Monday, August 29, 2016

Inmate Who Walked Away from Chimney Incident Base Apprehended Within Hours

SAN LUIS OBISPO – A minimum-security inmate who walked away from the Chimney Incident Base Camp in San Luis Obispo, located near the community of San Luis Obispo, in San Luis Obispo County, was apprehended within hours.

Inmate Jose A. Paredes, 25, was last seen in his assigned Base Camp area on Monday, Aug. 29, 2016, at around 3:40 a.m. during a routine security check. The Chimney Incident Base Camp staff discovered Paredes missing, then searched the inmate tent area and surrounding Base Camp perimeter. Paredes was not located. All local law enforcement agencies and the California Highway Patrol were notified and assisted in the search.

Paredes was apprehended at 10:09 a.m. by officers from the Cuesta College Police Department, who discovered him hiding near the campus soccer field. He was taken into custody without incident, and has been returned to CDCR custody.

Paredes was committed to CDCR from Los Angeles County to serve a two-year sentence for first-degree burglary. He was scheduled to be released to parole supervision in May 2017.



Since 1977, ninety-nine percent of all offenders who have left an adult institution, camp, or community-based program without permission have been apprehended.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                           
August 29, 2016                                   

Contact:  Lt. Chris. Acosta
(209) 984-5291 EXT: 5499
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Thursday, August 25, 2016

New Report: California’s Return-to-Prison Rate Falls for the Fifth Straight Year to 44.6 percent


Report shows substance abuse treatment is a major factor in reducing recidivism
SACRAMENTO – The rate at which offenders return to state prison continues to fall, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). CDCR released its latest annual recidivism report today and it shows the total three-year return-to-prison rate for all offenders released during fiscal year 2010-2011 is 44.6 percent, down from 54.3 percent last year.

“Most offenders sent to prison are eventually released, and so rehabilitation is in everyone’s best interest – our staff, the inmates and the community at large,” said CDCR Secretary Scott Kernan. “The latest recidivism rate shows that we’re helping more inmates learn how to live a law-abiding, productive life.”

The rate at which people return to prison has consistently trended downward since fiscal year 2005-2006 when the rate was 67.5 percent. For the first time, more people released in one year stayed out of prison than returned.

CDCR also examines the return-to-prison rates of offenders who received in-prison substance abuse treatment and community-based substance abuse treatment programs. Offenders who received both in-prison substance abuse treatment and completed post-release aftercare had a 15.3 percent return-to-prison rate, the lowest of all people released in fiscal year 2010-2011.



CDCR tracks the 95,690 people who were released from state prison after serving their sentence between July 1, 2010, and June 30, 2011, for three years. Not only are their one-, two- and three-year return-to-prison rates analyzed, offender demographics and characteristics including age, gender, ethnicity, length of sentence, type of offense, county of commitment, prior incarcerations, mental health status and risk for a reconviction are also examined.

The implementation of Public Safety Realignment in 2011 continues to have an impact on the state’s return-to-prison rate. Under Realignment, no offenders were released early. Effective October 1, 2011, offenders arrested on a parole violation or convicted of non-violent, non-serious, non-registrable sex offense felonies serve their sentences under county supervision instead of in state prison. Although all the offenders in the fiscal year 2010-2011 cohort were released before the passage of Assembly Bill 109, the law was in effect for varying amounts of time during their three-year follow-up period and contributed to the decline in the number of people returning to prison for parole violations.

CDCR studies recidivism by tracking arrests, convictions and returns to prison and uses returns to prison as its primary measure. An offender is counted as a recidivist if he or she has returned to state prison for a new crime or for a parole violation within a three-year period. This approach is consistent with previous reports so policymakers and researchers have year-to-year comparisons.

The latest Outcome Evaluation Report is published annually by CDCR’s Office of Research, which provides research, data analysis and evaluation to implement and assess evidence-based programs and practices, strengthen policy, inform management decisions and ensure accountability. The office has reported the rates at which adult offenders return to prison following release from state prison since 1977.




FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
August 25, 2016

CONTACT: Terry Thornton 
 (916) 445-4950
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Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Inmate Death at California Medical Facility Being Investigated as a Possible Homicide

VACAVILLE – Officials at California Medical Facility (CMF) in Vacaville are investigating the death of an inmate as a possible homicide.

On Monday, August 22, 2016, at approximately 10:35 p.m., a 66-year-old CMF inmate was found unresponsive in a dormitory lying face down in a pool of blood. Life-saving measures were initiated and he was transported to the CMF Medical Clinic, where he was pronounced dead at 11:14 p.m.

The deceased inmate was received from Fresno County on July 10, 1986, and was serving a life sentence with the possibility of parole for first-degree murder with the use of a firearm and attempted second-degree murder with great bodily injury. The inmate’s name is being withheld pending notification of his next of kin.

The incident is being investigated by CMF’s Investigative Services Unit. The dormitory has been sealed as a crime scene and the 30 inmates housed there at the time have been transferred to the Administrative Segregation Unit pending the investigation. The Solano County District Attorney’s Office, the Solano County Coroner’s Office and the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation’s Special Service Unit are assisting with the investigation. The Office of the Inspector General was notified.

CMF administrators have modified inmate movement to facilitate the ongoing investigation.

No staff members were injured as a result of this incident.

CMF was established in 1955 and houses minimum-, medium-, maximum- and high-security inmates. CMF has a Correctional Treatment Center, inpatient and outpatient psychiatric facilities, a Hospice Unit for terminally ill inmates, and general population. Additionally, the Department of State Hospitals operates a licensed, Acute Care Psychiatric Hospital and an Intermediate Care Facility within CMF. The prison houses approximately 2,600 inmates and employs nearly 2,000 people.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                       
August 23, 2016                                      

Contact: Lt. Andre Gonzales
 (707) 449-6509
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Thursday, August 18, 2016

Four Correctional Officers Recovering After Inmate Attack

SAN DIEGO – Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility officials are investigating a staff assault that sent four correctional officers to the hospital.

On August 17, 2016, at 2 p.m., inmate Charles Morgan, 33, spit on a correctional officer and struck him in the face. Inmate Morgan then attacked a responding officer by striking her in the face and knocking her to the ground where she hit the back of her head. Morgan struck two more officers who responded to the incident by hitting them with his fists and elbows. Officers used pepper spray and physical force to subdue and restrain the inmate.

The four officers were taken to an outside hospital for treatment. Three officers suffered minor injuries. One officer suffered a concussion and was treated for a head injury. She was released and is recovering at home with her family. All the officers are expected to recover.

Inmate Morgan was treated by medical staff at the prison and last night was admitted to a hospital in the community.

Inmate Morgan was admitted to state prison on January 7, 2013, from San Diego County and is serving a six-year sentence for assault with a deadly weapon. In 2001, he served a two-year sentence from San Luis Obispo County for battery on a peace officer. In 2004, while still in custody, Morgan received a two-year sentence from San Diego County for battery on a non-prisoner. And in 2005, he battered on a correctional officer and received a three-year sentence from San Diego County for battery on a non-prisoner inflicting great bodily injury.

Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility opened in July 1987 on approximately 780 acres in San Diego County. The primary mission of the prison is to provide housing and supervision for minimum- to high-security inmates. Designed as a training and work-oriented facility, RJDCF provides health care, vocational, academic and industrial programs for nearly 3,200 male inmates and employs about 1,500 people.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
AUGUST 18, 2016

CONTACT:  LT. PHILIP BRACAMONTE
(619) 661-7802

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Offender Who Walked Away from Los Angeles Re-entry Facility Apprehended

LOS ANGELES — A man who walked away from the Male Community Re-entry Program (MCRP) in Los Angeles County Aug. 15 was apprehended Aug. 17.

Jeffrey Scott Pine, 47, was apprehended at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 17, by agents from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) Special Services Unit in the city of Downey, in Los Angeles County. He was taken into custody without incident and transported to the California Institution for Men in Chino.

Pine had been participating in the MCRP, which allows eligible offenders committed to state prison to serve the end of their sentences in the re-entry center and provides them the programs and tools necessary to transition from custody to the community. It is a voluntary program for male offenders who have approximately 180 days left to serve. The program links participants to a range of community-based rehabilitative services that assist with substance use disorders, mental health care, medical care, employment, education, housing, family reunification and social support.

Pine was admitted from Los Angeles County on June 8, 2015, to serve a three-year sentence for false impersonation. He was scheduled to be released to probation in October 2016.

Since 1977, 99 percent of all offenders who have left an adult institution, camp, or community-based program without permission have been apprehended.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
AUGUST 18, 2016

CONTACT: Krissi Khokhobashvili
(916) 445-4950
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Monday, August 15, 2016

Offender Walks Away from Los Angeles Re-entry Facility

LOS ANGELES  — California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) officials are looking for an offender who walked away from a Los Angeles re-entry facility on Monday, Aug. 15.

Jeffrey Scott Pine, 47, was transferred from California Institution for Men to the Male Community Re-entry Program (MCRP) in Los Angeles County on July 5. After being notified at approximately 1:37 p.m. Aug. 15 that Pine’s GPS device had been tampered with, staff initiated an emergency search. Pine’s GPS device was found down the street from the facility.

Notification was immediately made to local law enforcement agencies. Within minutes, agents from CDCR’s Office of Correctional Safety were dispatched to locate and apprehend Pine.

Pine is a white male, bald, with green eyes. He is 5 feet, 11 inches tall and weighs 165 pounds.

Pine was admitted from Los Angeles County on June 8, 2015, to serve a three-year sentence for false impersonation. He was scheduled to be released to probation in October 2016.

The MCRP allows eligible offenders committed to state prison to serve the end of their sentences in the re-entry center and provides them the programs and tools necessary to transition from custody to the community. It is a voluntary program for men who have approximately 180 days left to serve. The program links offenders to a range of community-based rehabilitative services that assist with substance use disorders, mental health care, medical care, employment, education, housing, family reunification and social support.

Anyone who sees Pine or has any knowledge of his whereabouts should immediately contact law enforcement or call 911.


Since 1977, 99 percent of all offenders who have left an adult institution, camp, or community-based program without permission have been apprehended.

For immediate release
Aug. 15, 2016

Contact: Krissi Khokhobashvili
(916) 445-4950

Offender Who Walked Away from Los Angeles Re-entry Facility Apprehended

LOS ANGELES — A man who walked away from the Male Community Re-entry Program (MCRP) in Los Angeles County Aug. 12 was apprehended the following day.

Sarkis Akopyan, 33, was apprehended at 8:05 p.m. Aug. 13 by agents from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) Special Service Unit in the city of Glendale, in Los Angeles County. He was taken into custody without incident and transported to the California Institution for Men in Chino.

Akopyan had been participating in the MCRP, which allows eligible offenders committed to state prison to serve the end of their sentences in the re-entry center and provides them the programs and tools necessary to transition from custody to the community. It is a voluntary program for male offenders who have approximately 180 days left to serve. The program links participants to a range of community-based rehabilitative services that assist with substance use disorders, mental health care, medical care, employment, education, housing, family reunification and social support.

Akopyan was admitted to CDCR from Los Angeles County on March 25, 2016, to serve a two-year sentence for vehicle theft. He was scheduled to be released to probation in November 2016.

Since 1977, 99 percent of all offenders who have left an adult institution, camp, or community-based program without permission have been apprehended.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE               
August 14, 2016  

Contact: Krissi Khokhobashvili
916) 445-4950
                                                           ###

Friday, August 12, 2016

Offender Walks Away from Los Angeles Re-entry Facility

LOS ANGELES — California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) officials are looking for an offender who walked away from a Los Angeles re-entry facility on Friday, Aug. 12.

Sarkis Akopyan, 33, was transferred from California Institution for Men to the Male Community Re-entry Program (MCRP) in Los Angeles County on Aug. 9. After being notified at approximately 10:06 a.m. that Akopyan’s GPS device had been tampered with, staff initiated an emergency count and facility search. Akopyan’s GPS device was found down the street from the facility.

Notification was immediately made to local law enforcement agencies. Within minutes, agents from CDCR’s Office of Correctional Safety were dispatched to locate and apprehend Akopyan.

Akopyan, who is from South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands (a group of Islands in the south Atlantic), has black hair and brown eyes. He is 5 feet, 7 inches tall and weighs 150 pounds.

Akopyan was admitted to CDCR from Los Angeles County on March 25, 2016, to serve a two-year sentence for vehicle theft. He was scheduled to be released to probation in November 2016.

The MCRP allows eligible offenders committed to state prison to serve the end of their sentences in the re-entry center and provides them the programs and tools necessary to transition from custody to the community. It is a voluntary program for men who have approximately 180 days left to serve. The program links participants to a range of community-based rehabilitative services that assist with substance use disorders, mental health care, medical care, employment, education, housing, family reunification and social support.

Anyone who sees Akopyan or has any knowledge of his whereabouts should immediately contact law enforcement or call 911.

Since 1977, 99 percent of all offenders who have left an adult institution, camp or community-based program without permission have been apprehended.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE               
August 12, 2016                           

Contact: Krissi Khokhobashvili
(916) 445-4950
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Monday, August 8, 2016

Seven More California Prisons Accredited with the American Correctional Association

With 30 California prisons now accredited, CDCR on track to have
all adult institutions accredited by 2017

SACRAMENTO – The Commission on Accreditation for Corrections accredited seven more California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) prisons, bringing the total number of accredited state prisons to 30. The most recent round of accreditations was announced yesterday during the American Correctional Association’s (ACA) 146th Congress of Corrections in Boston.

“Our success with accreditation is proof of the progress CDCR is making in improving our prison system,” said CDCR Secretary Scott Kernan. “We started this ACA process six years ago at a time when there were still too many inmates in our prisons and too few resources to rehabilitate them. ACA accreditation demonstrates our efforts to reform and improve California’s correctional system are working well.”

Institutions seeking accreditation must undergo intensive evaluations by the ACA that culminate in the accreditation audit, a comprehensive assessment that encompasses every area of prison management including administrative and fiscal controls, staff training and development, the physical plant, safety and emergency procedures, conditions of confinement, rules and discipline, inmate programs, health care, food service, sanitation, and the provision of basic services affecting the life, safety and health of inmates and staff.

Institutions seeking accreditation have to comply with 525 ACA standards and score 100 percent for 62 mandatory requirements and at least 90 percent on 463 non-mandatory requirements. Half of the mandatory standards address health care.

California Correctional Center, California Institution for Men, California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison in Corcoran, Calipatria State Prison, Pleasant Valley State Prison, Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility and Valley State Prison met all of the mandatory requirements and considerably surpassed the 90 percent mark for non-mandatory items.

In addition, Correctional Training Facility, High Desert State Prison, Mule Creek State Prison, North Kern State Prison and Pelican Bay State Prison – accredited in 2013 – were re-accredited for three more years.

For the non-mandatory requirements, California Correctional Center received a score of 98.3 percent, California Institution for Men received 98.0 percent, California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison in Corcoran received 99.1 percent, Calipatria State Prison received 98.8 percent, Pleasant Valley State Prison received 99.3 percent, Richard J. Donovan Correctional Facility received 97.7 percent and Valley State Prison received 99.3 percent.

California City Correctional Facility, California Correctional Institution, California Health Care Facility, California Rehabilitation Center and Deuel Vocational Institution have started the process of seeking accreditation in 2017. In addition, the eight institutions accredited in 2014 will seek reaccreditation.

Founded in 1870, the ACA is the leading internationally recognized authority on corrections and its role in the criminal justice system and in society. It develops standards based on valid, reliable research designed to improve correctional facilities on all levels. The ACA facilitates the accreditation process and its Commission on Accreditation for Corrections certifies prisons. ACA standards have been integrated in more than 1,300 facilities and agencies around the world.

CDCR began the process of seeking nationally recognized accreditation from the ACA in 2010. CDCR is slated to accomplish its goal of having all of its 34 state-owned institutions and one leased prison accredited by next year.

CDCR’s Special Review Unit in the Office of Audits and Court Compliance provides departmental oversight and works with its Division of Health Care Services in the accreditation process.

For more about CDCR, visit http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/


For more about the American Correctional Association, visit http://www.aca.org/aca_prod_imis/aca_member


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
AUGUST 8, 2016

CONTACT: TERRY THORNTON
 (916) 445-4950
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