo M. Martin, 26, has been identified as a suspect. Inmate Martin is serving an eight-year sentence from San Bernardino County for assault with a firearm, his second strike. He is also serving a four-year sentence from Kern County for assault by a prisoner with a deadly weapon. Martin has been in prison since November 2013.

CSP-SAC, opened in 1986, is a maximum-security prison that houses nearly 2,300 general population inmates and employs about 1,700 people. The institution houses inmates serving long sentences and those who have proven to be management problems at other institutions. CSP-SAC also houses inmates requiring specialized mental health treatment.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
FEBRUARY 17, 2016

CONTACT:  LT. L.A. QUINN (916) 294-3012
                                                                           ###

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

California State Prison-Sacramento Inmate Death Being Investigated as a Homicide

FOLSOM – Officials at California State Prison-Sacramento (CSP-SAC) and the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office are investigating the death of an inmate that occurred Monday as a homicide.

On February 15, 2016, at 8:20 p.m., correctional officers found a 53-year-old inmate unresponsive in his cell. Custody and medical staff began lifesaving measures. The inmate was pronounced dead at 8:48 p.m.

The inmate’s name is being withheld pending next-of-kin notification. He was serving a life-with-the-possibility-of-parole sentence from Marin County for first-degree murder and had been in prison since June 10, 1983.

The deceased inmate’s cellmate, Rambo M. Martin, 26, has been identified as a suspect. Inmate Martin is serving an eight-year sentence from San Bernardino County for assault with a firearm, his second strike. He is also serving a four-year sentence from Kern County for assault by a prisoner with a deadly weapon. Martin has been in prison since November 2013.

CSP-SAC, opened in 1986, is a maximum-security prison that houses nearly 2,300 general population inmates and employs about 1,700 people. The institution houses inmates serving long sentences and those who have proven to be management problems at other institutions. CSP-SAC also houses inmates requiring specialized mental health treatment.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
FEBRUARY 16, 2016

CONTACT: LT. TONY QUINN (916) 294-3012
                                                                          ###

Inmate Death at California Correctional Institution Being Investigated as a Homicide

TEHACHAPI – Officials at California Correctional Institution (CCI) are investigating the death of an inmate that occurred on Friday as a possible homicide.

Inmate Miguel J. Alejo, 46, was found unresponsive in his cell at approximately 12:30 p.m. on February 12, 2016. CCI staff immediately began lifesaving measures and an ambulance was called. While in the clinic Alejo regained a pulse. He was transported by ambulance to an outside hospital. Alejo was pronounced dead at 1:39 p.m. His next of kin has been notified.

Alejo was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on April 6, 2011, from Fresno County to serve a six-year sentence for second-degree robbery and second-degree burglary.

Prison officials have named Alejo’s cellmate, Thomas E. Santiago, 35, as a suspect. Santiago was received by CDCR on February 16, 2000, from Ventura County to serve a life sentence for second-degree attempted murder with a gang enhancement and intentional discharge of a firearm causing great bodily injury.

Santiago has been placed in the Administrative Segregation Unit pending the investigation by CCI, the Kern County Coroner and the Kern County District Attorney. The Office of the Inspector General was notified.

CCI opened in 1933 and houses approximately 3,500 minimum-, medium-, maximum- and high-security custody inmates. CCI offers academic classes and vocational programs and employs approximately 1,600 people. For more information, visit www.cdcr.ca.gov.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
FEBRUARY 16, 2016

CONTACT:
LT. JOSHUA TYREE (661) 822-4402 EXT. 3021
                                                                       ###

Thursday, February 11, 2016

Correctional Peace Officers Recovering After Inmate Attack

SAN DIEGO – Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility officials are investigating a staff assault that sent two correctional officers to the hospital. Officials are still investigating a similar incident that occurred on February 2.

On February 10, 2016, at 3:37 p.m., inmate Michael Stevens, 58, struck a correctional officer in the face, causing the officer to lose his balance and fall on the ground. Inmate Stevens then attacked a responding officer by repeatedly striking him in the face knocking him unconscious. Additional officers arrived on scene to subdue inmate Stevens and place him in restraints.

The two officers were taken to an outside hospital for treatment and released. The first officer suffered minor injuries. The second officer suffered a head injury. Both are expected to recover.

Inmate Stevens received minor injuries and was treated by medical staff at the prison. He was re-housed in the Administrative Segregation Unit pending an investigation.

Stevens was admitted to state prison on April 13, 2001, from Los Angeles County with a 10-year sentence for assault with a deadly weapon. During his incarceration he received a life-with-parole sentence in 2003 from Kern County for battery on a peace officer and other similar offenses committed while in prison.

Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility opened in July 1987 on approximately 780 acres in San Diego County. The primary mission of the prison is to provide housing and supervision for minimum- to high-security inmates. Designed as a training and work-oriented facility, RJDCF provides health care, vocational, academic and industrial programs for nearly 3,200 male inmates and employs about 1,500 people.


###
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 11, 2016
Contact: Lt. Phillip Bracamonte
(619) 661-7802

Monday, February 8, 2016

Death of State Prison Inmate Being Investigated as Homicide

LANCASTER – Officials at California State Prison-Los Angeles County (LAC) are investigating the death of an inmate. 

Inmate Rashell Clarke, 39, was found unresponsive in his cell at 10:48 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 6. Staff immediately began lifesaving measures and an ambulance was called. Clarke succumbed to his injuries and was pronounced deceased at 11:26 a.m.

Clarke was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on Jan. 12, 2010, to serve a 22-year, 8-month sentence for a Shasta County conviction for abusing/endangering the health of a child.

Prison officials and local law enforcement agencies are investigating the death as a suspected homicide and are questioning Clarke’s cellmate, 33-year-old Leron Morris, as a suspect. 

Morris was received by CDCR on Sept. 13, 2005, from Contra Costa County to serve a sentence of life without the possibility of parole for first-degree murder.

LAC in Lancaster provides long-term housing for male inmates classified as minimum-, medium- and maximum-security. CSP-LAC opened in 1993, houses approximately 3,500 inmates and employs more than 1,800 people.

For more information, contact Lt. Duane Bennett at (661) 729-6912.

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Correctional Peace Officers Recovering After Inmate Attack

SAN DIEGO – Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility officials are investigating a staff assault that sent three correctional peace officers to the hospital.

On February 2, 2016, at 6:45 p.m., inmate Timothy Green, 55, struck a correctional officer on the right side of his face, causing him to lose consciousness. Inmate Green advanced toward the officer to continue his attack. A lieutenant responded and tried to subdue the inmate. Inmate Green head-butted the lieutenant in his face. A second officer responded and helped the lieutenant restrain the inmate.

The two officers and the lieutenant were taken to an outside hospital for treatment and released. The first officer suffered a head injury. The second officer suffered a sprained forearm and the lieutenant suffered a sprained hand. All are expected to recover.

Inmate Green was not injured in the attack. He was re-housed in the Administrative Segregation Unit pending an investigation. Green was admitted to state prison on March 22, 1988, from Los Angeles County with a 15-year-to-life sentence for second-degree murder. Green was also sentenced in 1991 in Solano County with a two-year sentence for battery on a peace officer and in 2014 in Sacramento County with another two-year sentence for aggravated battery on a peace officer by gassing and battery on a non-prisoner.

Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility opened in July 1987 on approximately 780 acres in San Diego County. The primary mission of the prison is to provide housing and supervision for minimum- to high-security inmates. Designed as a training and work-oriented facility, RJDCF provides health care, vocational, academic and industrial programs for nearly 3,200 male inmates and employs about 1,500 people.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 3, 2016

CONTACT: LT. PHILIP BRACAMONTE
(619) 661-7802


# # #