Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Inmates Attack Officers at California State Prison-Los Angeles County

LANCASTER – Four correctional officers were injured Tuesday, June 28, in inmate attacks at California State Prison-Los Angeles County (LAC).

At 8:19 a.m., inmate Daniel Camp, 51, left his cell and attacked two correctional officers who were escorting his cellmate, Antoine LeBlanc, 29, back to the cell. One officer used pepper spray to stop the attack. However, during the attack LeBlanc forced an officer over the stair railing and the officer fell one story. As the other officer attempted to subdue LeBlanc, both also fell down the stairs.

Both officers were transported to an outside hospital for treatment of cuts to their heads and faces. One officer required five staples to the back of his head and will be kept overnight at the hospital for observation. The second officer was released and is recovering at home.

LeBlanc and Camp were examined by prison medical staff. LeBlanc sustained a cut to his forehead, and Camp was uninjured. Both inmates will be transferred to the California Institution for Men in Chino, where they will be housed in the Administrative Segregation Unit while the incident is investigated.

Camp was received by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) from Los Angeles County on Jan. 16, 1991, to serve a sentence of 29 years to life with the possibility of parole for first-degree murder. LeBlanc was received by CDCR on July 29, 2010, from Los Angeles County to serve a 37-year sentence for kidnapping, voluntary manslaughter, second-degree robbery and assault with a firearm.

After the incident, a third inmate, Ryan Brown, 26, was escorted off the yard due to his behavior, and into a gym, where he head-butted an officer, striking the brim of his hat. Physical force was used to place Brown in a holding cell. Two officers received minor injuries and were transported to an outside medical clinic for treatment. Brown sustained swelling to his eye and a cut to his mouth. Officials are investigating whether the two incidents are related.

Brown was received by CDCR on June 13, 2007, from Los Angeles County to serve a 29-year sentence for attempted second-degree murder.

LAC in Lancaster provides long-term housing for male inmates classified as minimum-, medium- and maximum-security. CSP-LAC opened in 1993, houses approximately 3,500 inmates and employs more than 1,800 people.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 28, 2016

CONTACT: LT. DUANE BENNETT
(661) 729-6912
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Friday, June 24, 2016

Juvenile Offenders Receive High School Diplomas, GED Certificates in Ventura Youth Correctional Facility

CAMARILLO – Today, fifty-eight youth offenders at the Ventura Youth Correctional Facility (VYCF) reached an important milestone, as they officially became graduates of the Class of 2016 of the Mary B. Perry High School located within the facility, and operated by the California Department of Corrections, Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ). Of the 58, forty-eight earned high school diplomas and ten their General Education Degrees (GED’s) certificates.
 
“These students have shown great commitment, effort and perseverance in completing their education, and shows that they can accomplish great things,” said Martin Griffin, principal of Mary B. Perry High School.

This year’s Valedictorian was Martha Nunez, who graduated with honors, and was the lead student mentor, chess club lady grand master and a contributor to the school newspaper. 

Others recognized at this year’s ceremony included Matthew Gainza, who was the first student from Mary B. Perry high school to receive a Microsoft Office Specialist certificate, and students Dajay Scott, Dijon Edwards, Mathew Gainza and Casey Painter, who were recognized and certified by the National Restaurant Association.

This year’s keynote speaker was James Anderson, Program Coordinator of the Anti-Recidivism Coalititon. Anderson grew up in Los Angeles County and was deeply involved in gangs and drugs at a young age. He turned his life around and is currently studying at UCLA, majoring in political science. Anderson was appointed to the State Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention by Governor Jerry Brown.

“I hope to raise awareness, inspire hope, and provide individuals with a different perspective on why juveniles become involved in delinquent behavior,” Anderson said. “I am living proof that it is never too late to change and turn your lives around.”

Ventura YCF is a reception center-clinic and program facility which houses and provides diagnostic services for males and females, separated by high fencing and barbed wire fencing. The male population generally outnumbers the females 10 to 1.

The DJJ operates an accredited school district, providing students with the same high school curriculum in each of its four institutions they would receive in their local community. Youth attend school Monday through Friday. DJJ considers a diploma or a GED a minimum requirement for parole consideration.

Each school provides a core curriculum that meets the content standards for California public high schools. Each student meets with his or her education advisor upon entry and monthly thereafter, to review their education plan. Modifications to the student’s high school graduation plan are made at least every six months if necessary.

Since 2010, 1,070 youth have earned their high school diplomas or GED’s at DJJ’s four high schools. During that same time, 696 youth earned nationally-recognized certificates in vocational training.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JUNE 24, 2016

CONTACT: KARETTE FUSSELL  
(805) 485-7951 EXT. 4909

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Monday, June 20, 2016

Offender Who Walked Away from Los Angeles Re-entry Facility Apprehended Within Hours

LOS ANGELES — A man who walked away from the Male Community Re-entry Program (MCRP) in Los Angeles County on June 17 was apprehended within hours.

Alex Ramos, 27, was reported missing from the MCRP around 8 p.m. last Friday, after officers received a tamper alert for his GPS monitoring device. Staff immediately conducted a facility-wide count and could not locate Ramos. Local law enforcement was notified, and agents from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) Special Services Unit were dispatched to the area.

Ramos was apprehended at 2:52 a.m. June 18 in Los Angeles. He was taken into custody without incident and transported to the California Institution for Men in Chino.

The MCRP allows eligible offenders committed to state prison to serve the end of their sentences in the re-entry center and provides them the programs and tools necessary to transition from custody to the community. It is a voluntary program for male offenders who have approximately 120 days left to serve. The program links participants to a range of community-based rehabilitative services that assist with substance use disorders, mental health care, medical care, employment, education, housing, family reunification and social support.

Ramos was received by CDCR on Oct. 2, 2014, from Los Angeles County to serve a four-year sentence for inflicting corporal injury on a spouse/cohabitant. He had been participating in MCRP since March 29.

Since 1977, 99 percent of all offenders who have left an adult institution, camp or community-based program without permission have been apprehended.

Contact: Krissi Khokhobashvili
(916) 445-4950

Friday, June 17, 2016

Juvenile Offenders Receive High School Diplomas, GED Certificates at N.A Chaderjian’s Graduation Ceremony

STOCKTON – Today, 39 juvenile offenders at N.A. Chaderjian Youth Correctional Facility (NACYCF) in Stockton formally completed their education, as 28 youths received their high school diplomas and eleven their General Education Degree (GED) certificates.

“We are very proud of the efforts and commitment of these young men, who today took a major step toward their rehabilitation,” said Dr. Pat Davies, N.A. Chaderjian High School Principal. “This ceremony is to celebrate their accomplishments, and to show them how much they are able to achieve.”

The slogan for this year’s graduation ceremony is “Fly like an Eagle.”

This year’s Valedictorian and student speaker was Connor McGrath, who was chosen by
Dr. Davies, his teachers, and other NACYCF staff for his hard work and academic dedication.

“Not only was this an accomplishment, but a struggle as well. I was considered a lost cause, and I feel like I’ve proven those doubters wrong,” said McGrath. “I want to say thank you to all the people who have supported me along the way. I will not let you down.”

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR), Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) operates an accredited school district, which provides youth offenders with the same high school curriculum in each of its four institutions they would receive in their home community. From 2010-2015, a total of 1,070 youth have earned a high school diploma or GED at DJJ’s four high schools. In addition, 696 students earned Career Technical Education certificates for vocational programs.

“This is a coordinated effort that allows youth offenders to complete their education, and become an example of change in the community,” added Dr. Davies.

The N.A. Chaderjian High School Keynote Speaker this year was Raymond McMuray, who is a foster grandparent at NACYCF. McMuray is a former heroin addict who became a certified instructor in substance abuse and alcohol treatment. He was the founder of the First African American methadone treatment program in California.

“I’ve come full circle from my troubled past and have returned here to help our youth realize their full potential,” McMuray told the graduates.

N.A. Chaderjian YCF is located in Stockton and houses male youth offenders 18 to 23 years of age. N.A. Chaderjian High School provides instruction in basic skills, high school courses, special education and vocational programs. Youth attend school Monday through Friday.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 17, 2016
CONTACT: Erin Brock
(209) 944-6301

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Condemned Inmate Gilbert R. Rubio, 55, Dies

SAN QUENTIN – Condemned inmate Gilbert R. Rubio, 55, was found unresponsive in his solely-occupied cell during a security check just after 6 a.m. today. He was pronounced deceased at 6:34 a.m. by paramedics who had been summoned to the institution. His cause of death is to be determined by the Marin County Coroner.
 
Rubio was sentenced to death on September 20, 2000, by a Los Angeles County jury for the 1998 murder and robbery of George Blackwell at his home in Long Beach. Rubio was convicted of first-degree murder with the use of a firearm with the special circumstance of robbery and burglary.  Rubio had been on California’s death row since September 27, 2000.
 
Two others were also convicted of Blackwell’s murder committed during a home-invasion robbery. Monica M. Chavez, 59, was sentenced in Los Angeles County on March 30, 2000. She has been serving a life-without-parole sentence for first-degree murder with the use of a firearm since April 20, 2000, and is currently incarcerated at Central California Women’s Facility. Alex F. Vega, 61, was sentenced March 24, 2000, in Los Angeles County. He was also convicted of first-degree murder with the use of a firearm and has been serving a life-without-parole sentence since March 29, 2000. He is currently incarcerated at California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison in Corcoran.
 
Since 1978 when California reinstated capital punishment, 70 condemned inmates have died from natural causes, 25 have committed suicide, 13 have been executed in California, one was executed in Missouri, one was executed in Virginia, eight have died from other causes and one cause of death (Rubio) is pending. There are currently 747 people on California’s death row.

CONTACT: Sgt. Christopher Siino
(415) 455-5705
 
 

Walkaway from High Rock Conservation Camp Apprehended in Eureka, CA

WEOTT – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) announced the apprehension of a minimum security inmate who walked away from High Rock Conservation Camp in Humboldt County on Sunday, June 12.
 
At approximately 7:35 p.m. last night, Inmate Erwin Young, 33, was apprehended by CDCR Investigative Services Unit (ISU) staff on Broadway Street in Eureka, CA.

Young was committed to CDCR on November 4, 2015 from Contra Costa County for vehicle theft.  He was scheduled to be released on February 21, 2017. He will be transported to the California Correctional Center in Susanville, and will no longer be eligible to be housed in a Conservation Camp.

Since 1977, 99 percent of all offenders who have left an adult institution, camp, or community-based program without permission have been apprehended.

Contact: Lt. Aaron Yderraga
(530) 257-2181

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Offenders Earn Employment as Software Engineers Inside San Quentin State Prison

Federally and State-Authorized Joint Venture Program
allows employment of incarcerated individuals at market wages


SAN QUENTIN – The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) has entered into a Joint Venture agreement with California-based non-profit Turn 2 You, Inc., to employ trained offenders within the walls of San Quentin State Prison.

The employed offenders will have completed the Code.7370 program, a technology-based rehabilitation program also operated at San Quentin by CDCR in partnership with the California Prison Industry Authority (CALPIA) and San Francisco-based non-profit The Last Mile. The program teaches offenders industry-current computer coding skills.

Selected graduates of the Code.7370 Program will be eligible to work for Turn 2 U’s Joint Venture as software engineers, putting their newly learned skills to work on real client-driven projects and earning industry-comparable wages while serving the remainder of their sentence.

The Turn 2 U Joint Venture will operate under the business name “RebootSQ” and use a sophisticated computer hardware assembly comprised of a server cluster, network area storage (NAS), and secure network switching. This hardware will enable stand-alone delivery of all customer projects in a realistic, internet-like fashion while maintaining absolute separation from any connectivity by offenders. Hardware sponsors include Hewlett Packard, Aruba Networks, and Reduxio.

“The work experience gained by these currently incarcerated employees will greatly increase their employability when they parole,” said Turn 2 U and TLM Co-Founder, Chris Redlitz. “This Joint Venture essentially guarantees that these men will have marketable job skills, a relevant portfolio, and savings to help them with successful reentry.”

Initially, RebootSQ will employ seven offenders, including one project manager, at San Quentin, with plans to hire more trained offenders in the future at both San Quentin and proposed locations at Ironwood State Prison and the Folsom Women’s Facility.

The Joint Venture Program was established in 1990 upon the passage of Proposition 139, “The Prison Inmate Labor Initiative” a voter initiative aimed at reducing recidivism by providing opportunities for offenders to gain valuable work experience and job skills training. The Joint Venture Program is established at California’s adult institutions, and the Free Venture Program provides similar work experience opportunities at the State of California’s juvenile facilities.

Under Joint Venture Program guidelines, offenders are paid a comparable wage that is subject to deductions for Federal, State, and local taxes. In addition, 20 percent from each of the following categories is deducted from an offender’s wages: room and board, inmate trust/canteen account, family support, mandatory savings, and victims’ compensation.

“The Joint Venture Program is an exceptional model for public-private partnerships because it benefits businesses, crime victims and taxpayers, while preparing offenders for successful integration back into the community,” said CDCR Secretary and Prison Industry Board Chair, Scott Kernan. “Having Turn 2 U operating inside San Quentin is a great opportunity for these offenders, particularly when they parole, since a job helps to keep you out of prison. I am very pleased for CDCR to be a part of this innovative program.”

The Joint Venture Program and the Code 7370 Program are CDCR Rehabilitation Programs managed by the California Prison Industry Authority. (CALPIA) CALPIA is a self-supporting state entity that provides training and productive work assignments for approximately 6,500 offenders in California. The cumulative recidivism rate among CALPIA’s CTE programs is 7.13%, a success attributed to the job skills and industry certifications obtained by participating in the program.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JUNE 14, 2016

CONTACT: MICHELE KANE
(916) 462-0731
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Monday, June 13, 2016

Inmate Walks Away from Malibu Conservation Camp and is Apprehended the Same Day

MALIBU — A minimum-custody inmate, a trained CALFIRE firefighter, walked away from the Malibu Conservation Camp which is located in Malibu California, in Los Angeles County on June 11, 2016.

The inmate, 31-year-old Lashanan Durr, is described as a Black female, 175 pounds with brown eyes, shoulder-length brown hair and medium complexion. She stands approximately 5’3’’ tall with a large build. She was last seen wearing grey sweatpants and a grey sweatshirt.

Durr was committed to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on September 9, 2010, from Los Angeles County for robbery. She was scheduled to be paroled on March 16, 2017.

She was last seen at approximately 2:20 a.m. on June 11, 2016.

Walkaway apprehension efforts were initiated and anyone seeing her was asked to immediately call 9-1-1, law enforcement authorities or the California Institution for Women watch commander at (909) 597-1771, extension 4913.

Inmate Durr was apprehended the same day, June 11, in South Los Angeles by CDCR special agents and Los Angeles Police Department officers. She was taken into custody at 3 p.m. without incident.

CDCR special agents transported inmate Durr to California Institution for Women in Corona.

This matter will be referred to the San Bernardino County District Attorney's Office for possible prosecution.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 11, 2016

Contact: Lt. R. Thomas,
(909) 597-1771 ext. 4912                                                          

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Walk Away from High Rock Conservation Camp (CC #32)

Weott – A minimum-security inmate from the California Correctional Center walked away from High Rock Conservation Camp (CC #32) on June 12, 2016.

Inmate Erwin Young, 33, is a black male, 5’ 11” tall, 213 pounds, with brown eyes and black hair. He was committed to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on November 4, 2015, from Contra Costa County for Vehicle Theft.  He was scheduled to be released from CDCR custody on February 21, 2017.

Inmate Young was assigned to an inmate firefighting crew at CC #32 in Weott, California. The camp houses approximately 100 minimum-custody inmates.

Inmate Young was last seen at CC #32 by camp staff on June 12, 2016, at 9:20 p.m. outside of his assigned housing unit.  When staff approached Young he fled from the scene leaving camp grounds.

CDCR, CAL-FIRE, law enforcement personnel, along with local law enforcement agencies and the California Highway Patrol were notified and are assisting in the search for Young. All responding law enforcement agencies are continuing with the search and apprehension efforts at this time.

Anyone seeing Inmate Young should contact 9-1-1 or law enforcement authorities immediately.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE          
June 12, 2016 

Contact: Anyone having information about or knowledge of the location of Erwin Young should contact the CCC Watch Commander at (530) 257-2181 extension 4173.


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Friday, June 10, 2016

Death Row Inmate Attacks San Quentin Correctional Officer

SAN QUENTIN – Condemned inmate Jesse Manzo, 27, attacked a correctional officer at San Quentin State Prison Thursday evening as he was being returned from the shower to his cell.

Investigators at San Quentin have launched a probe into the attack that occurred just after 5 p.m. as the officer was escorting the inmate from the shower in the prison’s East Block Housing Unit. Manzo slipped out of an open handcuff and used it to strike the officer several times.

The officer suffered cuts and wounds and a significant facial injury. The officer was taken to an outside hospital for treatment and is expected to make a full recovery.

The East Block Housing Unit is one of five units in the prison where male inmates on California’s Death Row are housed.

Manzo, a self-admitted gang member, was sentenced to death in Riverside County on Aug. 2, 2013. He was convicted of first-degree murder in the 2008 gang-related hate crime killing of Raymond Franklin. Manzo has been on California’s Death Row since Aug. 12, 2013.

As of May 12, there are 747 inmates on Death Row in California. San Quentin, opened in 1852, is California's oldest correctional institution. The prison houses 4,056 inmates and employs 1,644 people.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 10, 2016         

CONTACT: Sam Robinson (415) 455-5008
OR TERRY THORNTON
(916) 445-4950
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Inmate Who Walked Away from Ben Lomond Conservation Camp Apprehended in Seattle

Santa Cruz – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) announced today the apprehension of a minimum-security state prison inmate who walked away from Ben Lomond Conservation Camp in Santa Cruz County on May 27, 2016.

On June 9, 2016, at approximately 10 p.m., inmate Leroy L. Hampton, 46, was taken into custody without incident in downtown Seattle, WA by the Seattle Police Department.

Hampton was committed to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on June 7, 2001, from Fresno County for Robbery 1st. He was scheduled to be released from CDCR custody on April 27, 2019.

Hampton will be transported back to the California Correctional Center in Susanville, and will no longer be eligible to be housed in a conservation camp.

Since 1977, 99 percent of all offenders who have left an adult institution, camp, or community-based program without permission have been apprehended.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE               
June 10, 2016                       

Contact: Lt. Aaron Yderraga
(530) 257-2181








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Thursday, June 9, 2016

Attempted Homicide of High Desert State Prison Officer Under Investigation

SUSANVILLE – High Desert State Prison (HDSP) is investigating a staff assault that injured six correctional officers.

This morning, June 9, an inmate attacked a correctional officer with a prisoner-made metal weapon while officers were processing inmates to the yard. The inmate stabbed the officer on his cheek, face, head and hand. He was transported to an outside hospital for treatment and is expected to recover.

Officers used physical force to subdue the inmate and stop his attack.

In addition, five other officers were injured during the incident. One was treated at the prison’s medical facility for a bite wound. Four were also sent to the hospital for evaluation and treatment of abrasions, swelling and exposure to blood. One of the four had also been bitten.

Staff recovered one prisoner-made stabbing weapon at the scene.

HDSP investigators identified Desmond Walls, 36, as a suspect in the attack. Walls was received from Riverside County on October 17, 2008, and is serving a 21-year sentence for first-degree burglary and second-degree robbery with use of a firearm.

Inmate Walls was also injured and taken to a hospital for treatment.

High Desert State Prison, located in Lassen County, opened in 1995 and houses 3,696 minimum- medium-, and maximum-custody inmates. The institution provides academic classes, vocational instruction and other rehabilitative programs and employs more than 1,200 people.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JUNE 9, 2016

CONTACT: LT. GREGORY CROWE
(530) 251-5100, EXT. 5501
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Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Homicide of Salinas Valley State Prison Inmate Under Investigation

SOLEDAD – Salinas Valley State Prison (SVSP) investigators are investigating an incident that left one inmate dead.

The incident occurred just after 11 a.m. this morning on one of the prison’s maximum-security yards when two inmates attacked a third inmate with prisoner-made weapons. The assailants disregarded orders from correctional officers to stop their attack. Officers quickly intervened and used chemical agents and one warning shot from the Mini-14 rifle to quell the attack.

Inmate Isaiah Williams, 38, succumbed to his injuries and was pronounced deceased at a community hospital at 12:18 p.m. Williams was committed from Fresno County on December 19, 1996, with a life sentence for first-degree murder.

SVSP investigators identified inmates Andrew Berry, 51, and Rex Dickey, 53, as the suspects in the attack.

Berry has been serving a life-without-parole sentence from Los Angeles County since May 5, 1997, for first-degree murder.

Dickey was initially received from Los Angeles County on December 10, 1982, with a two-year sentence for second-degree burglary. He was convicted of numerous burglary convictions in Los Angeles County in 1986, 1989, 1991 and 2000. He started serving a life-with-parole sentence from Kings County for second-degree murder on Sept. 30, 2003, an in-prison offense.

SVSP administrators have limited inmate movement on the facility where the incident occurred to facilitate the investigation.

SVSP opened May 1996 on approximately 300 acres in Monterey County. The institution provides long-term housing for approximately 3,700 minimum- and maximum-custody male inmates and employs 1,600 people.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
JUNE 7, 2016

CONTACT: LT. EDUARDO MAZARIEGOS,
(831) 678-5554
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Friday, June 3, 2016

Walk Away from Los Angeles Re-entry Program Apprehended


LOS ANGELES---The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) today announced that an inmate who walked away from a Los Angeles area re-entry program last Saturday has been apprehended.

Inmate Janathen Sufle was discovered missing in the early morning hours of May 28 after the facility’s staff was notified that his GPS device had been tampered with. Following a search of the facility, located in downtown Los Angeles, local law enforcement agencies were notified, as were agents from CDCR’s Office of Correctional Safety and its Fugitive Apprehension Team.  

Following surveillance of possible locations where Sufle may have fled, he was taken into custody without incident in the city of Compton on Wednesday, June 1.

Sufle was committed to CDCR from Los Angeles County on September 1, 2015 to serve a three year sentence for first degree burglary, and was scheduled to be released to parole supervision in September, 2016 due to credits earned for time spent in custody prior to sentencing and good behavior.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                            
June 3, 2016 

Contact: Bill Sessa           
(916) 445-4950                                                                                                                                                   ###

Walk Away from Pilot Rock Camp Apprehended


CRESTLINE, CA – California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) officials announced today that inmate Chad Ellebracht, 40, was taken back into custody early Friday morning, approximately four days after he was discovered missing from the minimum security Pilot Rock Conservation Camp #15.  

Inmate Ellebracht was taken into custody by Fresno Special Service Unit at approximately 2:00 am in Visalia, California.  Ellebracht walked away from the Pilot Rock Camp sometime after a routine security check at 5:40 am on Tuesday, May 31, 2016.  Ellebracht has been returned to California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, where he will be re-assigned to a prison and will not be eligible to work in a conservation camp.

Ellebracht was committed to CDCR for a three year sentence for possession of a controlled substance.  He was scheduled to be released on August 8, 2016.  This matter will be referred to the San Bernardino County District Attorney for prosecution of escape.

Since 1977, ninety-nine percent of all offenders who have left an adult institution, camp, or community-based program without permission have been apprehended.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                          
June 3, 2016

Contact:  Lt. C. Acosta
 (209) 984-5291 extension 5499
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